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evad

smashed my typhoon help and ideas needed

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evad

 I could do with some help and suggestions please

 

 ok so this morning I braved the cold of the shed and took a good look at the damage on my typhoon , the fuselage is in two pieces snapped just behind the wings , both push rods are also snapped in two , I'm going to have a go at repairing this first as a replacement fuse is almost £90 plus postage . the wings are not to bad just one where the skin is cracked behind the wing joiner where the wiring loom connector comes out .  

 

looking at the damage my first problem is how to replace the elevator push rod , as its connected to a bell crank burred inside the tail ? has any one done this and is there a trick to doing it ? 

 

second concern is where the wing joiner passes through the fuselage in the crash the wing joiner snapped in two and has elongated the holes in the fuselage, is this a problem or will this be ok as there is a pin front and back in the wings that locate in holes in the fuselage ?

 

I'll try and get some photos up in the next day or two so you can see the damage , but in the mean time your thoughts would be helpful to me deciding what to do either trying to repair it or just bite the bullet and get a new fuse 

 

thanks Dave .

 

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MikeDaBike

 I could do with some help and suggestions please

 

 ok so this morning I braved the cold of the shed and took a good look at the damage on my typhoon , the fuselage is in two pieces snapped just behind the wings , both push rods are also snapped in two , I'm going to have a go at repairing this first as a replacement fuse is almost £90 plus postage . the wings are not to bad just one where the skin is cracked behind the wing joiner where the wiring loom connector comes out .  

 

looking at the damage my first problem is how to replace the elevator push rod , as its connected to a bell crank burred inside the tail ? has any one done this and is there a trick to doing it ? 

 

second concern is where the wing joiner passes through the fuselage in the crash the wing joiner snapped in two and has elongated the holes in the fuselage, is this a problem or will this be ok as there is a pin front and back in the wings that locate in holes in the fuselage ?

 

I'll try and get some photos up in the next day or two so you can see the damage , but in the mean time your thoughts would be helpful to me deciding what to do either trying to repair it or just bite the bullet and get a new fuse 

 

thanks Dave .

Plus 1 !

 

Mike, also staring at his fuselage ...

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satinet

It might be worth just joining another rod to the snapped push rodd. It's hollow, so it should be easy.

The bell crank is a normal metal clevis attached to the crank. Not easy to open

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Bobbyr

You can splice the hollow pushrod , use a carbon rod in the hollow,

                                          medium cyno on half the rod. Push into rear end pushrod half , and allow to dry , remove the front half from the servo , I used 5 min epoxy on mine to join the 2nd part of the pushrod, don't matter if its a bit splayed on the ends, cos before its all finished you slide some heat shrink tube over the offending break and shrink it up , this acts like a vac bag over the resin around the join . 

     The fuse can be bandaged , Tony fu has a good fuse fix video on his website , that explains how to fix it , and is informative.

 

                   Good Luck

 

                                   Bob

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John T

 

Check post 35 out of the above link, which shows the access hatch to the bellcrank.

 

Just dremmel a similar one in your fuz if you want to replace the full pushrod ?

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bogbrush

Easycomposites uk do a "fishing pole repair kit": ideal starter setup for fuselage repairs.

 

Reccomend the Glider repair lab DVD series from {Paul Naton: Radicarbonart, if you have not seen them yet.

 

you can cyano the two sections together, check alignment, grind back, use a few carbon fibre strands, set in long ways  to splice the two sections across the break and then do a carbon fibre wrap,

 

thinking out loud:

 

..but it may be stronger if you use an internal sleeve first to add strength, (might be a bit fiddly due to the end section of the ballast tube) ie, a lightly wetted out piece of carbon fibre slotted in to the inside of the fuselage, you can then keep it in the correct shape using a piece of rolled acetate sheet. (dont think epoxy will stick to acetate - i may be wrong - check on a test piece!), then when set, remove the acetate, wet it out, (it'll already be a bit stiff) then insert some more resin on the inside of the second section of fuselage, slide the two sections together, thin cyano the break, to hold it tight, then when set, grind back and do a carbon splice and wrap.

 

alignment can be ensured using two long sections of 90 degree "angle iron". to clamp the fuz together

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bogbrush

re the elongated wing joiner holes:

 

you can probably just build this back up with resin and cloth, but check for cracks and if you can, add a bit off strengthening inside the fuz in this area. (probably easier to do this without the pushords in place), need to see some pictures really.

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satinet

The hole that the joiner goes through doesn't do anything other than be a hole. The pegs holes are what carries the forces

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isoaritfirst

It's actually quite easy to build the material back up. Just give it a go there are no right or wrong ways when repairing fuselages as long as it works.

 

I often thought but have never tried it, 

Tack the fuselage together with Cyano as per normal, then cut a letterbox style slot in one side across the crack and slip in a flat piece of epoxy board or ply and glue to opposite internal fuselage side and also glue into the cut slot.

Then carry on as normal by sanding off all the gel coat back to a very thin layer of the original glass, then wrap around the outside with a wetted out bandage of cloth. I usually wett out a 12" (ish ) length of around 1/2" wide and wrap it like you would with insulation tape, making it thiker in the centre where the break is and thinning out towards the ends.

 

Leave it in the warm to dry. You can also wrap over the cloth with stretchy tape such as insulation tape to apply pressure while it dries. This will leave the surface a little ridged but a light sand will soon have an invisible mend.

 

Normally just the outer wrap is enough, provided that everything has been sanded down  until you can see through the glass where the crack is. Basically the cloth will be back to its original thicknes and feathered out onto the sound fuslage sides. adding the board should add a little more if you ar enervous.

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evad

thanks for all the replies to this , some good ideas and tips that I'm going to have a go and follow , I'll get some photos up and you can laugh at my progress 

 

thanks again Dave 

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grj

evad

 

I too have ovalled my joiner hole :o .

 

I filled the worst with a slurry of short carbon fibre tows mixed in epoxy and pushed it into elongation. Once dried, I put the joiner back in the hole (vaselined up) and used epoxy putty to neaten everything off. :thumbsup:

 

G

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Weysoar

For the fuse, tape some straight timber round the fuse at the break, to act as a splint, when you satisfied that all is straight, wet out some strips of cloth and epoxy, place on two long kebab sticks, turn the fuse upside down and place the first strip on the ends of the sticks and introduce into the fuse where the break is, turn them over leaving the cloth inside.  You may need to practice first but it is possible, push them down onto the fuse and then introduce a long balloon and inflate it to keep the laminations in place and pushed together.  The balloon can be pulled off when the epoxy is dry (Wilkco is a good place for mixed packets).

 

 

When all is firm, remove the splint, chamfer the edges of the outside damage to make a 'V' for you to get some more cloth and epoxy into.  Make up some more strips having placed some masking tape round the damage level with the original surface and laminate the strips in place, put some polyester lining material or peelply over the top and epoxy that and get rid of the bubbles, bind it all in place with some masking tape.   When dry, remove the tape and lining material from the top and using 240 (wet) wet and dry, remove excess cloth, fill with filler and polish until smooth and level, paint to own preference, hi build primer is useful!

 

Have fun.

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Janek

Maybe too late, but don't "dremel" a window in the tail, to get to the bellcrank, just use a sharp blade. The skin is thin at that point. This leaves you with a neat (if you do it carefully) "window" that can be taped back on (no strength required).

 

Later versions have a window moulded in.

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evad

Ok the first photos , not sure just how these will come out as its the first time I have uploaded photos on this forum , have not had time to do anything with this yet so am still open to new ideas if you guys have any more to add , thanks

http://www.barcs.co.uk/forums/uploads/monthly_01_2015/post-3223-0-75804700-1422378489.jpg 

 

 

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Weysoar

Another fuse repair method I have used is to place strips of hard balsa inside the fuse to act as the splint and cyano in place, work your way round the inside then go to the repair I mentioned for the outside.  You can either knock the balsa out later and add some glass inside or leave as it is.

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oipigface

The joiner hole looks straightforward to me. The crack above it you can just fix with thin cyano. To fix the chips around the hole, I usually put release agent onto the joiner, make a thick mix of slow-setting epoxy (I usually use West System with 206 catalyst) with microfibers and colloidal silica. Mask around the hole anywhere you don't want the glue to go (Frog Tape is very good). If there are chips inside, then fill them with the mix first, one side at a time. Put the joiner in place, and leave to cure with the filled side down. It is best to take the joiner out before the cure is complete, but be sure that the epoxy won't flow any more. (You can do this by leaving some in the pot.)  Do the second side the same way, and then the surface chips, each time leaving the piece so that the epoxy flows into the chips rather than out of them.

For this method, you need a good release agent, and remember that the size of the hole is not crucial to the performance of your plane. I don't know about the Typhoon, but many joiner slots are deliberately oversize. It is the incidence pins that matter.

I use two methods of fuselage joining:

I) make a spiral of carbon cloth and epoxy just a little bit too large to fit inside the fuselage. You need a spiral so that it can be tightened up to fit inside. It will then apply its own pressure. Make sure you can fit the two halve together accurately in such a way that the fus is straight. Apply a good coat of epoxy (but not too much) inside to two halves where the spiral fits, and more to the spiral itself. Fit the whole lot together, leave to cure.

II) (This is Roger Blake's method) Fit the two halves together so that the fus is true. Fix with thin epoxy. Cut a window in the bottom of the fus about 3/4inch wide and extending an inch or so each side. The window needs to be big enough to allow you to manoeuvre epoxy and cloth or tows into place inside easily. Add cloth or tows using epoxy. (Roger used to use cyano and kicker for this.) Also fix some cloth or tows to the piece that you removed from the window to extend beyond its ends. These will serve to locate it. Glue the window back in place.

Now that the inside is secured finish the outside. This involves grinding out the fractures in a V-shape, so that they can be filled again with carbon and epoxy. Tony Fu has some good pictures of this process on his site (Sloperacer.co.uk)

 

Best of luck!

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evad

thanks for the ideas again guys , i have ordered some laminating epoxy and also 200g carbon flber mat , 

 

Im going to try first to repair the pushrods without having to cut into the tail and get to the clevis 

 

as for repairing the fuselage , its been in the back of my mind to make a carbon tube the just a little larger than the internal diameter if the boom at around 50 mm long , once set cut a slot along its length so it can be squished down a little and glue this into the inside of the fuse to act as a splint and join both sides together again , then just rap a couple of layers around the outside , to be honest I'm not to bothered just what the repair looks like as long as its strong enough to hold up in flight , with my track record its not going to be long before its meets mother earth again rather hard, so spending a lot of time making it look neat and tidy is not really important at this stage. I have read the Tony Fu instructions a few times this week so thank for pointing me to his site .  

 

back to the wing joiner holes , do you think it would be a idea to try and get some carbon on the inside of that crack ? also can someone recommend a good release agent to use on the wing joiner ? I,m not sure what to look for in that department 

 

cheers dave 

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MikeDaBike

thanks for the ideas again guys , i have ordered some laminating epoxy and also 200g carbon flber mat , 

 

Im going to try first to repair the pushrods without having to cut into the tail and get to the clevis 

 

as for repairing the fuselage , its been in the back of my mind to make a carbon tube the just a little larger than the internal diameter if the boom at around 50 mm long , once set cut a slot along its length so it can be squished down a little and glue this into the inside of the fuse to act as a splint and join both sides together again , then just rap a couple of layers around the outside , to be honest I'm not to bothered just what the repair looks like as long as its strong enough to hold up in flight , with my track record its not going to be long before its meets mother earth again rather hard, so spending a lot of time making it look neat and tidy is not really important at this stage. I have read the Tony Fu instructions a few times this week so thank for pointing me to his site .  

 

back to the wing joiner holes , do you think it would be a idea to try and get some carbon on the inside of that crack ? also can someone recommend a good release agent to use on the wing joiner ? I,m not sure what to look for in that department 

 

cheers dave 

I've used vaseline to avoid anything getting glued (I almost used the term "stuck" then decided against it) that shouldn't be although I'm sure there will better advice sooner or later...

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