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Scram

Wizard nose job

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Scram

Having decked my Wizard Compact X-tail during an F3F at Long Mynd, some years ago now, seeing as there has not been much in recent times, I think it's time I got around to sorting it.

A "temporary" solution arrived in the form of an older even V-tail fuselage donated by a friend of AndyH but I managed to detach the nose from this at the CoC comp last year!!  I parted the nose from the main fuselage and cleaned up the joint so's it would go back together but then thought this is a good opportunity to use the good grey nose as a pattern to make a replacement for the shattered yellow one,

IMG_4057s.thumb.jpg.5cd902800903fd0448a3498eb88fe5d6.jpg

which I have (possibly mistakenly) sawn off the red fuselage..

IMG_4058s.thumb.jpg.94d9b1b80dbd2638baa7907e99dfaa30.jpg

Only problem, I have little idea how to go about making a new nose section to slot into the red fuselage.  However I do, I think it would be best not to remove the bit of the old nose which will nicely reinforce this part of the fus.

Suggestions or instructions eagerly awaited  :yes:

This nose is clearly made as a 2 part moulding - top and bottom - joined along the longitudinal line on the grey nose.

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Hi Jerry,

Can be a bit expensive for a one-off because you need to lay up fiberglass over the grey nose first, then lay up the glass/carbon etc into the moulds you  just made. The grey nose is being used as a 'plug' for the process.

One way is to first arm yourself with the materials, Mirrorglaze wax (or PVA release), Plasticine, 6mm ply,  gel coat, Glass cloth or chopped strand mat, resin & catalist, final layup materials as needed for the finished nose and masterbatch (if you want the finished part to be coloured via the gelcoat (no need to paint it).

Step 1/ cut the split line joint shape out of a rectangular piece of 6mm ply so it is a good fit around the plug nose. Make it about 25mm larger all round to give a flat surface to work to. varnish, paint or otherwise seal the grain of the ply and make is as smooth as possible.

2/ Use the mirrorglaze wax as directed on the plug and ply plate (several coats with enough time to fully harden between each buffing), Or use the PVA release which doesn't give such a smooth surface in my experience. This is to prevent the resin sticking to the grey nose and ply. Don't skimp on the wax type. Normal household wax will ensure disaster!

3/ To do the bottom mould first; fit the grey nose into the aperture cut in the ply, ensuring the prepared surface of the ply is aligned with the joint line on the grey nose. Use plenty of plasticine all the way round on the Top side (opposite to the side you are making) of the plug to support it. The aim is to make a 'liquid' resin tight seal between the ply plate and the grey nose you are using as a 'plug'. It may be necessary to add some plasticine to the bottom side of the joint too using a modeling knife or other flat metal pallet knife like tool. Ensure this bottom joint is nice and square with no excess plasticine. This will ensure a good 'flash free' moulding on the final parts.

4/ Apply another coat of release wax to be sure of a good release of the layup you are about to apply to the plug. If you screw up on this it will probably destroy the nice shiny grey nose!!

5/ Support the prepared plug, bottom side up, on your building board which is covered with polythene sheet. Mix up a small amount of gel coat and hardener, enough to apply a thickish layer to the ply and plug half and apply it. Wait for this to go off. (the surface will remain sticky to the touch but not wet).

6/ Mix your layup resin and apply your fiberglass cloth or chopped strand mat to the plug and ply plate. Several layers will be needed to ensure the mould will be thick enough not to distort when using to make the final part. Ply ribs could be added after the first couple of layers to the outside of the mould, adding stiffness. These are attached with the resin and glass layup. All this should be done at one time, with one mix of resin.

7/ Wait for this to harden. If you have a lot of overhang around the ply plate it can be trimmed off with a Stanley knife when the layup is in a green state (resin gone off but not fully hard).

8/ When fully hard, remove the ply plate and plug, remove all the plasticine, clean up the surface of the plug and rewax it thoroughly. Also wax the mould you have just made, especially the flat mating surface.

9/ Put the plug back into the bottom mould and wax again!

10/ repeat the layup process of the top mould as per the previous bottom mould.

11/ Before splitting the mould and removing the plug, drill some holes through the flat plate area to ensure they can be bolted together accurately for future alignment of the two halves.

12/ Wax the two mould halves thoroughly.

13/ Basically repeat the process by laying up the final top and bottom parts into the two moulds. Use the masterbatch colouring into the gelcoat if required.

13/ Once set and trimmed, the two moulds can be bolted together with the top and bottom parts inside. Add strips of carbon/ glass cloth strips and resin along the joint line through the rear opening of the moulding. A modeling balloon can be inflated within the mould to ensure the strips are compressed against the joint line of the moulding.

The resultant part will be an almost identical copy of the 'plug' meaning you will need to remove the remnant of the previous nose, or modify the 'plug' before making the mould.

This is a basic process description which does not ensure the lightest result, but it will work.

I'm sure there will be others that can add to this.

Worth trying on something less critical / simple as a tester first! Maybe something that is disposable just in case.

Good luck

Neil P

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Scram

Thanks very much for that Neil.  A very comprehensive set of instructs  :thumbsup:

The description of making the bottom and top mould, lining them to make the bottom and top halves, trimming them flush at joint line, the bolting them together and adding jointing glass/resin is the bit I had not got a handle on.

Now I understand how to do it.  I need to get some more materials beside the glass cloth, carbon cloth and laminating resin that I have.

Cheers.

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Pleased to be able to share a little knowledge as you did for me on the Taranis a couple of years back if I remember correctly.

Best regards

Neil P

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