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Scram

NCFM Moth build

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Gromit

Thoroughly enjoyed following this build thread, my thanks to Scram for starting it. I've picked up a few hints & tips from contributors to it along the way. 

On a personal note though, its kept me interested in modelling & given me thoughts of entering my workshop again for the first time in many months, thank you for this.

     Stu.    

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Scram

Stu, thanks for your thanks, it has been an education for me too.

I'm pleased to read that you are recovering from your loss and hope to see you on the slopes again ..............  when we get some decent b...... weather.

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isoaritfirst

Did me good as well as the Gulp had been tying around for 4 years awaiting the build. 

Became a nice project through the Christmas period and rekindled my building enthusiasm. So thanks to Jerry from me as well.

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oipigface

 

I haven't been building a Moth, but here is my new Odyssey. I didn't do a full build log, but I was able to keep the weight on this one down to a little over 43oz. (My first Odyssey weighed 52oz!) 1oz of that is due to the lettering on the top surface. If I ever re-cover this, I will try and save that by cutting the letter outlines out of the silver Solartex, before applying the red and yellow Solartex letters.

The letters spell Odyssey in Greek. I like planes to have their names on, and I thought it would be nice to have the double-S in big letters on the centre section. Trouble was that that would leave three letters on one wing and two on the other. The Greek solves this, as well as avoiding any confusion with notorious Nazi death squads. 

A lot of the weight saving was, I think due to the greater accuracy achieved by using a bandsaw to cut apertures in the foam. This was suggested by Mike Evans (isoaritfirst) in this thread, and I found it very useful. Servos are two Futaba S3150's that were in the Pitbull wing I totalled in the autumn. They will just fit within the depth of the wing, so the upper surface has no blisters to accommodate the 6mm arms. Top and bottom of them are foam wedges thickening from 1mm to 2mm. I don't think I could have cut these nearly as well without the bandsaw. Servos are sandwiched between two 1mm GF plates with exterior bearings. I glued the GF plates in with epoxy. Almost everything else was done with Gorilla glue.

All the internal systems are hard-wired. I made my own battery pack for following  Mike Shellim's excellent instructions on his website.

IMG_1013.JPG.2ff054aa1b68d2ded703fd08929

I like wiggles. I used six separate pieces of Solartex to produce these on the underside. Should show up well in a crowd. I've just noticed that I haven't finished trimming the hinges.

569f9fbe1199f_IMG_10071.thumb.JPG.57f2c9

The centre section (without fins fitted). From top to bottom: I) charge lead; II) windows let into top surface to enable pilot lights on the receiver (right) and switch (left) to be seen. Windows are made from FrSky receiver packaging; III) ballast tube access. I found five slugs of lead filled copper tubing in a junk box. Altogether, they weighed a pound, which I think is as much ballast as I would ever need for this. So I taped them together and built a ballast tube around them. The tube is the same length as the centre section is wide. The hatch is a piece of 1/32 balsa with CF cloth laminated onto it. The bolt goes through the central slug to secure it as well as the hatch. The elevons are made of the same balsa/CF. They are a bit too thick, but they are going to have to do until I summon up the energy to build some thinner ones. 

569fa01340776_IMG_10081.JPG.67f3e248471d

Looking forward to maidening this on Lundy in a couple of weeks time!

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ChuckGlider

My Moth is coming along slowly.

 

20160119_223908776_iOS.jpg

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Scram

Looks very smooth  :thumbsup:

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ChuckGlider

Ok guys, I'm after a bit of advice as to what I should do with the fin. So the two balsa pieces joined together do not appear to be big enough.

In one picture, the balsa is laid upon the template so that the join runs along the line shown on the template, as recommended, so as you can see, the balsa is not big enough.:angry:

In the second picture, I have laid the balsa in a different way but as you can see, the balsa still isn't big enough.:angry:

So unless there is a sneaky way of doing this, I may have to get around this by digging into my own balsa stock. Unless YOU know better? :thumbsup:

 

20160120_193300588_iOS.jpg

20160120_193328841_iOS.jpg

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evad

Steve , I had the same problem , all I did was make it as large as i could with the available balsa , something like your second photo 

 

dave  

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ChuckGlider

Well I had some sheet balsa of my own so I decided to use that.

 

20160120_205724597_iOS.jpg

20160120_211557363_iOS.jpg

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evad

looking good steve 

 

dave 

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ChuckGlider

Cheers Dave. Now comes the fun part. Covering it.

My girlfriend bought it me for Christmas. I gave her a choice of three models and she chose the Moth because of it's colour scheme, so she was disappointed when I informed her that it doesn't arrive in the post that colour. So I promised her I would make it the same or similar colours to the one in the picture.

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isoaritfirst

I think the balsa sheet should be cut and rejoined. It shows on the template. The join will break and remake the grain and add strength against warps  

Personally I would hinge the elevons after covering. It makes the hinge line easy to service and repair or replacement of surfaces a lot less hassle. 

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ChuckGlider

The instructions say;

Join the two 3” x 7-1/2” pieces of balsa fin material with thick C.A., creating a single
6” x 7-1/2” piece of balsa. Use the provided Fin Pattern to cut out your fin. Line up the
joint in the balsa with the line on the Fin Pattern and trace the outline of the fin with a
pen. After cutting out the shape, sand the edges round and cover the fin with packing
tape or Ultracote (again, it is not necessary to use adhesive spray on balsa).

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isoaritfirst

 

edit  just looked at your first post a little better, I thought it was supplied as a single piece  should have read it better. can see the join or the grain direction won't work  

i like the fatter look of the gulp fin and have made similar for all my builds. Usually just by cladding either correx or balsa with a few bits of old wing core then sanding in a section. It does add a small amount of weight but I don't try to build my wings light anyway.  I agree about the spray there is no point on small balsa surfaces. 

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isoaritfirst
1 hour ago, oipigface said:

 

Looking forward to maidening this on Lundy in a couple of weeks time!

 

Hope thats not going to turn into an Epic tale John.

 

 

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satinet

The thread title should perhaps be changed to "Foamie Builds". As much as I love my mouldies they are a much of a muchness build wise. It's nice to see something different (what I am saying, next thing I'll be out flying a zagi!!).

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isoaritfirst

It perhaps should also be said that the techniques and tweeks that I have learn't to put into my foamies over many years and lots of builds are small tweeks that add greater benefits when you go racing/dsing and generally mistreating your models... :o

There is nothing wrong with manufacturers suggested methods, for  a general purpose foam build, but building towards your intended purpose is well worth considering.

The build should just be appropriate for your needs, your tools your expenditure and your satisfaction.

For example;

No point in a fantastic surface finish when going combating.

Goop, gorilla glue, tissue, new stuff, 77 glue, spackle etc all have their place (I,ve used them all) but none are better  than the other, they are just different and some are better suited to certain tasks. Some require a lot of work and some level of skill others are quick and simple. 

My Wildthing is X-weave and packing tape.

My Reaper is filled with Gorrila glue and sanded to a very smooth finish before thick new stuff and profilm. Carbon bagged elevons and digital servos. My Gulp is half way between the two. My previous Reaper had goop, spackle, x- weave, new stuff, tissue and profilm..  loads of work.

No point making the model very light at the expense of strength if racing along an edge. No point adding lead balance weight if tape and glues will add strength and weight.

Better to have two models than ballast up a light one, if you are going racing, but better to have  a light one that you can ballast if you just want one fun foamie for sports flying. No point building ballast into a wildthing - just learn to fly it light.

No point in carbon on the elevons unless your going to go Dsing, but consideration to where the control horns are fitted is worth while. Servos close to the fuselage keep the weight central but allow more elevon twist. Tip weight adds stability, useful for a Ds model. Reaper has two ballast tubes each running across the mid mounted servo boxes. adding ballast/strength and tip weight. but a complexity that just isn't needed in a lighter day racing model or a sports model.

No point in top end digital servos if you don't take lots of care ensuring good gearing and tight hinges and linkages,  there is no point on a wild thing but they are needed on an extreem reaper..

Servo boxes are great if you race and are likely to have the occasional hit that could smash a servo gear. They are also very good if you are going Dsing where accurate surface movement is critical and needs to be very finely controlled. They also add life to models that otherwise may well be scrapped after a few seasons due to the foam callapsing. They make life easier and in my book are worth the effort. But I have tools that make the construction of them a very quick and easy option. Building on the dining room table I wouldnt do them this way.. 

 

So what ever you choose to do in a foamie build is fine and lots of the fun comes from looking for solutions to problems - some of which are pretty small - but still fun to try to develop..

 

 

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isoaritfirst
2 hours ago, satinet said:

The thread title should perhaps be changed to "Foamie Builds". As much as I love my mouldies they are a much of a muchness build wise. It's nice to see something different (what I am saying, next thing I'll be out flying a zagi!!).

Scram need to change it perhaps..

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oipigface
7 hours ago, isoaritfirst said:

 

Hope thats not going to turn into an Epic tale John.

 

 

Well, some of those old Greek myths have a happy ending!

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