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GBR flyers in California.


mikef

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Well, Ken made the F1C fly-off and maxed the 6 minute first fly-off with four others - he will fly-off again at 0730 tomorrow.  We are 8 hours behind UK time so more news of that about 1530 UK time.    Alan didn't fly today.

In the F1B flyoff, Mark had a crash under 20 seconds with model one and managed to get his second model away for 257 secs.  You only get 7 minutes to wind and fly.  Mark wound three motors and got two flights away in the 7 minutes.

Four made 6 minutes and Alex Andriukov won a second fly-off from Oleg Kulakovsky with juniors 3rd and 4th.

Ian Kaynes dropped a flight in F1Q and was 8th.

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Mike, the Dark Web is awash with rumours that someone tried a 'Double-Reverse Montague 720 with Pike' ordering opening at Denny's last night. Can you confirm or deny please ?

 

CHE

 

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Sorry Chris, I have no information - We didn't get to the restaurant until quite late.

This morning's fly-offs started at about 0740 and went P, Q, C.  Ken hand a good run and pattern but glided very straight wavering left then right but didn't make even part of a circle.  It went a long way into the oilfield for 6:37, disappearing at the horizon.  Mark and Ken are out searching.  You can see full results here:-

https://faifreeflight.us14.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0c816602b073e2c00ba0cd1d5&id=19e262f408&e=d158abe258

 

 

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Ken's model was found after about 4 hours.  Ken and Mark were joined by Al, John and myself after John had a double attempt in round 3 of F1S and decided to retire.  The model cut and dt'd around one second into the flight on two attempts at the third round.

Ken's altimeter showed it had flown 438 seconds but only 397 seconds of that were visible from the starting point.  It had been tracking right as is went behind a ridge.  It must have tightened the right turn tendency after it went out of sight, because it was well right of line in the oil field.  At one point there were two or three oilfield workers in pick-ups helping with the search.

Ken prepares his model - note the frost on the grass!

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John prepares to fly in F1S.

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Randy Secor won F1P, here's his fly-off launch - made 6:44 off the 7 second run.

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Dieter Paff, F1Q winner did 6:47 in the fly-off.  Here, he warms up his gearbox to thin the grease - very cold morning.

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Clint Brooke’s flew this model - struct and layout is very much ‘F1B style’.  It's resting inverted in a stand.

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No contest today so not out until 0900.  Here's the preflight briefing (AKA banter session!).

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Here's the entrance road on Sunday evening.  Holloway Gypsum had ploughed the mud to the sides to allow a narrow path to dry.  Blurry low light picture.

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Time for some technical details…..   Illustration of the safe way to carry microwaved instant porridge to the field.  Note guard installed on integral spoon in case the porridge splatters.  Walnut Muffin and Blueberry Danish showing approved stowage position in car.  Induction heating from 'phone charger seems not to work?

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Mark is setting up a new F1B with variable incidence wings via two servos in the pylon.  In the picture he is using a bluetooth linked sensitive inclinometer to measure wing angle changes for different flight phase.  The fuselage is clamped and the lack of wind means this is possible outdoors!

Rubber powered models have to deal with a power supply that varies a lot between the initial power burst to the low torque as the final turns unwind.  Variable incidence trims the model for the large changes in speed and lift required from the near vertical launch to the floating glide. Differential incidence allows a degree of roll control at the same time.   Left and right wings (and servo controlled rudder) can be varied in up to 9 steps.

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The timer programming unit uses Bluetooth to communicate with the on-board electronic timer.

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Mark is setting up the model to duplicate the actions of the previous model that had a single step-change in one wing during the climb.  Then he will be able to experiment with more subtle variations from a known starting position to seek more efficiency.  The rudder moves in three steps as before - it's not continuously variable. Discrete tail incidence changes on the previous model are replaced by wing incidence changes.

The timer also controls the prop release which is set to allow a javelin launch to gain height before the prop starts for the climb.

Optimising the two (up to 9-step!) servo movements looks like being a challenge.  All the changes are recorded with a pen and paper notebook - no batteries involved!

Flight testing about to start……

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John's F1S model is not allowed, by the rules, to have moving surfaces.  The single servo operates the dethermaliser (DT).

That's not an airbrake sticking up, it's the removable Bluetooth interface to the 'phone-programmed electronic timer which controls the electric motor via an ESC, the DT time and the DT-on-demand via a radio link. (RDT)

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RDT is via a button on a small arm-mounted transmitter - this is Mark's.  This can save an out-of-trim model before it piles in and allows you to avoid obstacles on the ground - DT in front of or behind the forest .  A model in a booming thermal can be DT'd before the 'max' to save retrieving distance.

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Tuesday.  Another perfect day at the field (5 in a row now) and the Brits are progressing with their test flying.  It's warm and some flyers are in tee shirts and shorts.  Ken, Al and Mark are getting new models sorted and things are going well.  We paused at the ‘Screw Man’s shop’ this morning.  Yuri sells lots of bits for the modellers from the small screws we need, through wire, small tools and machine vices, up to rubber winders and torque meters etc. etc.

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Mark get's the new model away on its first full launch.  Delayed prop release hasn't operated yet in the picture - blades still locked and feathered, a split second later, it will start.

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Ken has been blowing glow plugs at almost one per flight.  Could be a bad batch of plugs but seemed to be alleviated by a reduction in compression.  Another possibility is the fuel which, it turns out, had been stored in a polythene bottle in a closed shipping container for 12 months……..  Goodness knows how hot it would have got in there..

Now he's on fresh fuel and has had 5 runs on one plug!

The last run wouldn't needle properly so Ken has the engine out looking for a suspected pressure leak.  Three bladed folding prop on the geared Verbitsky engine.  You can see the yellow tubing of the pressure bladder in the pictures.

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Edited by mikef
Added, ‘geared’
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Another two shots of the Eugene Verbitsky geared engine this was produced with help from Victor Onufrienko - hence the VE on the crankcase.

Note the closed shutter over the air intake which closes at the end of the run to keep dirt out.  The fitting behind the needle assembly is for cowl attachment.

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North American Cup today.  It's been miserable - cold and very breezy at times.  We started in bright breezy condition and the first round was flown to a 4 minute max - models were going up to 2 kilometres.  Ken (F1C) and Mark (F1B) maxed but Al dropped in (F1C) with a 2:02.  Mark did 1:36 in round 2, going for 3:00.  Ken and Al continued to max.  So Ken joins 4 others in the F1C fly-off.

Ken is flying the model that has its first flight yesterday!

Here's the scene before the start - the weather soon deteriorated.  Maxes were 4, 2.5, 3, 3, 3.

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Overnight rain has turned the entrance road to mud again - driving on this morning (Thursday) was exciting.  There were four events to fly, B, A, C and Q in that order.

Full results are here:-

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1MrA2wchyTEc-6tvpA9uJ4iiKBrZcIi9cNELX1n2u2ds/htmlview

Ken launched slightly left but had a very good engine run and didn't really waste any height in the bunt.  The glide looked a bit off - slightly tight in the turn and too fast but he got 5:13 for third.  This with the model that had its first flight in its current configuration two days ago.

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1995 World Champion, Jeremy Fitch, was initially announced as the B winner but Jeremy thought his timekeeper had watched the wrong model and he was able to produce his altimeter trace to give a somewhat lower accurate time - an honest flyer!

The winning times were :-

F1B Blake Jensen USA 7:24

F1A Jama Daniel Canada 7:24

F1C Yuan Gao China 7:18

F1Q Dieter Paff Germany 8:34

Dieter's winning margin was spectacular.  Jack Murphy in second place did 2:46 and Ian Kaynes got 2:04 for third.  Dieter got really high and into a much nicer layer of air which his model made excellent use of.  He commented that there F1Q class gave a lot of scope for innovation because no single solution to the problem has emerged yet (as it has in the more established classes).

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