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andyharrold

LiIo battery storage voltage

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andyharrold

I have recently bought a glider with LiIo batteries installed.

I charged them up fully the night before flying but then the wind direction changed so I had to cancel my day at the slope.

Do LiIo batteries have any special storage needs or can I just leave them and then give them a top up before I next fly , in a few weeks time?

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satinet

In thoery they, and other lithiums, should be stored at a lower voltage long term. So if you don't fly it for months it might be worth using the storage setting on your charger if it has one.

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Andy Harrold

Cheers Tom, hopefully I will get back on the slope within a fortnight so will just treat it like a lipo.

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Woodstock

I have some gliders left at a hotel in the Italian Alps.  I was there at the beginning of the month, and took extra new LiPo's with me. Turns out this wasn't necessary, as both planes were ready to fly without any charging, even though they had been left in a fully charged state 12 months ago.. LiPo's rock.

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Scram

mmmm.

My understanding is that maximum safe voltage for LiPo's is temperature dependent, and it decreases with decreasing temperature.  Therefore if you charge fully (4.2v/cell) at a nice warm temperature and the battery temperature falls ........ because of a lower ambient temperature then this maximum allowable voltage may be exceeded resulting in unfortunate circumstances.   :bye:

So, if you keep the LiPo's somewhere nice n warm, no problem but if kept in a cold garage or shed, could be bad news.

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Andy Harrold

My previous new glider is allowed to live in the house! Speak to you soon Jerry. 

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Woodstock
20 hours ago, Scram said:

mmmm.

My understanding is that maximum safe voltage for LiPo's is temperature dependent, and it decreases with decreasing temperature.  Therefore if you charge fully (4.2v/cell) at a nice warm temperature and the battery temperature falls ........ because of a lower ambient temperature then this maximum allowable voltage may be exceeded resulting in unfortunate circumstances.   :bye:

So, if you keep the LiPo's somewhere nice n warm, no problem but if kept in a cold garage or shed, could be bad news.

The LiPo's I was referring to above were kept in a basement which is cold in mid-summer, and even colder through the winter skiing season (Hotel is a ski resort in winter)! Them's tuff stuff!

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satinet

The problem isn't storing lithium batteries at low temperature. Otherwise they would burst in to flames if you put them in the freezer, which obviously doesn't happen. 

The problem lies in charging them when they are below zero. It's a well known problem with power tools, which often get stored at low temps. Indeed I've had chargers refuse to charge batteries last winter as they have a temperature sensor built in, to prevent cell damage (not fires).

As Chris says you are probably fine to store cells fully charged. Each to his own.

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