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Martin_N

BMFA F3F League 2 SCOTLAND 22nd May 2016

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oipigface

OK. Here's an update after an afternoon spent at Bradford Royal Infirmary. Mark's eye socket is definitely broken, but his eye is entirely undamaged. As far as they can tell, the damaged socket is not supporting his eye correctly, and some reconstructive surgery may be necessary. Exactly what the situation is will not be clear for a week, when the swelling should have subsided. So he's got another appointment next Tuesday, when a decision will be made as to what is necessary, and the op may actually be carried out immediately.

It will take at least six weeks for his vision to get back to normal, but there is a some chance (not great, I think) of permanent damage.

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Greg Dakin

Good to hear that the position is becoming clearer John, I'm sure that a full recovery will be made very soon!

Get well soon Mark - plenty of real ale, canned fish and Wurst to help ease the pain.....

See you on the slopes soon.

All the best,

Greg

 

 

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Dave Elam

I've only just seen this thread and shocked to hear what happened.

Hope all goes okay for you Mark with your recovery and hope to see you back on a slope sometime in the near future.

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Gromit

John, thanks for the update, its good to hear that Mark is in good hands. I hope that you too are ok, how is your hand ? 

I'm certain the whole experience has been a real shock. Remember John, whatever sports, hobbies & pastimes anyone chose's to pursue in life, accidents will always happen.

  Thinking of you both.

     Stu.

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oipigface
On ‎24‎/‎05‎/‎2016 at 11:50, Gromit said:

John, thanks for the update, its good to hear that Mark is in good hands. I hope that you too are ok, how is your hand ? 

I'm certain the whole experience has been a real shock. Remember John, whatever sports, hobbies & pastimes anyone chose's to pursue in life, accidents will always happen.

Hi Stuart,

The damage to my hand was very slight - about 4 sq cm of skin dislodged from the base of my index finger. It is still weeping a little, but it will heal soon.

It has been a shock, yes, but I'm not sure that I buy the line that 'accidents will happen', which I have heard from almost everyone who has commented on the matter, including  the emergency services personnel. For one thing (as you point out) there are choices to be made.

I think there is a discussion that we need to have over safety on the slope, and I intend soon to start a new thread on this forum soon.

Cheers

John

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oipigface

I'm now back home and have had a chance to look more closely at the gear I was using last Saturday. One thing I didn't mention in my original account of what happened is that the air ambulance tried to land in our pits area. The crew seem to have been surprised by effect of rotor downwash on airplanes, bags, cases, clothing etc. left on the hillside. Having tried once, they asked the ambulance guys to move our stuff out of the way, which they did, but not in a very orderly fashion. (I was in a shiny plastic thermal bag trying to keep Mark, who was hypothermic, warm at the time and I didn't know that any of this was going on, but I did search around for missing bits and pieces after Mark had been taken away.) As far as I can tell, there are only two things belonging to me that are still missing, so if you are up at East Lomond, I'd be grateful if you'd look out for them. They are:

i) a transmitter battery

and ii) the foam lining to my transmitter case.

I don't know if these are likely to be together or not, since when the plane hit my transmitter the battery compartment opened and the battery and SD card fell out. Whether the missing battery was the one that was I was using or the spare (which was in my transmitter case in the pits), I don't know. So the battery may be somewhere on the slope, in the pits area in the dip at the top, or it might have been blown away who knows where by the downwash. It may even be with the foam lining still. It is mostly white and green in colour. I remember picking up an SD card and thinking: 'Ooh, someone's lost an SD card', without thinking that it might be me. I now can't find it again, but I suspect that it may be in the pocket of my waterproof jacket, which I left at Mark's place when I set off back home.

Mark is going to see the eye and eye movement specialists at the hospital in Bradford today. Let's all wish him well.

And by the way, many thanks to the little lad who spotted Mark's new Gulp and brought it down to the ambulance. How everybody else missed it I don't know, but the fact that a 60" model in luminous orange and white went unnoticed, is some measure of the chaos that ensued after our accident!

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Dave Elam

John, glad to hear that your hand is improving.

I think you're right to question the line 'accidents will happen'. Yes, in some cases circumstances may well conspire to produce a perfect storm when a completely unanticipated event may happen but there are far more situations when an accident is just down to bad practice and it was always a case of 'waiting to happen'.

Mark is a member of my club and he is now the second member to have had a recent serious facial injury. The first, and now Mark's has really made me think carefully about the dangers involved in our hobby and particularly slope flying.

I'll follow your new thread with interest and hopefully we will all learn from what has happened and try to stop such serious injuries occurring again.

Dave E

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rumbey
17 hours ago, oipigface said:

Hi Stuart,

The damage to my hand was very slight - about 4 sq cm of skin dislodged from the base of my index finger. It is still weeping a little, but it will heal soon.

It has been a shock, yes, but I'm not sure that I buy the line that 'accidents will happen', which I have heard from almost everyone who has commented on the matter, including  the emergency services personnel. For one thing (as you point out) there are choices to be made.

I think there is a discussion that we need to have over safety on the slope, and I intend soon to start a new thread on this forum soon.

Cheers

John

Accidents do happen on the slope John. A few years ago at Roundway we had a gathering prior to a bwlch combat meet and a foamie hit another pilots TX.  The aerial snapped and pieced the eyelid of the said pilot.  Lots of blood but very luckily the eye was undamaged -  It was an unlucky collision but also a miracle the pilot wasnt blinded!

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isoaritfirst

Mark - hyperthermic!

and there's possibly the first thing that we all need to be careful of. 

Some of you may know about a few of us who ventured up pen-y-fan on the wrong day. We also made a wrong decision to sit and picnic in a sheltered spot and wait for the weather to improve. 

Having the right gear to survive if things don't go to plan is a serious   Issue when out in the hills. 

Although, I believe, that we do need to be careful building safety in.

Part of the attraction of many sports, including ours is the element of risk. 

But tHat doesn't mean we should be lax about unsafe practices. 

I often shout and scream at pilots on the mynd if I think their actions are inappropriate. 

We should all be prepared to raise concerns and confront others where necessary. 

All too often concerned fliers pack up and quietly walk away. 

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oipigface
34 minutes ago, isoaritfirst said:

Mark - hyperthermic!

Well, hypOthermic, actually, Mike, strange as it may seem for one who is famous for wearing only a tee shirt in coldish weather. He had of course been clouted hard by a heavy object, so he was not his usual self.

Immediately after the accident, he lay down on the slope in the wind, and complained of feeling sick and being in extreme pain. I was wary of trying to move him out of the wind, because I remembered from a first aid course I did many years ago, that one should not try to move people with physical injuries. I did persuade him to lie on his side, so that if he was sick he wouldn't choke. I went to the pits out of the wind to phone for an ambulance (about 5 minutes), then I went back to him. He was reasonably well dressed in his waterproof lined jacket, and with waterproof overtrousers. He didn't want to move out of the wind (or at all), so I just stayed with him for about 10 minutes, then went to see if the ambulance was in the car park. It was, so I went back to tell him I would have to leave him to go down to the ambulance. Ran down the hill (10 minutes), talked to ambulance crew, who decided that the only thing for it was to walk up to him. They had a big backpack of stuff and a defibrillator to carry, but the guy with the defibrillator was clearly struggling so I took it off him about a third of the way up. I guess that all of this took another 25 minutes. So he was reasonably well dressed, but out in a strong wind with no cover, for at least 50 minutes. He was concussed as well. I don't know what the temperature was, but a couple of short showers, one of them quite heavy, came through while I was going down and back again, which can't have helped. One of the items in the backpack was one of those shiny silver thermal blankets that they dish out at the end of marathons. The ambulance crew, after doing various tests, and establishing that he was hypotensive, suggested that I cuddle up to him, while they wrapped us up in this blanket. That's how we spent the next 45 minutes or so before the air ambulance arrived. It was the paramedic in the air ambulance who said he was hypothermic. The blanket wasn't very good protection, but it was something.

It is almost certainly the case that hypotension makes it more difficult to stay warm, so that even reasonably well clothed it is possible to become hypothermic in a strong wind.

I don't know if I did everything according to best practice, but I did what seemed sensible at the time, then followed instructions after help arrived.

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Andy_B

sorry to see this John , Only just got back from vacation . Hope both you and Mark make a full and speedy recovery .

 

 

Andy.

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oipigface

Another trip to Bradford Royal Infirmary. We were told that today was the day when Mark may have had the surgery to put his eye socket back together, but it was not to be. The fracture is a bit unusual in that it extends further back into the socket than most do. This means that the surgeon will be working closer to the optic nerve than is often the case with a greater danger of damage. They are therefore not treating this as the usual 'punch up on a Friday night' kind of injury. The senior maxillofacial surgeon at Bradford is going to do it himself, using a 3D printed implant to replace the floor of the socket instead of the usual titanium mesh. Mark says: 'They are going to print me a new face!'

It takes a few days to program and print the implant using the CT scan output, and there is still apparently some swelling that makes a little further delay desirable. We are told to expect the surgery to be done within the next four weeks.

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Lundylynda

Just to say how sorry both Joe and I were to hear about Marks unfortunate accident- sending our very best wishes to Mark and hope he has a speedy recovery x See you both soon for some R & R on Lundy I hope. 

Lynda

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George Young

Hi John. Sorry to hear Mark's recovery is going to take a bit longer than you were expecting. I hope Mark isn't too uncomfortable and that you both get out on the slopes again before too long.

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chiloschista

Hej,

just read now about Mark accident. So sorry for that Mark and John!

But let see things from a positive side, for a 3D printing addicted guy = : D

My best wishes to both!

Ric

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oipigface
On ‎26‎/‎05‎/‎2016 at 12:07, oipigface said:

As far as I can tell, there are only two things belonging to me that are still missing, so if you are up at East Lomond, I'd be grateful if you'd look out for them. They are:

i) a transmitter battery

and ii) the foam lining to my transmitter case.

Battery checker is missing as well.

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frankoneleg

Mark its good to hear your on the mend just 1 thing is this what you look like now?

 

 

get the doc that fixed Redsell's thumb to sort you out and you will be unbeatable

 

frank  

a84e7a1ab2166496fcc73090043bdc79.jpg

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oipigface

Mark and I went to St Luke' Hospital in Bradford yesterday for pre- operative consultation with the surgeon. Mark goes under the knife on Friday week. Because of the danger of damage to the optic nerve, the surgeon doesn't think he will be able to replace the entire floor of the eye socket, so there may be some remaining displacement of the eye. If this turns out to be the case another operation in about 6 months time will be offered.

For those interested in the technical details, the implant is printed ceramic, so is very high tech. This kind of printing has only been available for a little over a year. Some details here http://www.formceram.de/en.html?gclid=CPaez8OhlM4CFYQcGwodU6oGOQ.

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chiloschista

Wow John,
that's amazing.
I really hope everything goes the best way it can. Best wishes to Mark
Ric

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oipigface

Mark goes in for his surgery tomorrow. I'm sure you will all want to join me in wishing him well.

John

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