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MikeDaBike

What do you use for balancing your gliders ...

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Rob Thomson

Masking tape and gloves are the order of the day!

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isoaritfirst

My FS4 has lead shot held in place with a soft Balsa former push in tight and backed up with the battery etc, no glue or fixing required.

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Janek

What do you guys do about "tweeking" the COG to your particular flight preference ?, as once you've "fixed" your nose weight it can be difficult to adjust COG rearwards without resorting to Mr Dremel ?

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satinet

I always put any permanent lead so that the CG is slighter further back than the rearmost CG point that is known. It's a bit more difficult if the model is a complete unknown as you don't know what the CG might end up with. If you buy say a freestyler 3 or 4 you know from other people that the CG range is going to be somewhere near a certain point.  You can strap bits of lead to the battery or wedge them in front and make adjustments. 

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oipigface

What do you guys do about "tweeking" the COG to your particular flight preference ?, as once you've "fixed" your nose weight it can be difficult to adjust COG rearwards without resorting to Mr Dremel ?

 

 

 

I make my cast lead nose weight the right weight to bring the CG to the farthest rearwards I think it is ever going to go. Then I use 5g wheel balancing weights for fine-tuning. These come with adhesive backing, so they can be stuck to the battery or anywhere that's convenient. I also use them to find out how much cast lead weight is needed. (Take a look at my thread on Building a Schwing.)

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Austin

You can make adjustments with a small piece of lead glued to a thin piece of plastic or wood that you can move forward or back, then either fix it in place or add/remove from the main weight.

 

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Scram

2 pour some fine sand into a plant pot then put the plasticiene plug in, suspended verticaly (just hold on to it), fill around it with more sand and add water to wet the sand and make it all stick together. gently pull out the slug. this leave sand teh same shape as the slug (coarse sand works, but less well)

 

3 Whilst still wet pour your molten lead

 

Again, this looks v. dangerous to me with high risk of the mould exploding due to vapourised water.  Melting temperature being ~327°C is substantially above boiling point of water.

 

Foundry practice is to make your mould with sand damp and then dry it in an oven.  If you use building sand this will hold together adequately when dried and there is no danger of molten lead flying around.

 

2p.

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John T

I've used 1oz (28g) round fishing weights off ebay, a bag of 5 was a couple of quid.

The first one goes in as is as there about 12mm diameter and usually a perfect fit, the second one gets a bash or two on one side to make it about 5mm flat. If required this can then have its opposite edges filed to make an oval shape. This then goes in second to hold the first one in. If more weight is required the 3rd one goes in once bashed to around 4mm thick which makes it slightly larger in diameter and so on.

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oipigface

Again, this looks v. dangerous to me with high risk of the mould exploding due to vapourised water.  Melting temperature being ~327°C is substantially above boiling point of water.

 

Foundry practice is to make your mould with sand damp and then dry it in an oven.  If you use building sand this will hold together adequately when dried and there is no danger of molten lead flying around.

 

2p.

 

I've made dozens of nose weights this way without any problem. However, I always have the sand just damp enough to hold the sand. It is never sopping wet. 

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mhodgson

Pouring molten lead into damp/wet sand is dangerous, the potential for the lead to 'spit' is always there. It may not have happened yet but one day the sand will be too wet.

When I do it I use dry sand but wrap tin foil around the plug. The foil stays in the sand when I pull the plug out to keep the mould shape. Foil drops comes after the lead has cooled.

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Scram

I've made dozens of nose weights this way without any problem. However, I always have the sand just damp enough to hold the sand. It is never sopping wet. 

Glad to hear you got away with it John.

 

In this case, not worth the risk, to my mind, when all it needs is a little more time to oven dry the mould.

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oipigface

Perhaps I should mend my ways before disaster overtakes me.

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isoaritfirst

Perhaps I should mend my ways before disaster overtakes me.

Oi pig-iron face, hopefully not..

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Jef Ott

Pouring molten lead into... When I do it I use dry sand but wrap tin foil around the plug. The foil stays in the sand when I pull the plug out to keep the mould shape...

 

Had never heard of that before. Thanks for the tip!

 

Jef

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