Jump to content
Tony

WANTED - Radio Controlled Thermal Soaring by George S

Recommended Posts

Tony

Agh, sigh of contentment as books have arrived Jef. Time to get on a brew and chill for a while.

£75 is quite steep Brian!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
EssexBOF
3 hours ago, Tony said:

.£75 is quite steep Brian!

You bet. Wish i had got that price when I sold the ones I had :whistle:

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tony

Unfortunately I never got to read your book, wish I had. No doubt as you've mentioned it'd cost too much to re publish and no doubt you're still tied into some Draconian publishing contract. Maybe do a 2nd edition ready for Christmas Brian🎉

Thinking of which if anyone does have Brian's book going spare? Or maybe a lending fee for a month? Don't want to stump up £75 even though I'm sure it's worth every penny.

Cheers, Tony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
EssexBOF
2 hours ago, Tony said:

Unfortunately I never got to read your book, wish I had. No doubt as you've mentioned it'd cost too much to re publish and no doubt you're still tied into some Draconian publishing contract. Maybe do a 2nd edition ready for Christmas Brian🎉

Thinking of which if anyone does have Brian's book going spare? Or maybe a lending fee for a month? Don't want to stump up £75 even though I'm sure it's worth every penny.

Cheers, Tony

The cost for 50 copies works out at £1200, which would kill the £75 being charged now, but the market is limited .

I  have enough material to add another chapter for a second edition, but that involves another setup charge etc, so not likely.

See avatar for book cover.

Brian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jef Ott

Tony,

I do have a copy of Brian's book, which I would be happier lending than selling (as my family gets a mention within it).

Let me know when you have read the books you have.

Jef

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pete beadle
On 09/11/2019 at 18:50, Tony said:

. Anyways I'm stocking up on some Ovaltine and getting the Winter warmers out so I can sit down and have a good read when the Thermal Bible arrives or is that the Dave Hughes one that I also lost donkey's ago as well!

Hi all

I knew I had a spare copy of the Dave Hughes book "Radio Control Soaring" somewhere when Tony made this comment.

I remembered it's the one with the pic of Dave's "Elmira" floating serenely over the cooling towers of Didcot power station, in the inside flyleaf, and realised that two, important things were being commemorated there,   firstly the pleasure of flying 'til the light went, but also the iconic pic of flying over the columns of steam issuing from Didcot "B"'s cooling towers.....sadly, now demolished.....that was once THE main local landmark that was awakening my memory:yes:

Anyway, long story short, does anyone want this copy of Dave's excellent book? If so, please PM me, I'm thinking £10.00 for the book and £2.00 postage would be reasonable, what do you think? Please let me know ASAP, OK?.........  :) 

STOP PRESS! -  I've since found a copy of "Theory and Practice of Model Radio Control" 3rd edition with latest circuitry(!) by Paul Newell so I'll add that in FOC with the Dave Hughes book - always assuming the buyer wants it of course!:thumbsup:

Regards

Pete

BARCS1702

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
martynk

I bought a copy of Stringwell's Thermal Soaring (from a Charity Shop) about a year ago. Read it cover to cover - twice - then pondered about how wonderful it was flying Thermal Soarers back in the late 1980s, entries of upto 100 and flying with 'woodies' in all weather conditions. It was interesting that the the book also mentioned the first of the all moulded multi task gliders used by the Austrian Team. Was that the beginning of the end? Or the end of the beginning?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Graham Woods
20 minutes ago, martynk said:

> It was interesting that the the book also mentioned the first of the all moulded multi task gliders used by the Austrian Team. Was that the beginning of the end? Or the end of the beginning?

Good question Martyn...

David Woods,  Greg  Lewis and I were at the Oxford 1977 International F3B meet when we first encountered the Austrian Team.

There's a link on my page about 'the Austrians' to a B&W video shot by David on reel-to-reel tape.

http://favonius.com/soaring/speed/speed.htm

Graham Woods

Favonius.com

image.png.543eb594df27e2169f6fe440574c3ff5.png

 

 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pete beadle

Hi Martink

Quote -"Was that the beginning of the end? Or the end of the beginning?"

IMHO  It was neither, it was the inevitable march of progress, that's all........personally I believe the rosy glow of nostalgia is/was great, but not necessarily accurately remembered......

Regards

Pete

BARCS1702

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
martynk
26 minutes ago, pete beadle said:

Hi Martink

Quote -"Was that the beginning of the end? Or the end of the beginning?"

IMHO  It was neither, it was the inevitable march of progress, that's all........personally I believe the rosy glow of nostalgia is/was great, but not necessarily accurately remembered......

Regards

Pete

BARCS1702

I don't think it was nostalgia when it was written Pete, however, there may have been a certain amount of selling going on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
EssexBOF

I also was at this event.  The appearance of the Sitar models was a seed change & led to what was the decline in interest in F3b,which led to the rise in F3j in UK. Their models were very fast, being smaller and moulded( the first that I can remember seeing) and what stood out to me was that there was a rack of I think 6 of these models stood nose first in a rack. Being all identical, they would take any one to fly in a slot.

It should be remembered that the duration task then, was 6 minutes, which leads me to think they would have struggled to get to 10 .

Couple of pictures from my book, of the model I flew at the meet, called "Tristar" in view  of the type of event

image.png.28904fe029c4f5546aec702d54c416e6.png

 

image.png.edd8e9e11638d0f53f92e55d6f4f8a13.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Graham Woods
4 hours ago, EssexBOF said:

 Their models were very fast, being smaller and moulded( the first that I can remember seeing) and what stood out to me was that there was a rack of I think 6 of these models stood nose first in a rack. 

I remember that too from 42 years ago. The red and white 'uniforms' and their, let's say, professional approach was a surprise to us.

We never got a look at the models, they went back into the rack in the tent after each flight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pete beadle

Hi Graham

I remember speaking to Stu Blanchard at the 1983 World Champs round in York England when he said that his Calypso 7  model he was competing with there, was the last glass and foam model he'd be making. Less than a year later the rumours of a NEW,  all-moulded  design from him were proved true, and Stu unveiled the Model Technology name for his Calypso Contest model(s)

These models became the backbone of UK international F3B class soaring very quickly, and were acknowledged as the perfect "entry level" model(s) to the moulded scene developing rapidly over Europe.

For me, the Calypso Contest was the start of hi-tech model competition, and served its users well - over the years I've had five Calypso Contests, including the "Big-Un" at 3.5 metres and never regretted the purchase of each and every one of mine!......thanks Stu!:thumbsup:

Regards

Pete

BARCS1702

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jef Ott
7 hours ago, pete beadle said:

For me, the Calypso Contest was the start of hi-tech model competition, and served its users well - over the years I've had five Calypso Contests, including the "Big-Un" at 3.5 metres and never regretted the purchase of each and every one of mine!......thanks Stu!:thumbsup:

For the last eight years, my go-to model for all UK conditions on a slope, or off a winch.

Never had a walk of shame flying my Calypso Contests.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pete beadle

Hi Jef

4 or 5 years ago I was at Ivinghoe trying to sell my dear old Calypso Contest, that I'd bought several years before, and which was looking decidedly scruffy, to try to prove to the potential buyer that it was a bargain for what I was asking for it.......

The wind, although bang Westerly was dropping, and, every now and then, a real lump of genuine Ivinghoe sink drifted through and the PB was watching me like a hawk as the Calypso gradually dropped below the slope edge. I kept it tight against the ridge but just didn't have enough puff to keep me up. As it dropped remorselessly downwards I began to realise that I'd have to move away from the slope edge because, on the heading I was using, I was barely higher than the road below. Suddenly, I realised I was flying into a handkerchief-sized patch of lift.......I flung the Calypso into the tightest turn I could, said a silent prayer, and watched the Calypso climbing like a corkscrew

Mere seconds later, the Calypso popped up above the ridge, I made one more tight circle, the lift and the 'plane went different ways, and I landed, as if I'd intended to do it all the time, on the strip of grass on the shoulder of the hill........QED! the PB paid me a little stack of fivers when we reached our cars, both of us smiling like lunatics!

Best sale ever! Even though I've never been able to do it since!:) Oh, and yes, there were witnesses to this little marvel to prove it really DID happen!

Regards

Pete

BARCS1702

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jef Ott

Funnily enough, about a week ago, I rationalised what I should do when slope lift stops.

EVERY time I have failed to get back up the slope, it was because I was flying way too close to the slope, incorrectly thinking that was the safest place to be when the lift stopped.

If flying on a ridge (I am thinking Thurnham or Hadleigh Castle) one naturally traverses the ridge, moving the model away until a segment of the slope that is working is found, while checking all other accessible areas for positive lift indicators. 

It is when scratching and finding patches of light lift, below launch point and way upwind, in almost still conditions, and the safe return to launch point height that gives me the greatest satisfaction (being a thermal soarer at heart), so it is ironic that my natural reaction has sometimes been (when flying lesser models that possible don't overly inspire the confidence to venture further out) to "hug the slope".  When that does happen, there is only one likely outcome, a gradual descent of the slope with the inevitable walk of shame only being delayed and lengthened.

If the conditions are light at best, then you will probably be flying a model that will indicate and make good use of any light lift you contact anyway.  

Logically, I surmised, if loss of height means flying across wind along a ridge is no longer an option, then the next best thing to do is move (and keep moving) with moderate speed, upwind, until contact is made with lifting air.

So it is good, Pete, to read your very enjoyable account of doing exactly that.

Jef

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pete beadle

Hi all

I'm happy to report another "sale to a good home" occurred yesterday when I delivered my copy of Dave Hughes Radio Control Soaring book, in person, to an ISA member who lives almost within sight of the Beacon itself

The personal delivery had an unexpected bonus, when I was treated to a viewing  of the Grandfather clock the buyer had hand-built, to a properly professional standard, which was far more interesting than the usual "look round the models he had built" that others usually treat me to, and reminded me that it never ceases to amaze me just how some, if not all modelers have truly awesome, in the real sense of the word, skills that we  never get to hear about until we visit them in person.........a really worthwhile  day out yesterday and an obviously good home achieved:thumbsup:

Regards

Pete

BARCS1702  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.