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RustyKnee

F3F Crossed conditions

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RustyKnee

Hi Chaps, I know some of this is slope dependent, but one of my local slopes (Ringstead) is the lazy quick option (you can park on it :)). It suffers badly when conditions are crossed (not unusual) and I can't help but think that crossed conditions are some what likely at a comp. So here is my question, what is the best turn method for the down wind end? At Ringstead it is just so mushy on the down wind end, and its just slows down and wobbles arounnd if you pull any elevator what so ever it seems. Wide open turns keep more speed on, but cover far longer distance. Is it simple trade off by going longer so that speed is msintained to continue the run, or is there better turn approach that is shorter, but keeps the speed on? Is it a specific setup for crossed conditions? Cheers, Stu

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simon_t

RustyKnee said:

Hi Chaps, ...It suffers badly when conditions are crossed (not unusual)... Cheers, Stu
Ask Martin N about crossed conditions at Ringstead...   I love Ringstead, and it is typical of an average southern type slope - Not quite steep enough.  The normal advice for crosswind is to stay high on the 'downwind' leg, allowing you to dive as you turn back for the 'into wind' leg.  On Sunday with the crosswind, it was noticeable to me as CD, that although the models were often sounding as though they were screaming on the upwind leg because their airspeed was high, that the leg time was nearly twice as long as the downwind leg.  Visually I would not have said it was twice as long, because our ears are telling us that the model is going fast!  What it means is that you can climb on the downwind leg and not lose much time - this will pay dividends in being able to get around the turn quicker.  You also need to prepare for the downwind leg not long after crossing the centre of the course. Simon

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RustyKnee

simon_t said:

RustyKnee said:

Hi Chaps, ...It suffers badly when conditions are crossed (not unusual)... Cheers, Stu
Ask Martin N about crossed conditions at Ringstead...
crying.gif
  I love Ringstead, and it is typical of an average southern type slope - Not quite steep enough.  The normal advice for crosswind is to stay high on the 'downwind' leg, allowing you to dive as you turn back for the 'into wind' leg.  On Sunday with the crosswind, it was noticeable to me as CD, that although the models were often sounding as though they were screaming on the upwind leg because their airspeed was high, that the leg time was nearly twice as long as the downwind leg.  Visually I would not have said it was twice as long, because our ears are telling us that the model is going fast!  What it means is that you can climb on the downwind leg and not lose much time - this will pay dividends in being able to get around the turn quicker.  You also need to prepare for the downwind leg not long after crossing the centre of the course. Simon

Sounds Ominous! I didn't see any shiney bits though, so I guess it was all recovered :)...lots of sheep poo though...and thistles.Staying high makes sense, especially with the pingyness of the upwind turn. I found I could gain height and speed in the upwind turns (by attempting a dynamic turn), but I dived down on the down wind run so I was low. Next time I will stay high rather than going low and then pulling up at the end to gain height. Almost like doing a sausage shaped circuit I guess :) That surprises me about the upwind/downwind from last weekend watching others...but like you say the air speed sounds good which is a major feedback. I did have a few down wind turns that killed the ground speed off badly though...I am sure I over pulled those turns.Stu

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