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What sort of radio tx and rx are you using?


MikevE
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I'm interested now as I have my name down for an Eternity from Flightech, likely to arrive in Jan 2022. Neil suggests my TX16S Max will be OK, but I'm still interested in what you guys are using as transmitters and receivers.

I'm currently flying a couple of 3D printed electric planes from Eclipson, a Vladimir's Models Yoda DLG, and a number of FPV drones. Only started flying again this year, before that I flew with @MikeDLG in Zimbabwe almost 30 years ago. We were such reprobates back then haha.

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PeteMitchell

I use a Jeti DS16 which I have had for something like 6 or 7 years. The rc link is absolutely rock solid in my all carbon F5J gliders  and it can mix just about anything to everything in as many flight modes as I need or dream up. Its only possible down side is that it is a bit heavy as the case is machined from solid alloy😀

 

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Since nobody else has replied, I would merely suggest that if you're buying a top end model, then matching it with top end electronics might be the way to go.  

Having said that, I've had zero problems with a spektrum DX6 and Spektrum receiver now, which I've had for 5 years, and would happily use on a top end model. 

I would suggest using Tx & Rx of the same make, as I once tried a Lemon receiver, which wouldn't work either a reversing 'Y' piece, or an Altis height limiter. Everything else worked fine. 

Hope that helps. 

 

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You will get many responces as to what is the best radio to use and they will be in the majority of cases linked to that persons experience of that make of radio. For years, Multiplex was the go to gear for glider flying, but they lost their way of late. As Pete Mitchell says Jeti is excellent, but is not cheap, but then some say you should match the cost of the model to the radio. Also the programming has to be usable by you, no good buying something you cannot get your head around, as you need to be able to change things on the field, without an instruction book.

The game changer came along in the form of Open Tx, which brought a cheap reliable system, with as many ways of setting up models as does Jeti, for about the 1/4 of the outlay. I have used FrSky Taranis X9D Tx for some 7 years now and found it pretty good, but the build is not up to Jeti standards. Trim switches can fail but at £2/3 to replace are cheap, as are the stick units, but they have improved now. The majority of Japanes sets, used to use set programming format, to assign items, which I found a pain. Modern outfits lean towards assigning any thing to whatever suits you.

There are othe outfits that are available now, see Mike Shillims site for some details of radios, that are  available

http://rc-soar.blogspot.com/

Barcs 230

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Yes, OpenTX is fantastic!!! I'm slowly starting to learn it and am very impressed with it and the power it enables.

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andyharrold
18 hours ago, MikevE said:

 

I use Taranis with Open tx. I have used Frsky since it first came out. It is OK. I have never had a problem with my Taranis, but it is not a Jeti.

I use the eSoar template for f5j.

Be aware that some people have had quality issues with the Radiomaster.

 

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StraightEdge

I have a bog standard X9D+ from 2018.  Does everything I ever need it to do for slope, thermal and some power sports aerobatic stuff.  Swapped the spring-loaded switch over from right to left for DLG launching.  Took me a while to initially get my head around the programming logic, but the printed manual from T9 Hobbysport really helped - and quickly enough learnt to programme basic power models, trad slope soarers and simple RES bungee-launched models, including telemetry etc.  I also use Mike Shellim's template for the Ahi and his recent one for DLG, and will be using his E-Soar Plus for a 2.5m full-house thermal model I'm converting to electric launch.

 

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Futaba for 35 years with no issues, but Jeti for many years now.  It will do anything you need on even the most complex aircraft, and is very well thought out with so many useful features built in as standard.  The ability to run LUA scripts adds even more versatility.  Not cheap, but will last for years and is well-supported.

Simon

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Dick Whitehead

Started with Fleet gear, then moved to Multiplex in the early 1990s (3030 and 4000 for 20+ years).

Jeti DC16 for the last 8 years, and very happy with it. Flying all types of models.

Dick

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I use a Spektrum DX9 for all my silent flight models including some nice F3F mouldies. The programming is easy and I've never had any problems with range or reliability. For my oily IC stuff I have a Radiomaster TX16S and again I'm very impressed with it and would happily also use that in my gliders.

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At the end of the days loads of radios are well up to the job of flying large and complex gliders these days. Opentx, jr, futaba, jeti, etc etc.

Even cheap radios like hi-tech auroras are easily up to snuff for 4 servo wing gliders.

I prefer jeti over Opentx type transmitters because it find it easier to adjust settings when you're actually at the field. Which counts for a lot when things aren't right during a contest. (Your model was flying perfect the last time you flew it...)

Mike Shellim has done a lot for Opentx with his model setups to ease the pain for users. 

I think in terms of contest flying you want to know your tx very well so you understand why and how all the settings work.  You often see people fighting with their tx in my experience, particularly pleasure flyers but even during comps. Obviously this could be obviated by better preparation to a large degree but it's not a professional sport. Often stuff gets chucked in the car from when you last flew it X weeks ago.

Reliability counts as well. I've had the elevator trim fail on a taranis during a comp which wasn't ideal. 

 

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If you want quality without paying through the nose for it I can recommend the Jeti DS12.

A Jeti with a plastic case so it does not weigh a ton. I use this in my F3F models as I had a couple of issues with the X9D.

For my DLG and Ahi I use the X9D.

The Jeti programming is easier to get your head around but the possibilities with OpenTX are limitless if your brain works that way

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thermaldoctor

Agree with everything people have said above Mike. 

Assuming whatever RC system is chosen....2 things will make a big difference so make sure it can do that;

1) Non linear elevator compensation under braking. You will find if you need say 10mm elevator compensation at full brake. Then at half brake you will want something like 7mm or 8mm. Not 5mm (ie linear). But i think most reasonable sets do that.

2) Decent travel curves for flaps so you can make sure trailing edge lines up during camber changes but more importantly you can match both flaps travel under braking. 

I think most half decent sets have this as well but worth checking out.

The rest is down to reliability and range etc but others have answered this with their own experiences

Hope this helps

Neil

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12 minutes ago, thermaldoctor said:

1) Non linear elevator compensation under braking. You will find if you need say 10mm elevator compensation at full brake. Then at half brake you will want something like 7mm or 8mm. Not 5mm (ie linear). But i think most reasonable sets do that.

This is an important facility to have, but I don’t think the example of non-linearity thermaldoctor gives is universal. In fact, I think it is impossible to give any hard and fast rules. My experience suggests that every design is different, and that the compensation required depends on the speed of the plane (and probably several other factors). That means that there is still a role for the pilot whatever the setup.
When I finished setting up the compensation on my Raptor (for example) it was more like an ogive than the concave shape suggested by TD.

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thermaldoctor
27 minutes ago, oipigface said:

 

This is an important facility to have, but I don’t think the example of non-linearity thermaldoctor gives is universal. In fact, I think it is impossible to give any hard and fast rules. My experience suggests that every design is different, and that the compensation required depends on the speed of the plane (and probably several other factors). That means that there is still a role for the pilot whatever the setup.
When I finished setting up the compensation on my Raptor (for example) it was more like an ogive than the concave shape suggested by TD.

Okay. This was not meant to be a general guide on how to set up brakes. 

Just measured my Eternity.

You will want 12mm down compensation at full brake and 8mm at half brake +/- 1mm. 

No ailerons going up. 

If it can do that you are sorted 👌

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1 hour ago, thermaldoctor said:

Okay. This was not meant to be a general guide on how to set up brakes. 

Just measured my Eternity.

You will want 12mm down compensation at full brake and 8mm at half brake +/- 1mm. 

No ailerons going up. 

If it can do that you are sorted 👌

I think that shouldn't be a problem at all going by my experience on OpenTx and the Yoda from Mike Shellim's modified template.

Today I've been flying my two Eclipson 3D printed planes. They are fantastic fun. Flew the Model R for her maiden flight, so nice to get back onto a relatively high performance plane. These are electric power planes, not gliders, btw. Sadly I handlaunched it very badly the second flight and crashed. Oops. At least it's really easy to print myself another one, still feel like a twit though.

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By purchasing an Eternity ,I presume you will be using it for electric launch thermal soaring i.e. F5J etc.

Which means at times you could be flying at the limits of your vision ,possibly along way down wind and low .

I would only trust 2 makes off transmitter in these circumstances Futaba  and  Jeti  .But both must be used with there own receivers .

I know others will not agree with my statement .

But I have witnessed to many incidents regarding range from other sets mentioned .

2 at the last Nats  for example.

G

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