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Crimping tool recommendations


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Marc RC pilot

I am tempted to go down the crimping route where possible (rather than soldering) because it seems to allow for a clean/hassle free/low profile fit with no stiff soldering points to worry about

My local Toolstation shop has a few for sale. My main use will be for wing servo extensions and the likes and I won't be using it much and my budget is low-end.

Link to Toolstation crimpers: 

https://www.toolstation.com/hand-tools/crimping-tool/c1164

 

crimpers.thumb.PNG.ab2c1711a14547f554fe7dbf3ca2f16c.PNG

 

Any advice  is appreciated (perhaps a crimp kit my be a better option?)

 

Marc 

 

PS great video by Painless360 on how to crimp: 

 

 

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Marc RC pilot
mikef

Forget the crimper/connector deal above - it's a one shot cheap tool with loads of connectors you don't need for servos and batteries.

These are worth a look...

One shot Tool vs PA-09:-
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3Cw9YFLDZeo
 

PA-09 vs IWS 2820M

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=25qObkSUHng

The  guy has a lot of crimping videos on his channel!

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cirrusRC

I also use the PA-09.   Worth the extra money - have been really pleased with the results.        Sometimes, buying cheap tools is a false economy.

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EssexBOF

Have been using the crimping tool, with the blue handles, which the reviewer does not like very much from the video, for over 15 years now. There can be a problem with the crimp over the outer covering,  sliding into the connector. But have found that some connectors are better than others, as t the size of the aperture that has to accept the outer cable.  Biggest problem I find is the connectors, not holding in position, whilst feeding them into the crimping tool.  So I gently squeeze the crimp  onto the wire with a small wire cutter, or pliers, so it holds sufficiently , so as not to move at the point of loading into the crimp tool. Not really a problem when you get used to it. Futaba type seems better than the JR type.

As to crimping the wire portion, on thinner gauge wire, I always fold the wire back over the outer for a short distance, then slide onto the connector, with the wire laying along the bottom of the connector and crimp together. This gives a good contact at the wire joint.

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Marc RC pilot

Thanks for the good advice gentlemen; much appreciated.

I will look into those Engineer PA-09 crimpers for sure (when I get back from shopping) as it makes good sense what has been said regarding quality/end product etc

And what connectors/pins should I be looking to buy ( Mainly for Futaba type connectors for wing servos etc)?  I presume there is a quality difference on these as well ? 

 

 

 

 

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oipigface

I seem to be in a minority here, but for servo wires, I have never use a crimping tool. I always use a pair of long, needle-nosed pliers. I have got a variety of crimping tools that I use for other electrical work, including a16-ton hydraulic job, but I’ve not found a tool that will do Futaba plugs and sockets better that pliers. Strip insulation to fit, position end of wire inside the terminal with the insulation ending in between the two crimps. Use the pliers to fold in the wire retention lugs first. Test to check the wire is secure. Then do the same to the insulation grips. Practice a bit before trying to do a real job!

The pliers need to be needle-nosed to be narrow enough to do the two sets of luge separately, and long so you can see what you are doing while you are doing it. 
 

You could spend your money on a wire-stripper instead.
 

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Marc RC pilot
2 hours ago, oipigface said:

including a16-ton hydraulic job

Jesus oipigface, You don't mess about do you!... :)👍

Thanks for your head's up...Brill . I got both items required that you mention (long-ish nose pliers and wire stripper) to have a go at manual surgery :)

Where would be good place to get those  crimp connectors?  I'm not really  sure what I need tbh

Many thanks

 

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mikef

Again, for RC models, there are lots of housings there you will never need and not many of the ones you will...

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Marc RC pilot

Cheers Mike,  apreciated.  

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f3fman

I never got on with crimping so I rapidly went back to buying inexpensive leads and cut and solder/sleeve as necessary. Touch wood I have never had a problem with them being relatively inexpensive leads  😉

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Ribs

Thought I'd chip in - it's been a while 😉

When I've been through this pain in the past - I bought about three or four different brands of crimpers - I got really frustrated and always had trouble getting the pins to insert properly. Any kind of crimp tool seemed to leave me with a wire that then needed pulling and pushing with ever more ingenious tools to get the connector parts to snap properly on the locking tangs...

At some point, I finally figured out that the wire gauge used for servo wires makes a massive difference.  If you use high quality, thin gauge wire to crimp the lines, using a decent crimping tool, you will find the job a pleasure and very straightforward.

 

 

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EssexBOF
7 hours ago, Ribs said:

Thought I'd chip in - it's been a while 😉

When I've been through this pain in the past - I bought about three or four different brands of crimpers - I got really frustrated and always had trouble getting the pins to insert properly. Any kind of crimp tool seemed to leave me with a wire that then needed pulling and pushing with ever more ingenious tools to get the connector parts to snap properly on the locking tangs...

At some point, I finally figured out that the wire gauge used for servo wires makes a massive difference.  If you use high quality, thin gauge wire to crimp the lines, using a decent crimping tool, you will find the job a pleasure and very straightforward.

Very good point, Ribs.

Also the metal parts vary, with make as do the plastic plugs. Stick with the parts that come as a set, as others may not interchange properly.

 

 

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Mizuno52

That's lots of conflicting advice, Marc! Here's some more ..... I bought a pair of tools some years ago specifically for making up my own servo extensions. The first is a tool for stripping all three leads at the same time adjustable to whatever bare wire length you need. The second crimps the insulated wire into the servo plug and then via a second operation crimps thebare end also into the plug. After learning the technique, I have not looked back. I have a " how to " manual if you want a copy. If you go to Component Shop on the net you can buy both tools and any cables, wires or plugs you need. They also do batteries and their service is A1.

By the way, I'm not on commission and the Skywalker has had several successful outings.

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pete beadle

Hi Mizuno52

#2 for Component Shop who will make "custom" leads to order at very reasonable prices

I am largely one-handed these days (the result of a stroke) and, though I love this discussion it simply isn't possible to produce leads by using crimping tools or any other tools that take two hands to operate....good to read the to's and fro's of the discussion though:)

Regards

Pete

BARCS1702

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