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John1

Wire stripping

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John1

Newby!

Q1 of 2 Each servo ext wire is barely 1mm thick, what's the sure fire method of stripping these, I can find tools but is there a definitive tool for the job?

Q2 of 2 Wings often have a degree of curve, hand sanding the block of wood has lead me to a rather random leading edge, are planes the solution to an even leading edge on 1 to 2 metre gliders?

IMG_2052[1].JPG

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Bernie Jones

Q1 small wire stripper is best not many strands in there so you don’t want to be cutting any. 

 

Q2 can’t beat Permagrit tools they do a long sanding block that will last you years 

https://www.permagrit.com/sanding-blocks/

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oipigface

Hi John,

      Welcome to the weird and wonderful world of wire! I don't know about a 'definitive' method for stripping, but I have used the tool in the following pictures successfully for several years now. I don't know who makes it - there's no manufacturer's ID or trade mark on it, but is robust and reliable, and removes the sheathing without removing wire as well, and will remove just as much or as little length as you want. The little steel device held on by the Phillips screw (Pic 2) controls the length of the cut.

Pic 3 is supposed to show the five different cutting edges. I've been using the big one recently for 2.5mm2 wire. The smallest one is right for servo wire.

IMG_0297.thumb.JPG.607542bb7bbd217a99bfa08b4a13eb63.JPGIMG_0299.thumb.JPG.d47af2f44c3ed1af527b8caeed904f0f.JPGIMG_0298.thumb.JPG.dccc130c0eae4b3371c462af362430f1.JPG

Here's me stripping some servo wire (Pic 4). The white is in the smallest cutter with its end up against the steel length gauge. Pic 5 shows the uniformity of length that cann be achieved with careful use.

IMG_0303.thumb.JPG.4b70a1a08341c8395bfe258350d49f58.JPGIMG_0316.thumb.JPG.9f0ff9311ff065084fbb31d5705a1c96.JPG

As far as sanding LE's is concerned - always use a sanding block! Always!!

I use Permagrit ones mostly. They are expensive, but they seem to last forever. The one in Pic 6 has been cleaned with Nitromors a couple of times. It is probably 10 years old and still as good as new after it has been cleaned. A cheaper alternative is simply to take a block of wood or a dowel, and glue a piece of abrasive paper to it. I usually use cyano when I do this, which is only when I need to sand a concave surface.

IMG_0300.thumb.JPG.339a966d0d9bf120cb812a9b617d8dee.JPG

The key to sanding LE's (I think) is always to go very slowly, removing small amounts at each pass. Each pass should cover the entire length of the whole wing, otherwise you will forget how you got to where you are. When I say the entire length of the wing that's what I mean. For two piece wings do one pass along the first half, then one pass along the other. Look at both to make sure they are the same. Begin with a razor plane - David razor planes are classics! When you get close to the shape you want switch to the sanding block. Another thing that can be helpful is to make a template or templates out of cardboard to indicate the required finished shape.

Just take it easy and you'll easily get good results. Have fun.

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pete beadle

Hi John1

I don't know about surefire, but the wire strippers I have used for the last 5 years or so have never let me down  - see pic 

They have never  cut into strands of wire either

BTW the strippers on the left I imported from the USA and cost £29.99 plus shipping five years ago

The pair on the right, I bought from Component Shop at the ME, and were £2.99, I think, (from China).....they work fine as well

Yer pays yer money etc😀

Regards

Pete

BARCS1702

wire strippers 004.JPG

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EssexBOF

Although I have a wire stripper, tend to use razor blade and roll the wire along the edge LIGHTLY, then roll the loose piece of wire off, so as to wind it around itself. As an aside you can still buy double edge blades in super markets, but only stainless steel, not as good as the old Gillette Blue carbon blades, as to keeping their sharpness. Still have some of them which I have collected over the years.

As to sanding L Edges, I rough them down, then use the sponge type sanding blocks that DIY shops sell, in various grades. Find these will keep a curve better, as they take the high points off, so keeping a round shape.

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satinet

I use ones as pictured by Pete. It perfectly strips the wire without damaging the cores.  I can't see a reason to use anything else. 

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satinet

with regards to the leading edge, a very handy tool is the david plane.  Plane down first then sand. Templates for the shape help, which are on some plans.  A very handy tool for traditional model building.

surfboard-shaping-david-plane.jpg

 

I echo the above comments about permagrit sanding blocks, they are the dogs whatsits. 

 

 

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isoaritfirst

I use a long alu extrusion, I think it came off an old kitchen cupboard door. I do have a few of differing lengths. longest is around 18".

I buy https://www.wickes.co.uk/Wickes-Aluminium-Oxide-Flexible-Abrasive-Fine-Sandpaper-Roll---5m/p/154888

in various grades, rip it to length and for quick sanding jobs just hold it around the extrusion, if more accuracy is needed I stick it on with Scotch 77 spray.

Works great - cheap and replaceable. 

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Stormeflyer

I like to use this type of wire stripper that can be pre set first to ensure not one single strand is cut by mistakeFCE6D21C-B877-4501-80DF-9AE69B3A3568.jpeg.10d60aaf329c0f39cef5fad9f6b273e9.jpeg

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