Jump to content

Recommended Posts

mikef

This poster, meant for industry use I assume, shows some useful pointers.

http://jst.com/pdf/JST_CrinpChart (English).pdf

You can get sets of connectors and wire from lots of places.  I use the specialist model suppliers where possible.  
Beware of the two standards of male/female identification.

Many people call the connector on the left below, ‘female’, because the housing on the right slides inside the housing on the left.  Electronics people call the connector on the left, 'male', because the conductor pins in the housing go inside the sockets in the right hand connector.
The two little adaptor cables in the picture are the kind of thing you'll soon be making.....

C46EC3B5-929F-47FD-8E84-39F090BCCE98.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 111
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • wookman

    63

  • oipigface

    14

  • satinet

    10

  • pete beadle

    6

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

The Extreme has now returned to the environment it was assigned for. The English Open at Whitesheet provided the crossed and challenging conditions. Pictured here with a later RTG offering. 

The Extreme is now test flown and is good. Cg  a little forward but not to far out. Set up seemed good. Aileron differential is good. Front loaded snap flap has it turning nicely. Flew straight as a d

The Extreme is now ready to go. I managed to shoehorn the mag switch in, just. A bit of programming and set all the throws and we are good to go. So the question is, will I get a chance to fly it befo

Posted Images

oipigface

I’ve got three or four crimping tools and I don’t use any of them for servo wire. I find a pair of needle nose pliers does the job well for me, but it’s taken a lot of practice to get confident.

Link to post
Share on other sites
wookman

Thank you for the crimping info. 

Threaded the new fuselage harness into place using the draw strings that were put in as the old harness came out. Looping the cables backwards in the fuselage has allowed them to go past the wing joiner apertures down next to the ballast tube. A little bit of foam wedged in will stop the cables getting into the aperture making rigging the Extreme reasonable Wookproof. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
wookman

Glued in one of the fuselage plugs using the wing and joiner as a jig. Just pushed the wing on far enough for the plug and incidence pins to engage without closing up the gap. The wing and fuselage combo was stood on the wing tip to allow the epoxy to set. The gap was left so that the epoxy that runs out of the fuselage doesn't stick the wing on or the plug and socket together. I will do the other one tomorrow. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
wookman

The Extreme is now standing on it's other wing tip while the epoxy cures on the other fuselage plug. The fuselage servos are in and the v tail programming sorted as far as the centering and direction are concerned, the throws can come later. I have raked the servo arms backwards one spline tooth to try and compensate for the elevator horn holes being way behind the hinge line. The rest will have to come out when the throws are finally programmed.

Work can start on the wings soon. New servo install and new linkages. General tidy up including rebonding at least one of the incidence pins which is retractable at the moment and geneating some clearance between the tip of the flap and the root of the aileron. This seems to be needed to allow for the dihedral break in the wing panel and getting some up flap when it is  mixed back to the aileron.

Link to post
Share on other sites
wookman

Nearly glued the wing on! Checked it while the epoxy was still green and managed to pull the wing off. It was only the plug that was a little bit stuck so no problem in the end. Excess epoxy now  all trimmed away and the wings go on lovely, nice and flush after a bit of trimming on the greenies. 

One of the aileron servos is out now. The mount came out reasonably easily too. there is a lot of trimming of epoxy to tidy up before I can get the new mounts in. One down three to go!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
oipigface

Would you like a can of R5, Graham? £8.00 (cost price). I use it all the time to avoid things like that happening.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
wookman

Hi OPF.

R5? Not come across that before. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
oipigface

Release agent. Hard to get. Works very well.

Link to post
Share on other sites
satinet

Bite his hand off. Cheap price and extremely useful. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
wookman

Put me a can by please OPF. I will pick it up next time we fly. Socially distanced obviously just throw it at me!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
oipigface
25 minutes ago, wookman said:

Put me a can by please OPF. I will pick it up next time we fly. Socially distanced obviously just throw it at me!!

Will do. I’ll bring the sanitiser as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites
wookman

Servo removal is going well, if not entirely as expected. The mount for the 3150 on the aileron was loose at the aft end and was lifting. Undo the screws and out pops the servo. It was the easy enough to peel the mount out intact. Flap servo was not quite so straight forward. Screws out and the servo refused to budge. Application of various mechanical abuses saw the servo pop out still tenaciously attached to the mount. More abuse and the two parted eventually. Much subtle hacking with a number ten scalpel later and I have two nice clean servo bays waiting for a shiny pair of KST 125s.  As the Haynes manual for rebuilding mouldies says Now repeat for the other side!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
wookman

Now servo frames are a great idea but like all good ideas it can go Pete Tong in the execution. 

8FEE216C-B953-4C28-B9ED-85E9B4A5E3A1.jpeg

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
wookman

3 down 1 to go. Third servo bay now cleaned up and ready. A quick look at the forth one reveals some more unexpected remedial work. The loom for the aileron servo has been well and truly bonded to the side of the flap servo frame. You just know that parting the frame from the loom is going to involve tearing chunks of insulation off. I thought I had done all the soldering but it’s looking like that’s not the case. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
wookman

Last of the wing servos come  out of it’s frame no problem. The frame popped out reasonably easily just leaving the now familiar number 10 scalpel surgery to remove the residual epoxy. Damage to the stuck loom extended beyond the servo bay inboard and outboard where glue had run. The scrap box has yielded up a length of similar cable so the damaged area can be cut out and a new bit spliced in. Unwinding the twist on the cables has ‘lengthened’ them enough to move the inboard damage into the servo bay. 

2BECC142-422B-479A-9CF1-35990EF7EE49.jpeg

CEF2BD20-3551-4975-BBFA-A12502E84908.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
wookman

The loom is now sorted. A new length or cable spliced in and all the soldering gear put away again. Wings are prepped for servo installation. Masking tape is your friend. Aileron cables taped up out of the way to prevent a repeat of the original problem. 

One of the next issues is that the holes in the horns are a slack fit on the clevis pins. Ideas to sort this gratefully received.  

B94EA2A0-A4DD-4B5E-8F17-060D136D289D.jpeg

B49D30F8-5D09-4F7E-8860-2D6C776CD32D.jpeg

C3353F15-EBCE-442A-9D9F-0E2D5F2318D3.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites
isoaritfirst

Bit late now but for reference. Removing pieces of stuck old epoxy I previously have used a wood chisel. 
warm it up with a blow torch and it will slice it off easily. 
be careful of course not to go against the wing inner skin. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
isoaritfirst

The horn holes can be repaired with cyano. 
glue the clevises in place and then rotate it free. 
it will last quite a while before needing doing again. 
Better to remove and replace the horns. 
digging them out isn’t that difficult. 
It’s ok to make a bigger hole than the original in the process. 
gluing the new horns in place with thickened epoxy  will back fill them. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Who's Online   6 Members, 0 Anonymous, 34 Guests (See full list)

    • TeamMT
    • f3fman
    • f3fisa
    • Mikeb52
    • cirrusRC
    • Redbird



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.