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Transmitter / Receiver recommendations please


Hexaflexagon

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Hexaflexagon

Back after 30 years, now with a young grandson in tow who's keen to get started after seeing my old Chris Foss Phase 6 (least I think it's a 6) in the loft. I built it to use along with a 33 MHz Sanwa Tx a lifetime ago and never got around to flying it, so I'm in the process of checking it out and fixing a few repairs.

Now I'm in the process of buying a modern foam electric powered glider of some sort and a new Tx & Rx. Don't want to spend a fortune so happy to start out with something affordable whilst seeing how far we get.
I've seen a Spektrum DXS combo mentioned at ~£120 and a DX6e combo at ~£190. They come with different receivers, the former with an AR620, the latter an AR420.

I've tried comparing all the blurb about them but getting a bit lost. Can anyone offer an idiots guide to the essential differences and if there are any significant practical advantages to a DXS6e and whether it compromises using the Tx with other manufacturers' receivers should we move on to additional aircraft.


I'd also appreciate comments/recommendations for other manufacturers.

Usual TIA
 


 

 

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wookman

Hi Hex.

My threepence ha' pennies worth.

Don't go for a Spekky DXs or DXe. Not flexible enough, you will grow out of it too quickly. No model memories on the s and you will need a computer and a lead for the e. No resale value to speak of if you do progress.

Go for a DX6e if you don't want it to talk to you, or a DX6 if you do. Combine it with a AR620 rx, tiny full range with internal aerials. Half decent resale value if you don't progress and it will allow you to program much more complex models.

Basically you cannot mix manufacturers. Spekky tx means Spekky rxs, though you can use orange and lemon rxs. Basically each manufacturer uses a different protocol.

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SteveH

How about a Radiomaster TX16S? You will never outgrow the functionality of this transmitter and for around £125 bought in the UK and due to its multiprotocol feature it will bind to all Spectrum receivers and many more manufacturers receivers.

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wookman

All the above is true but you will be buying into OpenTX which is a steep learning curve and the multi protocol system is not entirely plug and play from what i have read.

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SteveH

Hi Wookman - I agree that buying into OpenTX is a steep learning curve but there is plenty of information / youtube videos showing how to do it. I once owned a Spectrum transmitter and quite honestly I found it very frustrating.

The multi protocol system on the Radiomaster TX16S is definitely plug and play. I have bound all sorts of Frsky receivers and Spectrum receivers without any problems at all.

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ALinOxon

About a year or so ago I was in a very similar situation to you Hex. I was coming from a Futaba on 35mHz and trying to decide which first 2.4gHz radio I wanted/needed. I spent an enormous amount of time researching, eventually settling for a Radiomaster TX16s, and I am delighted with it. So, I can’t tell you anything about Spektrum radios, or Taranis, or Jeti, etc, only my experience with the Radiomaster.

Pros:

1.     Price: £120 from UK

2.     Multi-protocol-module (MPM) which allows you to use virtually any receiver you like. So you are not tied to any specific manufacturer, and the list of protocols supported is enormous. I use some FrSky (£25-35) for DLG’s, plus Spektrum and small Lemon rx (most sub £10) in light slopers and small electric foamies. And all have been very straightforward in binding, so if that’s plug’n’play, I have had no issues thus far (probably just jinxed myself now!). Radiomaster have also recently released a whole collection of their own receivers, mostly priced around £10.

3.     OpenTX is extremely powerful and versatile.

Cons:

1.     OpenTX. As wookman mentions, it was a steep learning curve getting my head around it (I'm 70), but I’m glad I stuck in there. Yes, there were frustrations along the way, but any new radio can do that to you if you have no previous experience! There are plenty of very good guides and videos on the internet – my favourite at present is ‘RC Video Reviews’. Once you grasp the basics, and you don’t need to grasp too many to get up and running, it is magical. 

At the same time, my son also bought a RM TX16s, and links to his son, my grandson age 11, who has a Jumper T12 Pro. This has exactly the same features as the TX16s, full OpenTX and MPM, but in a smaller form factor, ideal for smaller hands!

I am in no way saying that mine is the perfect choice, but this is just my opinion based on my experience of having my first 2.4gHz radio for the last year.

Good luck.

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cirrusRC

Did someone say the T16 doesn't fully support LUA scripting aka SOARTX?

 

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Hexaflexagon

Many thanks to everyone for all the extremely useful comments.
And to Alin, who seems my doppelganger in so many ways, (I'm also in my 70s with a 10 y.o. grandson), thanks for flagging up the whole subject of OpenTx which had completely passed me by. 

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Marc RC pilot

Was in a similar situation as you Hex. I have now settled with this TX/RX and very happy with them/great bang for buck: 

https://www.t9hobbysport.com/taranis-x9d-plus-se-2019-2.4ghz-transmitter

and these receivers: 

https://www.t9hobbysport.com/frsky-archer-gr6-access-receiver

There are "light" version TX's which are quite a bit cheaper also.

Might also be worth putting up a wanted ad here and/or the BMFA site as bargains can be had/save some money. 

Good luck 

Marc 

 

 

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Hexaflexagon

A quick follow up Q. and thinking ahead should I ever use a V-tail glider.

Can an Open Source TX like say a RadioMaster TX16S handle that?

I ask since in scouring the world of transmitters I saw one or two that mentioned they didn't

 

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Scram

An OpenTx transmitter can handle any model.  I'm using the Taranis X9D to fly fixed wing planes, slope soaring gliders and helicopters.  It does take a bit of learning and Mike Shellim's OpenTx clinic: 

https://rc-soar.com/opentx/

can teach you just about all you need for fixed wing models with downloadable software available.

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Dave Elam

I've got both Spektrum and FrSky transmitters. Taking into account the original poster's gap of 30 years flying I would recommend going Spektrum. While Open TX is undoubtedly a very powerful operating system I suspect the poster will be only using a fraction of its capabilities and those could be easily handled with a Spektrum TX.

I have an X10S and QX7 and I just never got on with Open TX and find the menu driven system of my Spektrum DX9 far more intuitive and more than capable of providing intricate set ups for my F3F gliders.

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ALinOxon

For anyone trying to decide which radio to buy may find this latest video from Painless360 of use. It does a very good job of highlighting some of the issues which may be encountered if you are leaning towards a FrSky transmitter.

 

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