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Jef Ott

electric free flight design

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Jef Ott

Just one other thought, the advantage of a folding prop, if no undercarriage is fitted, is that every landing, at the short grass venues, is a greaser!

Dad gets particular joy from that aspect.

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Jef Ott

I said earlier in this thread that putting silly grins on the faces of the builders and fliers is what it's all about. I missed a crucial group of people out. 

Took the free flight electric models to my local park after work yesterday, with my sister and wife. Also took a Reno OD glider, knocked up in 10 minutes from 5mm Depron. This was merely to teach my sister the rudiments of trimming. 

Anyhow, the smiles on people's faces (that are not expecting to see aeroplanes flying themselves) are even more important. 

A young lad and his sister were obviously enthralled by the Pixie and Competitor, so I took five minutes to show them the Pixie close up. I let the lad hold the model while I talked through what each part was, then I persuaded my sister to let them play with the Reno.

My sister overheard the lad saying how wonderful it was that the planes didn't have "controllers", and that they just flew themselves!

At the end of the flying session, after collecting the still in tact Reno, the young lad's Mum told us he said he is going to become an engineer and build models the same!

Now that is what it's all about.

Pixie DSC04472.jpg

New aeromodellers DSC04468.jpg

Edited by Guest
Pictures of the joy of aeromodelling, note beaming face under my arm
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PeterT

Great stuff Jef, well done. Perhaps taking a spare chuckie as a gimme in the future might be a good idea.

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Jef Ott
5 hours ago, PeterT said:

Great stuff Jef, well done. Perhaps taking a spare chuckie as a gimme in the future might be a good idea.

Yes, I thought the same.

 

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EssexBOF
On 09/04/2016 at 09:01, Jef said:

I said earlier in this thread that putting silly grins on the faces of the builders and fliers is what it's all about. I missed a crucial group of people out. 

Took the free flight electric models to my local park after work yesterday, with my sister and wife. Also took a Reno OD glider, knocked up in 10 minutes from 5mm Depron. This was merely to teach my sister the rudiments of trimming. 

Anyhow, the smiles on people's faces (that are not expecting to see aeroplanes flying themselves) are even more important. 

A young lad and his sister were obviously enthralled by the Pixie and Competitor, so I took five minutes to show them the Pixie close up. I let the lad hold the model while I talked through what each part was, then I persuaded my sister to let them play with the Reno.

My sister overheard the lad saying how wonderful it was that the planes didn't have "controllers", and that they just flew themselves!

At the end of the flying session, after collecting the still in tact Reno, the young lad's Mum told us he said he is going to become an engineer and build models the same!

Now that is what it's all about.

Pixie DSC04472.jpg

New aeromodellers DSC04468.jpg

This reminded me of 10years ago when i ran a model group down the school and extended this to a days event where they engaged in various things to stir their minds in D&T Dept. I knocked up some kits on the Scout chukkie, which they assembled, then flew on the sports field. Most were pretty poorly made, but one hooked a thermal and disappeared over the swimming pool roof, into the fen area in South Woodham. What seemed to be an army of kids run after it and returned triumphant  with model. Their faces were picture, but I doubt they followed it up, but it did give me great pleasure as well on the day.

Nearly finished the radio assist Ben Shereshaw Cumulus, for  Old Warden, if the weather is OK for 14/15th.

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EssexBOF

Some pictures of the "Cumulus" half size version at 48" span, with radio assist, not keen on chasing after them now, or tree climbing:no:

DSCN0054.JPG

DSCN0055.JPG

DSCN0057.JPG

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PeterT

Very nice too. Has it flown yet?

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EssexBOF
3 hours ago, PeterT said:

Very nice too. Has it flown yet?

Flew it today, flew Ok but not that responsive to rudder, which is a surprise as these sort of models tend to have to much rudder movement causing them to dutch roll. May be the dihedral is less than on most of the free flight models that I have flown with radio.

On the build notes it stated that the rudder was very effective as a FF model so would not need much movement if used with radio. As with a lot of things never believe what they tell you. Have fitted a piece of celluloid to increase the area of the rudder size.. Looks nice in the air. In the latest Sticks & Tissue on line mag, a guy has posted some pictures of his full size version, electric powered, 96" span

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PeterT

Thanks. I must have missed the one in Sticks & Tissue when I read it recently...............and I've deleted the mag. I'll have to go rummaging in the recycle bin to see if it's there :rolleyes:

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Jef Ott

Yes, I saw the Shereshaw Cumulus in the Sticks and Tissue, strange because I don't think I had heard of the design until you mentioned you were building a half size one, on here.

You can't imagine having the space to fly a 96" free flight power model nowadays, unless you live near Sculthorpe or Middle Wallop, I suppose.

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EssexBOF

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1471530

There is a pdf file here showing the original article from 1937!!!!

I think they were big models in those days, due to the engines available with the weight of all the gear for spark ignition.

I did read somewhere that the comps then seem to involve staying up as long as possible and traveling a long way, sometimes as much as 40-50 miles and following in a car. Only really possible in the wide open spaces of the USA

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