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  1. Kyri

    Kyri

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      51


  2. pete beadle

    pete beadle

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      19

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      1,593


  3. Gromit

    Gromit

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      18

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  4. isoaritfirst

    isoaritfirst

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 16/12/18 in all areas

  1. 9 points
    Well it was always going to be a marginal call. We arrived to clag which if I'm honest didn't look like lifting however suddenly at 1130 we had flyable conditions. As we were expecting rain at 2pm and the fact there was only 7 of us we decided to fly crow through. We were half way through rounds 5&6 when the rain came. Not a classic comp but based on the last couple of years I'll take 4 rounds over none Joel Wales Winter League-2018-2.xls
  2. 6 points
    My early morning drive for a New years day on the Whitesheet slopes proved to be full of unexpected surprises today.. 1. Just a couple of miles from home I had a nice view of a Fox wandering along the road before jumping up the roadside bank & disappearing into a hedgerow, nice 2. 10 minutes later whilst doing 70 mph on the M3 nr Basingstoke, I was hard on the brakes as a large Tawney Owl suddenly appeared in a tumble of feathers as he managed to veer up & over my car roof just inches from coming through my car windscreen, Phew ! 3. 40 minutes later around 1/2 mile from Stonehenge I was hard on the brakes again as a fox bolted across the road 4. 10 minutes further whilst doing 65mph a Roe deer was stood on the very edge of the dual carriageway, happily grazing away without a 2nd thought to being lit up in the full beam of my headlights 5. Just a few hundred yards further & a what looked like some debris in the road turned out to be a Little Owl standing between two sets of Cats eyes in the centre of the road, On slowing down he just stayed there & watched me pass 6. On reaching the A303 services just before Mere, I pulled in for a coffee & to gather a few supplies for my day on the slope. My morning of surprises then got even weirder as none other than Celebrity Chef Gordon Ramsay walked in & bought a coffee too , nice bloke . As for todays flying , cracking Bewildered Stu .
  3. 6 points
  4. 5 points
    What about that release is fact free? Do you know of some facts that were omitted? It reflects the exact state of play with regards to the level of trust there was, and shows that it has been broken and eroded by the person or people using drones illegally and against the current and future regulations. It highlights that the CAA/Police til now have not taken seriously the threat to commercial airspace and will now accelerate their countermeasures (which we can assume will no longer be gentle) of drones (UAV's) in restricted airspace. The police need to try their best to find the person/people involved and throw the entire book at them. (I'd start looking at disgruntled ex-employees and go from there). If I find any footage from the drones on the internet, I'll be forwarding it to the police, and sharing it on social media in an attempt to get the perpetrator/s apprehended. On the suggestion of a government enquiry, haven't we learned in the last 2 and a bit years that any government input is useless? Why on earth would you want them to step in to Drone regulation or even an investigation???. Surely industry led is far better than some pocket lining, dipstick politician? How many people who made decisions regarding flammable cladding on highrise accommodation have been held responsible, accountable, culpable by the government enquiry?
  5. 5 points
    Yup, thanks again Joel for the organisation! Thanks to those that travelled a distance to make it possible to have the comp. We did well to get the 4 rounds in inbetween the clag and the rain. Another learning experience. I now understand crow-through and just how bad I am at recovering from a cut. I'm looking forward to spending some of the week ahead on holiday practising (no doubt inbetween showers and clag). Looking forward to seeing you and others at woolly backs. Fingers crossed for some great conditions!
  6. 4 points
    During last years (2018) Welsh Open F3f competition, Kevin Newton live streamed a significant amount of the event onto facebook. Fortunately for me Kevin captured my day 1 round 2 flight, this was to be the fastest time of the 3 full days of racing, this being 38.17 . Kevin has very kindly allowed me post this footage here on BARCS. Slope is the 'Crest' at The Bwlch, South Wales. Thank you Kevin, so very much appreciated . Receiving my trophy for the fastest time, from competition organiser Kevin Newton. Photo by Danniel Schneider. Stu.
  7. 4 points
    Hi Jon Following our conversation yesterday I have analysed your launch, and had a little time to put some words together. What I can see is very much the same as most people starting out and not too dissimilar to what we see at the F3K come try it days, so I hope that you are not the only one to take advantage from this advice. I agree 100% with Richard, it seems that you have now gained such technique that you might be at the top end of the models capabilities, the Blaster is a big DLG which has both a very high drag coefficient and soft composite structure. A change to a more modern airframe will see a noticeable improvement before any change to technique. I love the science and detail in our sport, I am currently studying Physiology and Sports Phycology and I am in the process of writing a white paper about their attribution and effect in F3K. In a very short summary the ideal launch is generated by a combination of speed and strength, speed is the main ingredient and is generated by 'LAG' which is the angular differential between the key component body parts; mainly the relationship between the feet placement, shoulders and hips and the throwing arm and shoulders. Think about when you throw a ball! It is not a rigid movement, what I mean is that it is fluid, the throwing arm moves independent of the feet, hips and shoulders. The foot is planted followed by the hips rotating towards the target line, followed then by the shoulders and again by the throwing arm, this is one fluid smooth movement. Notice the 'LAG' between them or the delay in which they move, the foot or 'power step' is planted, the hips then rotate towards the target line followed by the shoulders and then the arm before releasing the ball, this is the same movement as you would use to skim a stone across the water...….! Sounds simple right? Okay then put a DLG model in the throwing hand instead of a ball or stone, the body then reacts differently as brain now comes into play and you know that the object you are holding is now something of value. All kinds of negative thoughts now race through your mind, you think about striking the wingtip on the ground, is the throwing blade going to come loose, am I happy with the structural integrity of the airframe, are the launch settings correct, are the servos and linkages sound, does the battery have enough voltage etc. Now what happens is the muscles tense and you are not living in the present moment, not thinking about the position of the throwing arm before starting the rotation, not thinking about the lag or coil, not thinking about the feet position etc, etc. Now try throwing a ball feeling tense and uptight, the muscles are restricted in movement and the throw will be one rigid movement with little to no lag or differential between moving body parts, 100% guaranteed you will not throw the ball anywhere near as far as before. Golf is a great example, the harder you try and hit a golf ball the more tense your body and the worse the outcome. The golf swing is all about clubhead speed which is generated by ‘LAG’, the hips are turned towards the target almost 90 degrees before the arms come through and the impact of the ball takes place. Think of winding up a spring and then letting it go. We are all different shapes and sizes with differing athletic ability and age, the biggest key to a good launch is to be relaxed, focused and committed. I have attached a brief document which should try and help explain, picture paints a thousand words and all that! Good luck. Jon Launch.pdf
  8. 4 points
    Here is another one for you - https://www.altitudeangel.com/blog/gatwick-airport-disruption-due-to-reported-drone-sightings/ A club mate was advised by the police not to put his address on models as it tells somebody who finds it where they can find more. I generally put a mobile phone number on mine. Steve
  9. 3 points
    Tranava air field site where the WC is being held is very different to Martin where Peter mentions The site is a very very long flattish grass runway ,with hangar buildings and concrete to one side ,open fields to the other . No mountains that I can remember close by . But yes it can be windy and we had mini hurricane pass through on our last trip From last year's experience in Bulgaria I,d say you have got to have a model capable on launch to fly up wind as far as your eyesight allows Carrying full ballast and with a liipo that will survive being cooked during a 30second full power run against a max wind speed. Then if you find lift your model will have to be capable off returning from the down wind leg ,which will be further that your eye sight Allows as the best pilots will have walked following there models down wind . Difficult to explain here ,but EC and WC flying is a whole different ball game. Benny Fiegl reported using a 6s lipo in one off his Pikes ???
  10. 3 points
    £50 might get you permission Funny how everything nowadays seems to revolve around taxes or fines instead of getting to the root of the issue...
  11. 3 points
    Could be tricky Nick as there are so many variables. My line of work is performance testing, one of the keys is repeatable conditions, airspeed, temperature etc. I am often lucky enough to practice with a very wily pilot, if he is staying up and I'm not then I'm doing something wrong! There are so many variables in F5J, launch height being one of them. Missing from the competition environment is the chance of being bailed out by other gliders circling. What I do is identify a weak area or fault and work on it (launching too high/too low, missing weak lift, not following thermals downwind enough, landing too early or late and missing the '50 point' zone of the tape. In truth I probably don't have one weak area but have to work on all these things together. Helmut Reichmann was a World Champion glider pilot, he wrote a very good book about cross-country soaring, he suggests some exercises including thermalling in different directions (left or right turns because we often have a preferred direction) and one that I use a lot with models is to leave a strong thermal at a good height, descend to just above circuit height and then try to find the thermal again. I practise landing with a circular ring Frisbee or a sun hat as a marker. I've used a talking timer for a long time but found it clumsy to use, I now have a 10 min 30 sec audio timer set up in my transmitter, it is the GliderScore timer with extra five second intervals between one minute and 30 seconds left. The extra 30 seconds is a countdown to the slot start. You can closely analyse height limiter traces and in dead air they can show fairly accurate minimum sink descent rates. I had one glider very obviously unstable in pitch when thermalling, every thermal was shown as a sine wave on the trace, half the circle it was going up the other half it was going down! Spent some time on the setup and it is much better now. What you could do with Excel is plot your overall score percentage that is given on every score sheet, I have been thinking of doing that just for fun and to prove to myself that I am improving even if it only 0.5% every comp! Cheers Gary
  12. 3 points
  13. 3 points
    I’ve gone nowhere, done nothing and that’s what I intend to do for the rest of the day. Merry Christmas to all!
  14. 3 points
    Hi all Sorry, but I couldn't resist it!....... Unwilling to go to my brother and sister-in-law's for Xmas Day dinner because of the dreadful weather forecast threatening fog and even freezing fog, and equally unable to join the Woods brothers at Ivinghoe for the same reason, I decided I'd visit my local field/Open Space instead I rocked up there at 12.30 GMT to find the conditions eminently flyable, so I assembled the Radian E, climbed the little hill and began to commit model flying without a breath of wind and about 8 degrees C. What ensued was a delightful Xmas present to myself, as I milked the wasted heat from the central heating systems of the BIG houses surrounding the field and enjoyed nearly two hours of tippytoes flying, flattening two 1300mAh LiPos in the process, and neatly avoided all the Xmas film repeats on the box......hopefully doing what you chaps couldn't ,because of family commitments and such. So, along with my best wishes to all for a Merry Christmas and a prosperous New Year to you all, I thought I'd send you the proof of my Merry Christmas getting under way in the best possible way and wish you the same - or better Regards Pete BARCS1702
  15. 3 points
    i actually took half a day off work to go to one of the consultation workshops that was being run by the company contracted by the governemt to impliment drone registration/legislation. It was actually a very constructive meeting, with reprisentitives from military suppliers, large-scale commercial operators and hobbists. I felt that all the points that I wanted to raise were listened to and taken into consideration. It felt to me like no-one from the traditional RC hobby had spoken to them up to that point, or if they had, they had not put their point across effectively. Essentially I was trying to convey the message that a lot of the assumtions being made in their legislation simply is not applicable to how we operate. The best analogy was that it was like trying to apply the same laws and regulation around commercial heavy goods vehicles, to a bicycle. I dont know if anyone else from our side of the hobby went? Regardless, I would not be suprised that after gatwick, there will be moves to apply a blanket ban on all RC aircraft sales, while they figure out what to do.
  16. 3 points
    So looks like we have 12 likely warriors for this , I have the key if were on Mickeys . Will make the weather call on the Friday evening so fingers crossed and if we can meet at 9:30 on the Saturday morning either at the T junction or the wrecker car park which ever is more likely . Andy.
  17. 3 points
    I tried a real trees line yesterday afternoon, it's much better :
  18. 3 points
    Who said "little" iDS system is not secure
  19. 2 points
    My father set light to his living room table with a 100mm map magnifier left uncovered.... good job he was home when the sun came out. Mother was not impressed.
  20. 2 points
    The "Tiny" Church you are referring too, Pete, lives in Tiptree, Essex and his son is Gary Church. Sadly, neither of them fly much now, Tiny though incapacity and Gary is into motorbikes again. A good model to fly IMHO is the 2 Metre Q12. It only weighs in at just over 550 grams RTF. Penetrates suprisingl well and can be landed most times with no damage as it is so light. They do a larger version now called "Geronimo", but have not seen one to know how they perform. This is probably because they fall in between 2 and 4 metre classes.
  21. 2 points
    Unfortunately in the UK we have some good pilots but not great ones . in Europe a timekeeper / spotter would often be referred to as a coach . Anyone who saw young Julian Benz flying in the UK last year could see he had been Coached to a high standard . His model set up was far superior to most off ours . For me to improve I would need to be coached by someone who could recognise my mistakes and help me to correct them. I suspect it’s not an excel sheet you need . But a Joe Wurts or Thomas Rößner (shouting in your ear )
  22. 2 points
    You’re in a similar place I was last year. The basic launch technique looks good. Just keep you arm up a little. I didn’t, and when I tried adding power I had a tip strike on a 1.5m. Luckily it lived to fly again Fly as much as you can, doing lots of launches eventually you will feel muscles aching a little in your core. The strength will build slowly. I have a countdown timer set for 1:30, so after I launch I practice on-time on target (catch or land at your feet) landing and launch again quickly. If the weather is good I make this a longer countdown. Fly in wind as well to practice approaches in the wind. I can get normally 45+m with my best at 52m. Aiming to improve more this year plus more competitions. Look at this clip at 40secs not much running but a very good launch Paul
  23. 2 points
    Christmas Message from the President It was the outgoing President Sydney Lenssen who broached the proposition to me, to take on the post of President, although I think it will be difficult to fill his shoes especially in regards to his reports over the years, in the many aspects of our hobby. I think I speak for all of us, when I say that his reports on the F3J and FAI aspects of thermal soaring, under the’ Uncle Sydney’ columns, have always been interesting and informative. Although not being a member of BARCS when it was formed in 1972, I believe, having joined in 1974, I knew most of the early cadre of flyers who initiated its formation. There was a move to establish a group of like-minded flyers, to promote RC gliding in all forms, as it was felt that the SMAE did not provide a section that supported their interests at that time. It was to prove successful in as much that the SMAE, adopted the majority of the competition classes and rules into their rule book. It is an established fact, that numbers engaged in model flying of all persuasions, are falling. The age of model flyers is in the retired group mainly nowadays, so numbers flying are dwindling, due to mortality as well as loss of interest and moving on to bigger things. Only today I heard that one of the younger flyers I taught some years ago, Peter Barnes is now Vice President of Airbus America. Sydney Lenssen did compile a detailed analysis of how this is happening across Europe, in the various RC glider classes. Although some flyers do move over to electric launched classes, even they are just about maintaining numbers. The committee, is aiming to achieve closer liaisons with the BMFA, with the growth of electric gliding, bringing the classes flown by the two groups, very close together in the rules used, making this a possibility. On a final note, the weather this year has been exceptional for the summer months, rivalling 1976. It was strange that some contests, were still lost when the weather, turned sour on the days allocated to them. Let us hope that 2019, will be even half as good as 2018 was. I would like to take this initial piece, to wish all BARCS members a very Happy Christmas and New Year, on behalf of the committee and myself Brian Austin, BARCS President Chairman’s Christmas message Wise words from Brian. The first half of 2018 was a worrying time for all model flyers (especially the soaring glider community) as the proposed 400 foot height limit hung over us like a dark cloud. What was not widely known was that BMFA staff were working very hard behind the scenes to convince the CAA and EASA that the blanket limit was unrealistic and unnecessary. An exemption was granted for model aircraft and an amendment made to the Air Navigation Order. During a BARCS committee visit to Chacksfield House it was explained how the exemption was granted and that work in this area of regulation has been ongoing for many years and continues. The second purpose of the visit was to discuss closer ties between BARCS and the Silent Flight Technical Committee as Brian touched on in his message. March 2019 may (or may not!) bring the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union, what effect this will have on moulded model prices is unclear at the moment. Hopefully it will have no effect at all on the ease of crossing the Channel either way, Interglide (F5J) was particularly popular with French pilots this year, they used the event as their team selection competition. Improvements at the National Flying Centre (NFC) continue, mostly to the camping area and domestic facilities, Radioglide 2019 is planned to be held at the centre again, the third time the event (and AGM) will be held there, how time flies! I wish you all the best for 2019 whether you will be standing on a cliff in a howling gale, on a hill in a gentle zephyr or sharing a farmer’s field with 200 sheep as I do! Cheers, Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Gary Binnie, BARCS Chairman
  24. 2 points
    Sorted . Sam has been offered a very good deal on a complete Willow airframe (minus gear). this couldn't be more perfect. Our thanks to this BARCS member. Many thanks from both Sam & I to all those of you who have Pm'd me with suggestions & offers of help, these are all very much appreciated . Stu & Sam.
  25. 2 points
    Best to avoid putting cranks in pushrods. On small model like this I often use simple L bends. At the servo end use the smallest arm possible or drill a hole in an arm. Try got around 5-6mm radius. Once all is installed glue a soft balsa Rib into the wing, as a keeper to hold the pushrod in place. If you ever need to remove, simply break the keeper rib out. Be very accurate in creating good square L bend. Anything less than perfect will weR the hole, and also may work its way out of position. Having a crank as in the picture makes it much harder to achieve a good accurate install( and shouldn’t be needed)
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