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Tony

Anybody know how we did in the prelims?  Trawling through glider score from last week will take quite a while to do.

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Nicholls

No Brits entered the prelims. The first day's results not up any where and unlikely to be soon from reports

 

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Tony

Cheers for the heads up it seems they've problems with wi-fi looking at the USA team thread so I expect the scores to be up late as you said

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wixy

F5J UK  Facebook  

Nick Wu  Facebook 

France F5J Facebook

lots off Video etc from these groups 

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Tony

This is my new best sport tv channel (Facebook link)! Watching live coverage is fascinating haven't managed to spot anyone with a UJ flag on a shirt, not sure what the team apparel is though

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Tony

Results are heating up now and the top pilots are pushing to the front, 50 and 51 for two of ours so far.

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Tony

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Tony

Gotcha, well done Steve. I was just on looking at the latest rounds not got to looking at the results yet. 

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cirrusRC

Don't forget all the scores are on gliderscore too.

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DaveH

I enjoyed the video coverage of this comp, particularly with the excellent commentary from Lana.     From the videos, the comp looked to be well run with lots of helpers from the local community.    Well done to all involved.      

The low starts attempted and often capitalised upon were something of a revelation to this newbie to F5J,  I may even come down from my usual 140m+ start height in future comps...     

 

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thermaldoctor

Hi

I will get something together in the next few days and post it here.

It was a great WC and the conditions were quite diverse at times.

Team GBR flew very well and also got on well as a team. 

It was the first ever championships that we saw Dynamic Soaring used to fly out a slot. A swiss pilot took a very low launch in tricky windy conditions and DS'd the trees for 10 minutes.

I will upload something soon

Neil

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thermaldoctor

Okay so where on earth to begin? Well lets start with the travelling. Senior pilot Ian Duff decided to drive and ferry it and arrived on the Thursday before the event. Thankfully he had a good trip in his camper van and was able to take some useful team items such as composite repair kit, tent equipment and electrical plugs & sockets. The rest of the team travelled from Manchester airport to Bratislava airport and decided to hire a big 7 seater people carrier that we knew was able to take 3 model boxes and 4 people as we had tested it in the UK. Wrong. We got a 7 seater but way smaller than the one advertised so at approx 1am Saturday morning we collected the car and then struggled to get all the kit and people in. Luckily the girl at global hire said she would be staying open until 3am but when I went back to ask if they had another 7 seater (ie the one advertised) available she had closed up and gone home. So.....we got the 3 model boxes in the hire car with Steve driving and I got the rest of us a Taxi to Trnava and the hotel. Although a bit more expensive it was good that the taxi driver knew exactly where to go and Steve could simply follow rather than having to navigate in the dark in a strange country.  We got to the hotel approx 2.30am and lugged all our luggage up to the rooms and left the models in the car. Starving and knackered we went to bed ready for practice on the saturday.

Next day we woke 8am to hot still weather. We stayed in the Holiday Inn Trnava and were greeted with a superb full english breakfast which kept Steve happy. Already team moral was good with the usual banter from Rick and Josh and at 9am we were all looking forward to getting our heads down practicing and getting acclimatised to the conditions and trimming the models. Ian, Steve and Rick were happy doing their own thing so I worked with Josh our junior pilot on some landings and general trimming flights. 

We watched the Trnava cup fly-offs (the pre-event) and witnessed some very good but not out of our reach flying with the winner Roberto Bonafede launching sub 30m in all 3 fly-offs to win it in fine style. Then we carried on practicing.

In the lead up to and during the event Palo Lishack was on duty as FAI official for the random testing of altimeters - just like they used to do with towline length. I know Palo and had been in touch with him beforehand as he was offering free testing of all altimeters so you could get a sealed sticker over your altimeter saying it complied and therefore could never be pulled for random testing. But in reality he was hard to track down and as we had arrived quite late to the event, when I did see him he was always very busy with the organisation so unfortunately in the end we didn't get ours pre-tested. But interestingly he did note that after testing over one hundred or so he only found only 1 altimeter out of calibration by 2m. Everything he had tested beforehand and all the random checks they had done during the pre-contest showed all altimeters were bang on. Therefore I was happy to return the altimeters to our pilots knowing we should be okay and i didn't want them fitting them in last minute just for the sake of a hanging on for a voluntary pre-test.

After a long hard day at the field we retired back to the hotel around 8pm. Just enough time for a 15 min shower and clean up each and then out into town for some food. Thankfully the Holiday Inn was not far from the town centre and after tips from the Dutch we found a great and cheap place to eat which was our first proper meal since friday morning.

Sunday dawned dry still and warm so up at 6.30am, breakfast 7am and to the field by 9am. We planned more practice flights until model registration in the Afternoon. Model registration was all day but Team GBR were scheduled for 2.15pm at workplace so we had a free morning. AND.....it turned out....we had a free afternoon as well! Model processing was running way way way behind schedule for some reason. Like 5 hours behind. I have never experienced this sort of delay?! Unfortunately, although being Team GBR we should have been as 'G' as it was done in alphabetical order but we were under 'UK' for model processing so right at the very end with USA and Ukraine. So what should have 2.15pm turned out to be something like 7.15pm. It would have been even worse but thankfully we had all our FAI paperwork and registration documents already filled out so the organisers wanted us to jump the queue to speed things up (LOL) as a few teams hadn't. This didn't go down at all well with team Norway who were before us in then schedule and should have gone first but none had filled out their paperwork but thankfully their anger was soon turned away from Team GBR and was redirected towards the  organisers 🙂

Just for reference for pilots never having attended an FAI event - model processing is a process all teams, pilots and models have to go through to ensure everything is above board and complies with the regulations. Some of it is justified but some of it can be a bit silly with commercial model designs such as maximum wingspan and minimum loading etc as they all comply but still you have to do it. What they also do is apply model identification stickers to each part of each model. Every pilot is allowed to enter 3 complete models. An 'A' model a 'B' model and a 'C' model. You can use any part of any model and mix and match whatever you like as long as it has got an FAI A, B or C stamp. You are not, for example, allowed to introduce a spare part from an altogether different model that has not gone through scrutineering and does not have an official FAI stamp on it. You are allowed 3 models, and/or any combination of those 3 models and that's it.

As if a 5 hour delay was bad enough at 8am was the team managers meeting. This was a crazy tiresome affair with a lot of heated debate and arguing over legislations already in place over many years such as insurance, etc and really did not need discussing but of course there were some totally new teams to FAI such as Argentina and Kazikhstan so you could argue it was excuseable. Anyway after a battering 1 1/2 hours the team managers appeared out of the meeting tired, battered and bewildered. I had said to the team to pack up and get themselves back to the hotel asap so they could get back at a decent time as I could easily get a lift back to the hotel with another friend/TM. But I was happily greeted with "Oi....over 'ere" and they had actually waited for me.

So approx 9.30pm we retired to the hotel, pushed our shower allowances down to 10 mins each and then raced into town to get some food. The food was generally very nice and at good prices. Enough to keep all the team happy. Apart from the first night Ian joined us from the campsite to eat out with us which was nice - a taxi was only 12EUR and it was really good to eat, talk and laugh as a team. But with 10.30pm fast approaching and the worlds starting 9am next morning we all sloped off pretty quick to get our heads down in readiness for the first few round of the WC.

To be continued.....

 

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Tony

Great report looking forward to the next instalment. I followed you all everyday and of course everybody else, a really great competition from a spectators point of view. Videos of all the rounds were on Facebook.

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cirrusRC

If you've not already seen them.  Jure Pecar's videos are excellent.

 

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Tony

Yes I regularly watch his work

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thermaldoctor

Okay so here's the start of the flying and competition report bit from the F5j World Champs....

The organisers decided to run juniors first so up first we had young Josh Lloyd entering into the mix for Team GBR and a very steady fine performance from Josh got him a highly credible 959.2 in very good company. Anyone having never witnessed junior F3j and now these days F5j juniors would be gobsmacked. These young pilots have no fear of failure, no fear of breaking stuff (well some do...) and have an awful lot of air reading and piloting skill. Both Steve Haley and myself talked of this over a few beers and we came to the conclusion (rightly or wrongly) that yes the Juniors are very skilled and they have the right sort of support and encouragment from elsewhere but we felt one of the contributing factors is that they don't have their heads cluttered with everyday crap like many of us seniors do - paying the mortgage, paying for the models, keeping a job, earning money, trying to book time of work to go to the WC, family pressures and commitment etc They are often backed up by some of the best seniors in the National Teams but even so their perfomances are staggering for their age and every single junior that flew were amazing. In fact age aside can easily hold their own with the seniors. Take French Junior Adrien Gallet - he won Hollandglide 2019 and beat everyone including an awful lot of seniors. So well done Josh. 

In seniors we started with Steve. On the flight line and with approx 3 mins to go (we were starting in one of the further away lanes), the Prestige 2PK was connected and returned an ESC error signal and a prop blip. Trying to reconnect it did the same again so we switched to No. 2 model Explorer. No. 2 Explorer was switched on and no ailerons! We all looked at each other......WTF?!  After aileron plugs fiddled with and tip panels back in place (forget the bloody tape) we launched. Only seconds late. But in all the hurry and confusion as to what had just happened, the Explorer was launched correctly inside the safety corridor as it was in the process of being thrown and released, but the launchers front foot finally came to rest over the safety corridor line. As we all started to calm down and concentrate on the flight and relieved that it wouldn't  be too bad at all and watched the model climb away under power we started to hear the timekeeper shouting "zero zero" as she thought we had made a safety corridor infringement. Although the timekeeper girls did a really great job throughout the week and we couldn't have run the contest without them, bear in mind they would often ask pilots to let them know when their pilot was landing so they could stop talking with their friends or come off their phones in order to witness the landings...!  But either way we were called for a safety corridor infringement and faced a ZERO. As Team Manager i spoke to the organisers and spoke to the jury, I then politely argued with the organisers and argued with the jury but to no avail. I spoke personally to Vladimir Gavrilko (who I know well and was head of jury) and the timekeeper girl in question quietly and in private as it was getting quite heated outside the CD's area but unfortunately no......the timekeeper was adamant (in error in our opinion) so Vladimir had to go with the evidence of the timekeeper. With very heavy hearts and a British stiff upper lip and  a shaking of hands with timekeeper and Vladimir to show no hard feelings we had to take a zero for Steve ;-(

The sarcastic slow clap from Benedikt Feigl did not help matters but Karma took care of that one for us.

Ian and Ricked kicked off with very solid reliable high 890 performances taking slightly higher launches to make sure of their times and thinking of the long week ahead. Particularly with strong winds forecast for the tuesday and wednesday, we all felt Monday was a banker day. And many other teams felt the same......In fact the eventual team No 1 gold medalists New Zealand had this tactic from day one and held it all throughout  the competition. None of their 3 pilots (from memory and from post reports) scored 1000's individually as they were playing safe and playing the long term gain and trading launch altitude for consistency. It was the hare and the tortoise scenario and they came out on top to win by quite a margin so it was the correct tactic.

The technical problems that we faced in R1 were (on the face of it) self inflicted but in actual fact were a series of problematical components compounded by the organisational aspect of the event that led to what transpired out on the flight line. Let me explain......

Specifically for the event, Steve had bought some new extension leads/flyleads to make sure all would be okay for the WC. Existing leads were okay, but old,so new ones were bought as replacements to (ironically) prevent any problems or failures. The Prestige start up failure was due to a faulty brand new fly lead between AMRT and receiver. The Explorer was the same problem but with ailerons leads.
This equipment error was compounded by the fact that at this championships (and unheard of in all our championship experiences between us) we had to break down the models each night and put them back in their boxes. They then had to go back to the hotel or stay in the cars overnight until building up again next day. Normally there is a full size hangar or purpose built marquee for this but at Trnava there was not. Normally at a WC you put your models together and leave them built until the end. We could have left them in the event shelters put up by the organisers but after a major storm rampaged the Trnava airfield in the week leading up to the WC and ruined all the tents we were all asked at the TM meeting to take down our shelters each night and build them up again each morning. And in all fairness there were more overnight storms that would have damaged models and tents....

So overall the schedule went something like this....finish flying 7pm. Get back to tents and pack all 12 team planes away and get them in cars, 7.30pm take tents down and pack all away. 8.00pm get in car and get back to hotel. 8.15pm get back to hotel 10 min shower allocation each ready to walk into town and eat by 9.00pm. Finish food by 10pm and a beer or two each max and then back to hotel by 11pm for heads down and 6.00am alarm call, 6.45am breakfast, arrival at airfield 8am (latest) to get all 12 team planes and tents back up and operating ready for a 9.00am start...!  So we would have expected to simply build up the planes, help build up the tent up and then take the planes out ready for flying but unfortunately in Steves case faulty/dodgy servo leads/flyleads cost him. Something you would never have expected. And they were bought specifically to replace/eliminate any problem with existing wiring. But lesson learnt - when each plane is put together turn on and test. The problem was there was a lot more to do each morning in Trnava than normal...

 

 

 

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