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Found 49 results

  1. WITH RELUCTANCE AND SADNESS With great regret, the BARCS Committee has to announce that they will not be organising any F3J league competitions this year and are unlikely to start again until further interest in participation emerges. This means that F3J will not be held at RadioGlide, the BMFA Nationals and other venues which had been announced on the Forum. Some contests to be run at RadioGlide and the Nationals will be rescheduled and provide alternative opportunities to compete. Your committee circulated a question to some 40 pilots who fly F3J: “Do you intend to enter any F3J competitions this year?” Replies were received from 19 pilots within 24 hours. Seven members replied positively: Yes. Another replied: Perhaps. Others said: No. Your committee had stated in the questionnaire that it believed that a minimum of 12 pilots was required to run contests which form the basis of awarding UK team places for the World Championships next year 2018. Some positive replies noted that they believed that at least 16 pilots was a minimum, probably more realistic. No F3J pilot who has competed over recent years would want to see this form of competition shrivelling and dying a slow death, especially in the country which provided the original thinking to and established F3J as a recognised FAI activity. Hence the decision to stop. Sorry. View full news and information
  2. WITH RELUCTANCE AND SADNESS With great regret, the BARCS Committee has to announce that they will not be organising any F3J league competitions this year and are unlikely to start again until further interest in participation emerges. This means that F3J will not be held at RadioGlide, the BMFA Nationals and other venues which had been announced on the Forum. Some contests to be run at RadioGlide and the Nationals will be rescheduled and provide alternative opportunities to compete. Your committee circulated a question to some 40 pilots who fly F3J: “Do you intend to enter any F3J competitions this year?” Replies were received from 19 pilots within 24 hours. Seven members replied positively: Yes. Another replied: Perhaps. Others said: No. Your committee had stated in the questionnaire that it believed that a minimum of 12 pilots was required to run contests which form the basis of awarding UK team places for the World Championships next year 2018. Some positive replies noted that they believed that at least 16 pilots was a minimum, probably more realistic. No F3J pilot who has competed over recent years would want to see this form of competition shrivelling and dying a slow death, especially in the country which provided the original thinking to and established F3J as a recognised FAI activity. Hence the decision to stop. Sorry.
  3. Hey everyone! A question most likely for F3x competitors, what type of boxes do you use to get your models on a plane, or what have you seen in use? I've been trying to find something big enough to take a few F3K size planes, but not dramatically expensive neither. I looked at the type of transport box Hyperflight is selling, though it doesn't fill me with confidence as to the strength of one (selling a damaged box at half price now). I thought of adapting one of the Ski plastic boxes that can accommodate up to 4/5 sets of skis, but getting one big enough in UK, not to mention the price, is giving me a headache. I'm not desperate for one yet, but by next year I will. Thanks for help in advance Eryk
  4. Good luck to Kevin Beale, Mark DeVall, Neil Jones and the rest of the British Team, travelling to Slovenia for this years World Championships. Full details and results can be found here
  5. Once again it is my pleasure to collate a report for this year’s Radioglide event. Held at the now familiar Tudor Farm near the village of Edgcott in Buckinghamshire, the winch launch competitions were held in a new field adjacent to the previously used one as this has been ploughed and planted with crop. The weather stayed dry for all three days, a touch windy at times (some might say more than a touch!) and a great time was had by all. Please find the individual discipline reports below, I hope there are no glaring errors but it is difficult sometimes as a competing pilot to take in all that is going on. Saturday 28th May F5J – Gary Binnie Colin Boorman. Radioglide F5J winner 2016 The day dawned fine with a hazy blue sky initially, cumulus developed in the early afternoon with a North Easterly wind up to 12 mph but it was quite calm at times, probably due to thermal influence. It was fairly chilly in the morning requiring light jackets to be worn but warmed up to 19°C later. The air in early rounds featured weak lift with the best pilots making the most of it and flying the slots out. Pilots flew together in groups of four or five with seven rounds flown with a dropped score applied. Timing and spotting in F5J is a responsible job and you can often be paired up with a pilot that you’ve never worked with before. A lighter moment for me was during a launch with Al Lipscombe, he became unbalanced somehow and launched the model awkwardly and in a downward direction instead of nose up. I heard a faint click which was his right hand coming down to the transmitter to accidentally turn the motor switch off with the model now climbing! The model landed about 50 metres upwind and we walked over to record the flight, time was 11.8 seconds (I couldn’t bring myself to round it up to 12!) with a launch height of six metres. We handed the score card in which bagged him a mighty 13 points, this was handily voided with the drop score applied and we all had a chuckle. Peter Allen launches his Tragi with Ian Duff on the watches (Photo Graham James) Everybody has their own preference for motor switch position, my own method is to use a latching switch on the left back of the transmitter which operates towards me during motor run with my finger holding it in the on position just in case. A useful break was taken every couple of rounds to enter the scores with a longer lunch break. The local red kites showed the way as usual, I joined a circling seagull once, I don’t usually trust them but it was going up! Final positions were Colin Boorman winning, Dave East as runner-up with Graham Wicks in third place. F5J Results Rank Name Score Pcnt Raw Score Rnd1 Rnd2 Rnd3 Rnd4 Rnd5 Rnd6 Rnd7 Drop1 1 BOORMAN, Colin 5904.4 100 6676.7 959.2 1000 975.8 992.2 1000 977.2 772.3 772.3 2 EAST, Dave 5874 99.49 6409.8 995.7 960.7 1000 935.8 535.8 1000 981.8 535.8 3 WICKS, Graham 5844.5 98.99 6757.5 940.1 1000 956.9 990.4 971.9 985.2 913 913 4 DUFF, Ian 5827.6 98.7 6196.9 961.6 913.6 369.3 1000 1000 1000 952.4 369.3 5 ALLEN, Peter 5774.5 97.8 6283.2 508.7 994.6 1000 906.6 1000 873.3 1000 508.7 6 RAYBONE, Mike 5343.1 90.49 5690.8 1000 996.4 621.6 921.2 347.7 803.9 1000 347.7 7 AUSTIN, Brian 5139.7 87.05 5448.9 1000 309.2 1000 959.1 521.2 739.1 920.3 309.2 8 BEALE, Kevin 5104.7 86.46 5118.9 423.3 999.1 747.2 1000 935.9 999.2 14.2 14.2 9 PADDON, Colin 5076.2 85.97 5502.9 426.7 954.6 601.8 1000 891.1 976.5 652.2 426.7 10 GADENE, Ray 5054.9 85.61 5496.9 442 966 632.9 967.8 627.9 1000 860.3 442 11 BINNIE, Gary 4983.1 84.4 5345.4 530.6 949.5 918.3 741.3 922.9 362.3 920.5 362.3 12 DICKENSON, Bob 4973.3 84.23 4973.3 1000 1000 498.5 998.3 0.0001 476.5 1000 0 13 LIPSCOMBE, Al 4059.4 68.75 4073.3 13.9 372.6 690.8 736 945.2 906.3 408.5 13.9 14 PHILCOX, Cengiz 4007.2 67.87 4007.2 830.2 0.0001 530.5 886.3 970.9 789.3 0 0 100S – Graham James Kevin & Peter Newitt. Radioglide 100s Joint winners 2016 (Photo Alan Morton) The 100s competition was flown concurrently with the F5J in the adjacent field, Alan Morton was invited to CD. We had 13 entries in pre-allocated teams, on the day only 12 turned up so Alan juggled them around to give us four teams of three and flying started around 10.40am. Five rounds and two fly-offs were matrixed. The warm air and gentle breeze created some good workable lift throughout the day and all but one of the 15 slots flown during the first five rounds were flown out. Up until round three all models apart from one out of field had landed inside the landing zone, during the 3rd round. John Hullet misjudged and landed out and Neville Warby making his final turn, was grabbed by an innocent looking tree! It was later recovered by the farmer’s cherry picker with no damage. During the rest of the first five rounds we had excellent flight times including one from Dave Leech at 7.54 he came off the line early but still managed to fly out the slot. After a very enjoyable five rounds the top four pilots entered the fly-off, Kevin Newitt, Fozzy Devall, Peter Newitt and Graham James. Nesting Tracker (Photo Graham James) All pilots launched and were soon into decent air; Graham lost out and had to settle for 6.45 while the others continued to fly the slot out. Following a misunderstanding in the second fly off, in which a model was relaunched when it shouldn’t, there was an unfortunate mid-air which resulted in Peter Newitt having to land prematurely. It was apparent that but for this he was likely to have taken a clean win of the event, so in the spirit of good sportsmanship it was decided to award Peter and Kevin Newitt joint winners. The day ended with everyone in high spirits after what was an excellent day's flying, it was good to see pilots still enjoying a good old fashioned 100s competition. Results Rounds Pilot Name Rnd 1 Rnd 2 Rnd 3 Rnd 4 Rnd 5 Final Score %Score Position Kevin Newitt 1000 1000 1000 1000 998 4998 100.00 1 Fozzy DeVall 1000 996 1000 1000 1000 4996 99.96 2 13. Peter Newitt 1000 1000 861 1000 1000 4861 97.26 3 Graham James 970 967 955 976 988 4856 97.16 4 8. Alan Morton 1000 1000 628 1000 1000 4628 92.60 5 David Leech 647 696 984 961 1000 4288 85.79 6 Robin Sleight 467 850 1000 704 988 4009 80.21 7 Neville Warby 998 752 0 988 1000 3738 74.79 8 Ken Goddard 776 998 996 478 435 3683 73.69 9 John Hullet 994 688 512 515 900 3609 72.21 10 John Shenstone 915 996 675 0 0 2586 51.74 11 Dave Fogg 0 657 0 0 0 657 13.15 12 Final Positions 1st 13. Peter Newitt 1997 100.0 1st 11. Kevin Newitt 1997 100.0 3rd 4. Fozzy DeVall 1652 82.7 4th 5. Graham James 1057 52.9 Thanks to Alan for running the competition and all the regular 100s pilots who assist in laying out the field and in particular the inimitable Neville Warby. Sunday 29th May Multi-launch – Graham James Multilaunch Fly-Off Pilots (Photo Graham James) Sunday’s weather was a bit of a disappointment by comparison, overcast with a chilly North Easterly breeze turning to broken cumulus later in the afternoon. Five preliminary rounds were flown plus two fly-off rounds. There was a fairly even split of winch and electric launch gliders and one DLG flown by Mike Fantham. The ‘sailboat start’ meaning that all flights are timed from the start of the slot (or end of the individuals launch phase) and electrics set to 175 metres leads to a very level playing field and some long flight times the best of which being a 9.59 by Al Lipscombe. This parity was further borne out in that the four pilots in the fly-off used a 50/50 mix of winch launch and electric gliders. Good air in the first fly off slot saw flight times of 14.53 for Peter Allen (Electric) and 14.46 for Kevin Beale (Winch). In the second round, with the lift not so good Peter and different winch launcher, Colin Boorman produced times of 11.25 and 11.07 respectively. But in the end it was Peter Allen (Electric) who proved triumphant followed by Kevin Beale (Winch), Colin Boorman (Winch) and Colin Paddon (Electric). As well as the presentation of the FACCT Trophy to the overall winner, prizes were given for Best Winch, Electric and Hand Launch competitors. We were delighted to be visited by the legendary Geoff Dallimer, BARCS No. 1, who showed a keen interest in the model development over the years since his days of designing models such as the Zephyr 100s design featured in RCM&E. Multi-launch Fly-Off Results Rank Name Score Pcnt Raw Score Rnd1 Rnd2 1 ALLEN, Peter 1964.4 100 1964.4 964.4 1000 2 BEALE, Kevin 1934.7 98.49 1934.7 1000 934.7 3 BOORMAN, Colin 1728.2 87.98 1728.2 752.7 975.5 4 PADDON, Colin 1544.3 78.61 1544.3 606.9 937.4 DLG Pilot's Perspective of Multi-launch – Mike Fantham I entered Multi-launch partly out of curiosity and partly because I had helped Jef Ott to prepare a rule change proposal aimed at getting more hand launch pilots out to ML events - so I thought I'd better try one! The first thing I noticed was that I was quickest into the air on arrival at the field. The model was fully assembled in the car when I arrived and I just had to step out onto the field and throw. That was to be the only advantage I had because the weather seemed a bit breezy for hand launch to be the best option for me to win the event. Chas Dunster kindly volunteered to time for me and he wasn't flying himself so I had a dedicated helper. I soon got into the swing of things except the 'finding good air' part. The hand launch flyer gets four flights added together to make up the slot score and a two second bonus for each re-launch. I hoped to 'get away' on one of these and fly out the slot each time. However, from a 35 metre launch in the breezy conditions, I only really got any help on a couple of flights all day, making about four minutes each time. It was a bit galling seeing the others making 200 metres and having plenty of range and time to find air. In the end, I was pleased to see that I was 12th out of the 14 at the end of the day and I took home a bottle of wine as the best (only!) Hand launch entrant. I need to practice my spot landings. I can easily catch the model on most flights normally but I can also easily change my position to meet the model! When you have to stand still and land at your feet, it gets much harder! The best part was meeting and flying with some of the 'names' from the 'big glider world' - nice bunch of chaps and I was made welcome and to really feel part of the event. The top Hand launch pilots, launching almost twice as high as I can would be competitive in this class. I was 7th of the 8 the next day in Hand launch.... Come and try F3K flyers. Monday 30th May F3K – Mike Fantham We had a low entry of eight - one original entrant had to drop out because a long struggle to finish his model had not worked out. He still came out to help and time on the Monday which was very welcome! We were pleased to see Liam Hawes out again and to welcome Jason Bioletti at his first F3K event - he retired early but said had a good time and that he'd be back. The forecast had been dire all the previous week and I had posted a warning of cancellation the BARCS forum on the Saturday promising a decision by midday Sunday. On Sunday morning, I was busy with the MLG contest but checking the weather as well. Rain looked unlikely and the wind was high but below the limit so I decided to go ahead with F3K - we had the minimum eight required for a league-counting event and would need four rounds for the score to count. Monday morning saw me on the field at 08:45 choosing a site for the launch and landing 'box'. It was fairly near the chicken farm edge of the field to try to keep the F3J field downwind, ensuring a 'friendly' area for any land-outs. In the event nobody dared stray that far downwind. The wind was strong but it was flyable and I could range upwind on my test flights - helped by 84 grams of ballast in my already-heavy 'Bonus' – a 400 gm total weight! I had some problems with the sound gear but we got going soon after 10:00 with an initial aim of completing four rounds. Pilots soon found that there was 'help' over the edge of the field - possibly slope lift from the trees/hedge. Michael Stern only dropped 20 seconds in the 5x2 in round 1. He would hope to drop around five seconds in perfect weather so it was an excellent score in the rough conditions. There was turbulence of course but we coped and I wasn't aware of too much in the way of damage. After three successful rounds, I had decided to go to five rounds before lunch and before I did any scoring because a fifth round means that there's one dropped round score available to pilots. The usual suspects were building a lead and Richard Swindells was ahead at lunch with Michael Stern second and Simon Barker third. Conditions still seemed pretty much the same so we decided to press on after lunch and see what happened. I started the sixth round and it soon became apparent that conditions had become more turbulent and the wind had increased. I saw some flights upset badly and only some fast –reaction piloting got them safely back on the ground - usually 'in the box'. After slot two of that round, I called it a day. Nobody complained! As to models, the top four all used a Stream NXT for at least some of their flights. The trend continues to solid core moulded wings and lighter models with lower wing areas. Full slot-by-slot results are available in the F3K and Hand launch section of the BARCS forum. 1. Richards Swindells 4994 2. Michael Stern 4905 3. Simon Barker 4599 4. Liam Hawes 4347 5. Alex Holswilder 4330 6. Lorry Green 3142 7. Mike Fantham 2661 8. Jason Bioletti 1404 F3J – Gary Binnie/Graham James Neil Jones. Radioglide F3J winner 2016 More overcast still than the first couple of days and a stronger NNE wind requiring thicker jackets than Saturday (motorcycle jacket for me!). The forecast was to be dry all day which it was but moisture could be felt in the air but not seen. With the strong wind most pilots used the technique of hanging into wind and ‘bouncing’ any lift with the occasional circle. Conditions improved and more and more people were venturing further afield. I noticed from the lunch break scores that I was doing quite well and decided to ‘go for it’ in the next round by circling off merrily down wind, unfortunately my plan failed with my trusty Xplorer not quite making it back to the field against the headwind, c’est la vie! Landing itself quite neatly in the next field I have at last broken my duck of landing ‘au vache’ and plan to risk it more in future. Kevin Beale with Spotter Colin Boormann The familiar Xplorers, Maxas and Tragi's dominated the models used but Pike Perfects, Shadows and Xperience Pros were also in evidence and still very competitive. Also on show were a couple of the new Optimus machines which look very good and are likely to prove popular in the future. Five rounds were flown followed by two fly-off rounds, all under the familiar, watchful eye of BARCS President, Sydney Lenssen. The preliminary rounds saw the top four pilots going onto the fly offs. Appropriately, Neil Jones with a maximum 5000, Kevin Beale and Mark Devall, who comprise the UK Team for the forthcoming World Championships, all made it through along with Colin Paddon who is a helper on the team. Neil didn’t have it all his own way, with Kevin winning the first slot but by only 6.3pts. In fly-off two however, the roles were reversed and Neil came out on top overall. And so to prize giving. Neil Jones took the Humbrol Trophy for F3J. Additional Radioglide prizes also went to Colin Boorman for the highest place competitor over the whole three Days (Victor Ludorum) and to Jason Bioletti as the Best Newcomer (Lillienthal Trophy). F3J Fly-Off Results Rank Name Score Pcnt Raw Score Rnd1 Rnd2 1 JONES, Neil 1993.7 100 1993.7 993.7 1000 2 BEALE, Kevin 1786.9 89.63 1786.9 1000 786.9 3 PADDON, Colin 1522.4 76.36 1522.4 848 674.4 4 DEVALL, Mark 1515.7 76.02 1515.7 979.5 536.2 Rounds Rank Name Score Pcnt Raw Score Rnd1 Rnd2 Rnd3 Rnd4 Rnd5 1 JONES, Neil 5000 100 5000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 2 BEALE, Kevin 4457.1 89.14 4457.1 1000 782.6 1000 674.5 1000 3 DEVALL, Mark 4432.6 88.65 4432.6 780.3 1000 975.2 1000 677.1 4 PADDON, Colin 4415.2 88.3 4415.2 968.5 498.6 948.1 1000 1000 5 PHILCOX, Cengiz 4411.2 88.22 4411.2 991.2 798.9 905 1000 716.1 6 DUFF, Ian 4260.1 85.2 4260.1 1000 688.7 717.5 862.2 991.7 7 OSBOURNE, Ozzie 4168 83.36 4168 864.8 821.5 892.4 796.3 793 8 DICKENSON, Bob 4034.5 80.69 4034.5 850.5 690.4 652.4 993.2 848 9 BOORMAN, Colin 3961.1 79.22 3961.1 942.4 810.1 582.6 822.6 803.4 10 BINNIE, Gary 3719.9 74.4 3719.9 785.1 1000 934.8 0 1000 11 JAMES, Graham 3560.3 71.21 3560.3 888.2 657.2 694 920.7 400.2 12 SHENSTONE, John 3542.9 70.86 3542.9 730.5 972.7 511.9 489.4 838.4 13 DUNSTER, Chas 3517.1 70.34 3517.1 483.7 1000 694.1 788.2 551.1 14 EAST, Dave 3305.3 66.11 3305.3 1000 938.5 632 0 734.8 15 ALLEN, Peter 2990.9 59.82 2990.9 998.5 992.4 1000 0 0 16 RAYBONE, Mike 2676.1 53.52 2676.1 861.8 814.3 1000 0 0 17 LIPSCOMBE, Al 2449.4 48.99 2449.4 666.1 643.2 0 692.8 447.3 18 SLEIGHT, Robin 661.7 13.23 661.7 661.7 0 0 0 0 "Uncle" Sydney Lenssen Congratulations to all Winners in the four events over the weekend. We hope everyone enjoyed themselves. Many thanks go to all the CD’s for running the event and to the organisational team behind the whole weekend. Long may Radioglide continue.
  6. Without a suitable field being available to hold an event with all SF classes being represented in one place, this year the SF Nats competitions will be held at various locations. 4 classes will be hosted at Wetlands over August Bank Holiday weekend 27th - 29th August Saturday – F5J; Sunday – F3J & 2M eSoaring; Monday – Open eSoaring Camping on site will be available. (Note - dogs are not allowed at Wetlands) Entry to these events and camping reservation, will be by website topics (BARCS & eSoaring), from mid July, with payment being made at the first competition attended. 100S will be held at Twywell on Sept 4th – look for website announcements. F5B League event on July 16/17, will also count for the Nats trophy. F3B League event on July 30/31, will also count for the Nats trophy. F3K will be announced later. Links to the forum entry topics will appear here shortly. Mike Proctor
  7. until
    F3J League event in place of Interglide. Please see the topic below and enter via the forums or directly to Peter Allen. Email. lammacot@hotmail.com
  8. As last year the BMFA South Midlands Championships will be run over 2 days on Saturday 30th April and Sunday 1st May. The Saturday will be an F5J event and the Sunday F3J. Prizes for the winners each day but the overall South Midland Championship will be awarded on an results of both days. Entries here or to me by E mail to lammacot@hotmail.com
  9. With regret we announce the cancellation of the 2016 F3J Eurotour contest Interglide. Unfortunately a number of factors have conspired against organising the competition this year and the latest is the petrol shortages in France plus the air traffic controllers strike which mean that many European competitors may not be able to attend. Rather than allow entrants to book travel and accommodation which may have to be cancelled and not refunded we have made a decision to cancel the event. Instead we will be running a one day BMFA F3J league competition on Sunday 26th June, the Sunday scheduled for Interglide. It will take place at Edgcott using the F3J rules with UK variations which permits the use of winches. The entries which have been made for Interglide from UK competitors will be carried forward to this competition unless I hear otherwise. Any money paid for Interglide entry fee. camping, meals etc will be refunded less the entry fee for the revised competition.
  10. With regret we announce the cancellation of the 2016 F3J Eurotour contest Interglide. Unfortunately a number of factors have conspired against organising the competition this year and the latest is the petrol shortages in France plus the air traffic controllers strike which mean that many European competitors may not be able to attend. Rather than allow entrants to book travel and accommodation which may have to be cancelled and not refunded we have made a decision to cancel the event. Instead we will be running a one day BMFA F3J league competition on Sunday 26th June, the Sunday scheduled for Interglide. It will take place at Edgcott using the F3J rules with UK variations which permits the use of winches. The entries which have been made for Interglide from UK competitors will be carried forward to this competition unless I hear otherwise. Any money paid for Interglide entry fee. camping, meals etc will be refunded less the entry fee for the revised competition. View full news and information
  11. Hello F3x people, I'm working on a little design project, to come up with a dedicated set-up stand for f3f and f3b and maybe also f3j models. One aspect of it may allow super easy measurement and set up of CoG, integrated with the stand. I would be really grateful if people could share with me some design data, to help with the fine tuning of my ideas. Specifically 1. Approx Range of CoG for your F3f/F3b/F3j model. Ball park figures needed - no need to give away your winning edge ;-). At the moment I am working on 95mm +/-10mm - would this cover most competition models? 2. Range of flying weight would be very useful for stiffness and strength requirements. 3. Wing chord if you know it - there are a lot of good drawings out there, so this parameter is something that is reasonably easy for me to gather. 4. Fuselage width and depth, behind the wing TE. This list is a 'nice to have' - if you can just share the CoG range , that would be great. many thanks, Chris
  12. How often do we get a combination of high winds and gusty downpours at F3J contests? But no, for the F3J BMFA Nationals 2015, despite the horrible forecasts for the Bank Holiday weekend, Sunday was almost flat calm, wind maximum 3 mph, cloudy with rare glimpses of sun, a few drops of rain for 10 minutes which didn't bother anyone, and almost everyone enjoyed a tricky demanding competition. Almost everyone? Yes I fear that our stalwart Robin Sleight tried to fly someone else's model, convinced that he had everything under control despite several other pilots shouting warnings, ending in the inevitable vertical thump, well out of the field. We have all done it, some of us, like me, more than once. Very sad! The only other negative was the continuing reduction in the number of entries, only 15 pilots after two dropped out in the final days for perfectly genuine reasons. The Nats should be one of, if not the peak of the contest season. True the enforced switch from Cranwell to Retford's Wetlands might have dissuaded a few, but if F3J, F3B and other classes are to survive as viable contests, then successful efforts to recruit new enthusiasts are urgently required. As the penultimate competition in the series to select next year's team for the F3J World Championships in Slovenia, there were several nail biting rounds before the four man fly off was decided. Peter Allen, Colin Paddon, Mark Devall and Dave East had two rounds of struggle to try to achieve 15 minute flights as required, in conditions which earlier had allowed many pilots to fly the 10 minutes slots out. Surprise to me was that several times pilots found themselves worn out by having to coax their models ever so gently full time to utilise what little and rare lift was available. Peter Allen got closest to flying the full time out, just missing by about one minute, in the first round. This allowed him to decide on a relaunch two minutes into the second round, and he ended a comfortable and well deserved winner. By Sydney Lenssen (CD) Results Fly-Off table.tableizer-table { border: 1px solid #CCC; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; } .tableizer-table td { padding: 4px; margin: 3px; border: 1px solid #ccc; } .tableizer-table th { background-color: #4297C9; color: #FFF; font-weight: bold; } Rank Name Score Pcnt Raw Score Rnd1 Dur Rnd2 Dur Plty 1 Allen, Peter 1974.3 100 1974.3 1000 974.3 0 2 Paddon, Colin 1626.8 82.4 1626.8 626.8 1000 0 3 East, Dave 1539.7 77.99 1539.7 605.6 934.1 0 4 Devall, Mark 1173.5 59.44 1473.5 619.9 853.6 300 Preliminary Rounds table.tableizer-table { border: 1px solid #CCC; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; } .tableizer-table td { padding: 4px; margin: 3px; border: 1px solid #ccc; } .tableizer-table th { background-color: #4297C9; color: #FFF; font-weight: bold; } Rank Name Team Pilot Score Pcnt Raw Score Rnd1 Dur Rnd2 Dur Rnd3 Dur Rnd4 Dur Rnd5 Dur Plty Flyoff Total 1 Allen, Peter 1 42 4945.6 100 4945.6 1000 1000 998.8 946.8 1000 0 3 103 2 Devall, Mark 4 31 4909.7 99.27 4909.7 986.9 998.5 1000 990.3 934 0 1 100.27 3 East, Dave 2 46 4874.1 98.55 4874.1 1000 995.9 993.2 885 1000 0 1.5 100.05 4 Paddon, Colin 3 57 4872.9 98.53 4872.9 1000 1000 1000 1000 872.9 0 2 100.53 5 Osbourne, Ozzie 1 9 4698.7 95.01 4698.7 948.2 855.2 993 994.9 907.4 0 6 Jones, Neil 4 55 4671.2 94.45 4671.2 671.2 1000 1000 1000 1000 0 7 Dunster, Chas 1 8 4614.2 93.3 4614.2 983.6 666.6 984.3 996.4 983.3 0 8 Boorman, Colin 3 56 4596.4 92.94 4596.4 995.9 988.8 705.1 906.6 1000 0 9 Beale, Kevin 3 48 4572.9 92.46 4572.9 1000 1000 998.4 1000 574.5 0 10 Lipscombe, Al 2 50 4220.8 85.34 4220.8 662.9 991.4 869.1 990.6 706.8 0 11 Philcox, Cengiz 4 52 4080 82.5 4080 732.8 997.1 582.8 770.1 997.2 0 12 Raybone, Mike 2 32 4067.4 82.24 4067.4 662.8 1000 984.9 645.2 774.5 0 13 Duff, Ian 1 43 3987 80.62 3987 0 997.2 1000 1000 989.8 0 14 Shenstone, John 2 59 3789.3 76.62 3789.3 942.1 848.9 646 792.6 559.7 0 15 Sleight, Robin 4 60 1503.1 30.39 1503.1 0 0 0 678.4 824.7 0 16 Wicks, Graham 3 58 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  13. The 2015 F3J European Championship is underway in Dupnitsa Bulgaria. The British team of Peter Allen, Graham Wicks and Colin Paddon with helpers Kevin Dart, Ian Duff and Andre Borrossi. Have finished the first day with mixed results but the team is bonding well. Colin damaged one model on the practise day when the back of the fuselage left the rest of the model in a high wind launch, the rest of the model landed safely inverted. Although he wanted this model as one of his three a located model he did bring 4 so is still in the game. In the comp Peter had a mid air which removed his fin. He got the model down safely but has lost his light model which will make it harder in the morning light winds and light lift. the weather is very hot, 38C yesterday and will be the same all week. At lunch time the wind gets up and it gets harder to find and stay in lift. I will try to get some more information and photos when time permits, it's quite hectic being a manager.
  14. Wetlands, Retford, Notts F3J (Counts towards League) Entry: Bob Dickenson rfadickenson@yahoo.co.uk Note* F5J on Saturday to make a long weekend
  15. until
    Interglide F3J Eurotour 2015 http://www.interglide.co.uk
  16. Radioglide 2015 report by Garry Binnie is now on the main website. https://www.barcs.co.uk/home/news-and-information/radioglide-news/radioglide-2015-report-and-results/
  17. Once again it is my pleasure to collate an overall report for Radioglide, thanks to Alan Morton and Mike Fantham for the 100S and F3K reports. I hope my memory of events is correct, it was certainly a busy three days! Full results are available on the forum in their respective sections. Photos are either mine (F5J/F3J/Multi-launch) or Graham James (100S). Saturday F5J This increasing popular electric glider discipline attracted 12 competitors, I believe it was eight last year. The weather forecast predicted light winds, staying dry with an overcast sky, which was pretty much what we had. Despite the overcast the air felt warm and there was usable but fairly weak lift in every slot. Under the very able direction of Kevin Beale we got started, imagine my surprise when I checked the score sheet at the lunch break after four rounds to find that I was in the lead (but it wasn’t to last)!! We found that four minutes preparation time between slots was not quite enough so the computer timing programme was often paused. Another four rounds were flown after lunch and a dropped score came in to play. Following the weak lift downwind over the 100S field was the way to go and there were some squeaky final glides back but as the wind was light it looked more marginal than they actually were, most gliders making it back to the landing tape for a perfect landing. The majority of launches were around the 170-180 metre mark but a slot in Round 7 had everyone launching to a circling red kite at about 100 metres, this did not work well for me but it was a gamble that was worth taking. An amusing moment was timing for Dave East who did a lovely landing on the end of the tape, ‘100 points’ he announced, ‘I’ll give you 50’ says me with a chuckle, it’s easy to get confused! Models used were Maxas, Xplorers, Shadows, Tragi Clusters, an Ava and my Ray X on its second competition outing. The Ray X is a very stable model that ignores my overcontrolling flying style!! So…who won? In first place was Colin Paddon, second was Dave East and third was Peter Allen. Thanks to Kevin Beale for a smoothly run competition and a very enjoyable day out. F5J Results 100S Report from Alan Morton The 100s Radioglide competition took place on Saturday 23rd May 2015 I was CD for the day but had help from Graham James and Robin Sleight as well as my usual team mates, so not much left for me to do! We had the usual 5 rounds and 2 fly-offs and the day was enjoyable with light lift in a cool breeze. 11 of us flew most of which attend the regular Mike Lucas 100 inch competitions. The air was up and down as were the scores, I started with 2 bad scores but then came back to 4th and into the fly-off, others started well and lost out later on. Graham James flew very well throughout the comp and finished in top position before entering the fly-off. Kevin also flew well during the rounds and only lost out to Graham in round 2. John Shenstone was defending his title from last year and put on a good show finishing 3rd in the rounds. So into the fly off went Graham, Kevin, John and Alan. The round before was nothing special so with a 12 minute slot I was not going to rush, I decided to wait until someone else tested the air. Kevin had other ideas and launched on the buzzer. My mistake, he went straight into lift, I launched and was also in lift but now trailing his score. John had also launched early and Graham had waited with me. I was doing ok and Kevin was losing out, I continued to do well and Kevin continued to drop. With 5 or so minutes left he was very low and I was very high, I was confident that the only pilot threatening me now was John who was not as high as myself. Kevin however had other ideas, he held on at low level for the rest of the slot to win the 1000 points, unbelievable. The second slot started and we all launched simultaneously, I did manage to win by 1 second but we all flew it out so the positions didn’t change. A successful days flying and a well-deserved win from Kevin. RG-2015-100s-Results Kevin Newitt 100s Winner 2015 Radioglide 2015 100S Fly-off pilots. Alan Morton, Graham James,John Shenstone and Kevin Newitt Sunday Multi-launch The forecast for Sunday was not so good, similar to the previous day but with a promise of rain showers and possibly even the whole afternoon being affected by prolonged rain. There were some showers while we were setting up and one half-hour downpour which produced a natural lunch break but generally it stayed dry and we managed to complete four rounds. There were 18 competitors this year, over double the number for last year which was low due to the clash with F3J happening the same day. The mixture of launch types appeared to be roughly two-thirds using winches, a third flying electric models and one DLG flown by Maria Freeman (a fourth third?!). Tudor Farm has a large population of red kites and buzzards and they have become quite used to us invading their space and were very useful allies in enabling most slots to be flown out. Four preliminary rounds were flown, followed by a two-round fly-off. The top three were Peter Allen first (also best winch launched pilot), Graham Wicks second and Cengiz Philcox third. Kevin Beale was best placed electric glider in fourth (notable for the fact that he was flying an own-design prototype machine) with myself in eight place, which I was quite pleased with. Thanks to the joint team of Robin Sleight (CD) and Graham James/Peter Mitchell (chief number crunchers!) for a smooth competition. The field ropes were reset for the expected wind direction for Monday’s F3J competition. A planned EGM was held on the field after flying to formalise the proposed new arrangement of holding the BARCS AGM at Radioglide instead of at Oadby in December, this was carried unanimously. Peter Allen Radioglide 2015 Multilaunch Winner Monday F3J Up with the larks and back to Tudor Farm for the last day of Radioglide for the F3J competition (also a BMFA League Event and part of the British team selection for 2016). Weather was set to be the best day of the three, overcast sky again but fairly warm with a stiff breeze at times, plenty of lift available. 23 competitors rigged and set out their winches, with the competition starting just after 10 o’clock after a briefing from the CD, Sydney Lenssen. There was good lift available, marked by many birds, and like Saturday’s F5J, the best technique for staying airborne was to follow it downwind. This led to some very low landing approaches. Colin Boorman won a special prize for putting his Shadow in a tree trying to glide home, twice!! A two-round fly-off was held after five preliminary rounds with Neil Jones, Colin Paddon and Peter Allen taking the top three positions. At one stage I was fifth but dropped to tenth after having to relaunch in Round 7, still pleased though. My thanks to Sydney and team. Radioglide-F3J-2015-Overall-Results.xlsx Radioglide-F3J-Fly-off-Results.xlsx Colin Paddon Radioglide 2015 F3J Winner F3K Report from Mike Fantham. Ten pilots took part in the F3K contest on Monday 25th in conditions which varied from sunny and almost calm with strong lift to cloudy with a cool breeze and virtually no lift. The CD, Hayley Styche, had chosen tasks with the emphasis on fast ‘turn-arounds’, where a pilot needs to land at precisely the right moment and re-launch as quickly as possible. In the ‘Best 5 flights’ task, flown to a two minute max in a ten minute slot, Richard Swindells (the eventual winner) made 9:46 in what were less than ideal conditions. That’s an average of over 1:57 per flight – and remember he has to re-launch four times in the ten minutes! F3J was being flown at the same time as F3K and the ‘big’ models were often sharing the lift with us and the local Red Kites and Buzzards. As the start of my slot of ‘Last flight only’ was being counted down, a stack of Kites and F3J models was coming right at us in lift. I looked at the well-marked thermal and picked my spot. I launched on the hooter and was soon climbing rapidly in the core of the lift. The task here is to score over 5 minutes on your last launch of the slot. Three of us achieved the ideal solution in that slot – do 5 minutes on your first launch and make that your last one too! Sadly that was my only ‘ten minutes of fame’ and I returned to my normal form for the other rounds…. GBR Team Members Richard Swindells and Michael Stern came out on top with the Team reserve, Darius Zibikas in third. (Our third Team Member, Simon Jones, couldn’t make this event.) In only his second F3K contest, Carlos De Santos was fourth – a man to watch for in the future. It was a good contest in interesting conditions – thanks go to the BARCS committee for organising Radioglide and to Hayley Styche for getting us through ten rounds in smooth style. F3K Results A good launch sequence and model-on-approach shot by Vytautus Zibikas of brother, third-placing Darius Zibikas and his model. The model is the Lithuanian Stream, flown by the Zibikas Brothers from that country. Richard Swindells markets this model in the UK and also won the event flying one. THANKS TO CD'S AND ORGANISERS Would like to finish by thanking all the organisers and CD’s on behalf of the competitors, apologies if I missed anyone, it was a bit of a blur!! Overall it was a great weekend, lots of flying to be had, great camaraderie and banter. Congratulations to all competitors and in particular to Russell Mexome who took the Lilienthal Trophy for his first Radioglide and Peter Allen who took the Victor Ludorum for top placings in three events. On a personal note I was very encouraged by my half-time F5J result, still very much learning the ropes and benefited again from sage and calming spotting advice from Chas Dunster, the phrase ‘you can do this!’ works wonders. Slightly off-topic but something I’d like to add is that I rechecked my glider set-ups after the competition as I was not convinced that the poor handling I was seeing was all down to my fingers, sure enough the centre of gravities were too far aft and some of the control settings were way too sensitive. ‘Get there but get there smoothly’ I read recently (Mark Drela possibly), very true and I’ll try to keep that thought in my head. Cheers Gary Binnie
  18. From Mike Proctor, its a concern ! We have just been informed that it is most unlikely that we will have use of Cranwell for the SF Nats. Negotiations have been "difficult" this year and for some time this outcome has been on the cards. Indeed we have only just got final permission for the FF Nats in 5 weeks time! Frankly there seems to be no real reason behind this, other than that we are something they don't need at Cranwell. The fight goes on but prospects are low, at best. Clearly we need to make alternative provision for the SF Nats and fairly quickly. Points to consider are:- * We do not have a field anywhere, big enough to do 3 events/day. Several attempts by Chris Moynihan to find such a place were made relatively recently without success. The last time we were in this predicament we settled for a "split" Nats based on Pure gliders and E Gliders. * If we cannot have Cranwell we would probably be best advised to avoid Aug BH when quite a few people would like to go to Barkston. * If we were to spilt into F3K/B/J + 100S and F5J/F5B eSoaring Open + 2M we would have 4 events each to cram either into a weekend or possibly 3 day weekends. Each location would need camping on-field or locally *Where could these events fit into a calendar already sorted for 2015? I could offer Sept 12/13 which is scheduled as Wetlands Weekend anyway, for E Gliding but is only 2 weeks away from the Barkston Nats Could P Gliding go into early August, to be 2 or 3 weeks away from Nats but make both SF Nats a month apart. Would Edgecot be availabe? (It may well be that some CD's are not available on these dates) This is no more than a starter-for-10, written quickly after receiving the news from Dave Phipps. I look forward to your comments and realise that we need to think this through carefully but quickly, if it involves changing other events. Other then using the Wetlands, or try to find another venue and hold on a different day from main Power Nationals.
  19. Hello All, I've been flying about on and off for quite a few years, mostly slope. I live near to Whitesheet in Wiltshire, so the slope was a natural place to fly. Recently I've got more into DLG (ok, actually I have an elf, but it is just amazing!), but want to move into larger model flat-field/TD flying, with half an eye on F3j in the future. I've owned and flown an Ellipse before, so I have a little experience with larger and molded models. So... where and when is a good place to find other pilots to chat about things and to learn a bit about winch launching? Where does all this F3j business take place? Can anyone recommend a good flat field club to get in touch with? Last I heard, Lord's Hill had wound up and was mostly an Aerotow field in any case. I've done a little bungee launching (some lessons learned there, for sure) and have now bought a s/h Graupner winch, which I intend to use with an Allegro Lite I'm building. It would be nice to get some good advice (especially re winch safety) before I attempt this. Any help/advice/directions gladly received. all the best, Chris
  20. Colin Paddon triumphs as 2014 British Nationals F3J champion This year’s F3J Nationals was a real mixed bag, flying in airs which were nicely thermally for one slot, followed by widespread sink for the next. Sunday at the Nationals was a comfortable day with only moderate winds but with the prospect of heavy wind and rains for the second scheduled day. Many of the country’s leading pilots suffered miserable flights while more modest pilots walked away with 1,000 points, much to their surprise.   Looks relaxed, but the BMFA Nationals F3J contest managed to fly eight rounds on the Sunday contest, with no flyoffs, and then called it a day in view of the dire weather forecast for Bank Holiday Monday.   Congratulations to Colin Paddon, Mark Devall who had won the 100 inch contest the day before, and Graham Wicks who had also won the F5J contest on Saturday: they came first, second and third respectively in the F3J contest. Colin Paddon who had had a frustrating time at the World Championships a few weeks earlier, hit a consistency with six slots of 1,000 points each, and his dropped round was a 998.3 points flight. Team UK who had fared modestly in Martin, Slovakia a few weeks before, struggled at times but all came in the top six places at Cranwell. On a day of real challenge it was good to see Chas Dunster with a 1,000 and four rounds in the high 900s to give himself ninth place, and he spotted well for his team. Another encouraging performance was put in by Andre Borowski with three 1,000s, but he could have done with an extra throwaway score. Graham James, Barcs esteemed President, had a consistent day with scores rather higher than usual to gain 10th place in the field. All pilots deserved praise for remaining keen over a long day, 33 slots in an eight hour day kept everyone busy. The big rush was caused by the prospect of high winds and almost continuous rain forecast for Bank Holiday Monday. In the end contest director recommended that the contest should be curtailed and Monday was abandoned, and none of the pilots protested that decision. Over the past three years, the BMFA F3J league on which the British team is chosen for the next World or European championships - next year due to be held in Dupnitsa, Bulgaria - has been based on three two day events. Normally this means that the contests can have eight or more rounds and flyoff rounds where slot times go up to 15 minutes, said to be closer to the standards required at international level. Good thinking, but this year the weather has conspired to prevent flyoffs at Radioglide and the Nationals. That cannot be controlled, but good luck to next year’s UK Team! Sydney Lenssen. Results  
  21. Colin Paddon triumphs as 2014 British Nationals F3J champion This year’s F3J Nationals was a real mixed bag, flying in airs which were nicely thermally for one slot, followed by widespread sink for the next. Sunday at the Nationals was a comfortable day with only moderate winds but with the prospect of heavy wind and rains for the second scheduled day. Many of the country’s leading pilots suffered miserable flights while more modest pilots walked away with 1,000 points, much to their surprise. Congratulations to Colin Paddon, Mark Devall who had won the 100 inch contest the day before, and Graham Wicks who had also won the F5J contest on Saturday: they came first, second and third respectively in the F3J contest. Colin Paddon who had had a frustrating time at the World Championships a few weeks earlier, hit a consistency with six slots of 1,000 points each, and his dropped round was a 998.3 points flight. Team UK who had fared modestly in Martin, Slovakia a few weeks before, struggled at times but all came in the top six places at Cranwell. On a day of real challenge it was good to see Chas Dunster with a 1,000 and four rounds in the high 900s to give himself ninth place, and he spotted well for his team. Another encouraging performance was put in by Andre Borowski with three 1,000s, but he could have done with an extra throwaway score. Graham James, Barcs esteemed President, had a consistent day with scores rather higher than usual to gain 10th place in the field. All pilots deserved praise for remaining keen over a long day, 33 slots in an eight hour day kept everyone busy. The big rush was caused by the prospect of high winds and almost continuous rain forecast for Bank Holiday Monday. In the end contest director recommended that the contest should be curtailed and Monday was abandoned, and none of the pilots protested that decision. Over the past three years, the BMFA F3J league on which the British team is chosen for the next World or European championships – next year due to be held in Dupnitsa, Bulgaria – has been based on three two day events. Normally this means that the contests can have eight or more rounds and flyoff rounds where slot times go up to 15 minutes, said to be closer to the standards required at international level. Good thinking, but this year the weather has conspired to prevent flyoffs at Radioglide and the Nationals. That cannot be controlled, but good luck to next year’s UK Team! Sydney Lenssen. Results table.tableizer-table { border: 1px solid #CCC; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; } .tableizer-table td { padding: 4px; margin: 3px; border: 1px solid #ccc; } .tableizer-table th { background-color: #4297C9; color: #FFF; font-weight: bold; } Rank Name Score Pcnt Raw Score Rnd1 Dur Rnd2 Dur Rnd3 Dur Rnd4 Dur Rnd5 Dur Rnd6 Dur Rnd7 Dur Rnd8 Dur 1 Paddon, Colin 6999.1 100 7997.4 1000 1000 1000 1000 998.3 1000 999.1 1000 2 Devall, Mark 6914 98.78 7841.8 1000 997.5 1000 1000 938 1000 978.5 927.8 3 Wicks, Graham 6891.7 98.47 7494.7 991.3 969.9 603 1000 989.8 1000 946.8 993.9 4 Beale, Kevin 6871.7 98.18 7563.5 1000 691.8 892.6 993.2 1000 997.1 988.8 1000 5 Duff, Ian 6782.6 96.91 7459.6 980.8 677 837.5 983.3 994.5 1000 1000 986.5 6 Allen, Peter 6651.3 95.03 7112.1 991 865 1000 460.8 1000 795.3 1000 1000 7 Boorman, Colin 6523.9 93.21 6925.9 402 1000 570.3 986.6 993.7 987.8 985.5 1000 8 Borowski, Andre 6278.7 89.71 6771.7 880.9 1000 627.4 1000 1000 992.9 493 777.5 9 Dunster, Chas 6240.3 89.16 6240.3 995.3 976 1000 608.8 990 0 685.6 984.6 10 James, Graham 6021.7 86.04 6702.3 1000 827.6 680.6 816.2 858.7 699.8 964.6 854.8 11 Philcox, Cengiz 5924.2 84.64 6175.8 383.1 1000 616.3 251.6 1000 986 947.4 991.4 12 Osbourne, Ozzie 5923 84.63 5923 474.8 864.6 874.5 987.8 0 880.5 1000 840.8 13 Glover, Chris 5922.8 84.62 5922.8 890.4 900.6 0 693.2 601 840.1 1000 997.5 14 East, Dave 5545.1 79.23 5931.9 988.1 386.8 594.2 994.6 644.6 1000 852.2 471.4 15 Raybone, Mike 5515.5 78.8 5515.5 997.2 869.4 0 644.2 504.9 594.9 996.2 908.7 16 Binnie, Gary 4876.2 69.67 5297.8 893.6 730.6 631.4 531.6 421.6 655 491.1 942.9 17 Lipscombe, Al 4835.3 69.08 5384.7 955.6 669.4 650.7 721.4 549.4 733 552.9 552.3 18 Shenstone, John 4297 61.39 4504.2 526 399.9 207.2 509.8 912.8 531.8 817.3 599.4
  22. Uncle Sydney’s comment column F3J is in terminal decline Can rule changes save the sport? After one of the most exciting and well organised F3J World Championships in Martin, Slovakia earlier this month, it seems a little harsh to talk of the popularity of this thermal soaring class declining. But in most countries F3J is failing to attract new enthusiasts, especially among younger pilots. If nothing changes, the class will inevitably follow F3B and become a specialist competition, attracting only a handful of faithful and successful pilots straining to improve the technologies of exotic materials and manufacturing techniques, aerodynamics and weather skills, deterring all but the wealthy and dedicated. Today’s F3J is not the type of competition which appeals to ever larger numbers of pilots. F3J set out to be the simple thermal glider competition, easy for anyone to join in the early 1990s. Nobody wants to deny development. We cannot go back. But perhaps rule changes can boost numbers again. One evening at this year’s F3J WCs, Tomas Bartovsky, the jury president and CIAM’s soaring sub-committee chairman responsible for F3 classes of competition, called a technical meeting of team managers and pilots to discuss ideas which might improve the sport. He does this at every FAI championship. In earlier days of F3J, attendance at this opportunity was exciting with debates about whether to replace two man towing with winches, how to make landing points more discriminating by splitting the landing tape into 20cm rather than metre sections to gain or lose points, and other issues which have found their way into the rules. This year’s gathering was at the end of an exhausting very hot day and only 40 people or so came along. Most surprising to me was that there was a majority feeling that the joy of F3J competition – not the friendships – is definitely waning. Models have become expensive if you want to compete at the highest level, typically Euro 2,000 or more to get into the air, and you need three to be a serious contender. You require high quality towlines in abundance, capable of exerting very high tension before launching, so that heights of 200 metres plus can be gained with one to four seconds from launch. In Slovakia 26 senior teams entered but only seven full teams of three juniors. All countries are finding it difficult to encourage young pilots to join the sport. Overall entries in all but a few countries are dropping significantly. I can vouch for the United Kingdom. A few years ago it was normal for qualifying BMFA competitions to attract 60 or more entries; today even leading events struggle to get 20 late entries, very close to the minimum required to organise a fair matrix. The one saving and welcome blessing for soaring contests is that F5E has gained ground and attracts new recruits including those pilots who for one reason or another have given up on F3J. Even at FAI level, more delegates foresee F3B and F3J becoming extinct in the foreseeable future. Technical meeting Tomas started the technical discussion by tracing progress he has made over many years with different methods of starting the timing of the flight automatically when the towline comes away from the towhook. Getting this precise time is the most vulnerable for timekeepers because it depends on recognising the hook release. He has also worked on a device which accurately stops the clock when the glider touches the ground, which again can fool the timekeeper. Both these times are key to a fair competition where duration is measured to one tenth of a second, and margins between winning and losing are often down to one point. Tomas is not alone in exploring better methods of timing flights. Thomas Rossner in Germany has gone a long way with gadgets for the start and close of competition flights. The problems are legion, mainly due to cost and convenience and the financial rewards do not seem commensurate. Maximum wingspan and minimum wing loading The second topic was introduced by Philip Kolb, one of F3J’s handful of top world pilots, successful as Eurotour’s Contest winner numerous times, previous European champion and contest winner countless times. His suggestion for a possible rule change is to introduce a maximum wingspan for F3J models together with a minimum wing loading, at figures yet to be decided. This change would complicate the processing and registration to ensure compliance with such criteria, but similar rules apply in other competition classes. To make it work easily, pilots themselves would need to compete in a sportmanlike way, but careful scrutiny would probably be needed at international events. The effect of such changes would be twofold: in still kind air, a four metre ultra-light model weighing say 1.6 kg and launched to 200 metres can usually float out the 10 minute qualifying rounds. But at 2.2 kg or more with less than 3.5 metre wingspan, that duration at present is unlikely. If the model’s wingloading is increased to let’s say 28 or 30 gr/sqdm instead of the typical 20 gr/sqdm of today’s gliders, then fast tows in good weather would be slower due to acceleration factors. Timing accuracy would become less of an issue. These smaller models will be heavier by at least half a kilo, and that extra weight could be used to strengthen the wing and other parts far more cheaply than the current use of high tech materials and mouldings. Competitive models would be cheaper to produce. By coincidence I had heard arguments in favour of introducing minimum weight rules among teams from two countries earlier in the week when the early morning and late evening rounds in the championships had seen very calm and seemingly unlikely thermal help and yet many models flew out the time. Several pilots at the technical meeting spoke in favour of trying the effect of span maxima and wing loading minima, and at the request of Tomas, Phillip agreed to explore calculations on his various computer programs, then produce suggested weight and wing loading figures. He would then try to arrange a trial contest where volunteer pilots could test the ideas and check what effect they might have. Another distinct advantage to this idea is that it would not necessitate buying another set of suitable models because present models could be ballasted. Glider producers would not need to tool up quickly with different designs, although different models would inevitably come along in time. Taming one second rocket launches A couple of days earlier, I had been chatting with my friend Andre Borowski, one of the UK team’s towmen, about how to curb the current vogue for rocket launching, which has become an ever more common feature of F3J contests. For those not too familiar with high level contests, expert pilots can and often do take the opportunity to launch off the line at less than a second. They do not achieve the same height as a full tow, but they do reach sufficient height to fly into a patch of lift, 100-300 metres away, without too much risk for they are experts at reading air. Away they go to fly out the slot, often reaching the same height or more than their rivals in less than a minute. When they land on the 100 spot in the last second, they can record 9 minutes 58 seconds to claim their 1,000 points. It is not unusual these days for several pilots to use this approach in the flyoffs, and indeed if you don’t, you will probably never win the contest. My guess is that a rocket launch requires two mighty towmen and a launcher/pilot capable of holding a model on the towline pulling 40-50kg before kicking for the towmen to start running two seconds before the starting signal, by which time the line tension has been boosted 10-20 kg more. The line is a complete 150 metre bungee. It is spectacular, it is risky if the line breaks or if you don’t catch that low level lift. At championship level, half the senior pilots and several of the junior pilots used rocket launches safely and successfully. Some pilots claim that this technique adds to what is already part of the thrill of F3J, the mass launch of 12 or more gliders at the start of each slot. In my view it is also the feature which strikes fear and deters newcomers and especially young people from trying the sport. At the technical meeting I spoke unexpectedly and briefly about the idea which my friend had outlined a couple of days earlier. Why not have a rule which specifies that the towline must be lying on the ground at the start of working time with the model also on the ground near the end of the line? The towmen can be holding the towbar and hooked up to the pulley or direct tow if chosen. When the start signal is given, the pilot must hook his model to the line, at the pilot’s signal the towmen start to run, the launcher lets go when he decides the line tension is sufficient for his style of flying. If the pilot wants a really high tension, then he will need to wait for a second or two or three. If his glider will launch sufficiently fast and high with lower tension, then he can gain a second or two. Any reduction in line tension and speed of ascent will certainly mean that wings can be less strong/lighter, and models can be cheaper. This same method of starting slots can be employed in those countries who cannot raise sufficient numbers of towmen and need to resort to winch launching. I made the mistake in outlining this new start method as the “Monte Carlo” style launch, and many pilots at the meeting envisaged pilots racing across the safety corridor to hook up and signal the towmen. Not so. There is only a race to pick up the model and hook up. The pilot can stand by his glider and simply needs to bend down- if he is able!!! The immediate reaction at the technical meeting was that models would be flying dangerously from side to side with low tension and wind gusts, and there could be a risk of that in the early days. In the earliest days of thermal contests launching mid-airs were far more frequent, and some pilots held back to minimise destruction. I was invited to try to organise a trial of the technique in the UK, and I would be grateful if BARCS could find a way to trial the method. There are numerous ways of achieving the same objective, eliminating any advantage from rocket towing, for example, only starting the flight time five seconds after launch, and other variants. No change before 2017 Last but not least, as Tomas stressed in his meeting, CIAM only considers rule changes to the various classes in a phased two year pattern, and F3J rules can only be changed in 2016 for implementation in 2017 – unless such changes are made for safety reasons. Sydney Lenssen Read on... Joe Wurts, in his habitual bare feet, about to launch at Martin’s F3J world championships this month where in the final flyoff round of the contest he was pipped into second place by Jan Littva of Slovakia as 2014 world champion. Joe was one of the earliest protagonists of rocket launches. In this case, I heard him saying to his crew that he was going to take a safe launch. It lasted about 2 seconds. But during the week I saw him demonstrating a very high tension launch where he held the model with the tow-men running until the line broke, he fell to the ground but was still able to keep the model safe because he had had practice for this eventuality. He remains for me the world leading thermal pilot, he coaches his New Zealand team to continuing successes and willingly spreads his wisdom and skills in North Cyprus and other countries. Indeed he moved to New Zealand, some years ago now, from the USA after spending a few visits coaching and giving lectures in what became his new home country. Comments
  23. I was asked if I could collate the results and happenings at Tudor Farm for this year’s Radioglide competition so here’s my attempt! Saturday 24 May Two competitions were held on Saturday, F5J in one field and 100S across the road in the other. The day started with heavy rain and did not initially look promising so I held off at home until lunchtime, on the drive over from Brackley the weather improved greatly. The F5J started around 1:30, very ably directed by Bernie Jones. This was my first F5J competition and I found it very interesting in comparison to F3J, lots of tactics involved, do you use a short or long motor run etc. or in my case who do you follow! There was a soaring weather window of a couple of hours then light rain returned to end the fun. Eleven pilots took part, I was pleased to come eighth but the winner was Colin Boorman (pictured below and also his first F5J competition) closely followed by Colin Paddon and Kevin Beale. table.tableizer-table { border: 1px solid #CCC; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; } .tableizer-table td { padding: 4px; margin: 3px; border: 1px solid #ccc; } .tableizer-table th { background-color: #4297C9; color: #FFF; font-weight: bold; } PositionPilotScore1Colin Boorman3975.72Colin Paddon3926.63Kevin Beale36744Terry Pelling3198.25Colin Lucas3133.76Terry Weeks3098.37Graham Wicks2693.38Gary Binnie26019Peter Mitchell2588.910Kevin Dart2483.911Peter Allen2050.7Across the road the 100S guys directed by Alan Morton were launching regularly and we had a grandstand view of one Tracker’s demise on the line! 12 pilots competed in the 100S with John Shenstone a very worthy winner, Alan second and Neville Warby third. A joint F5J/100S prize giving was held after the 100S fly-off. 100s Scores table.tableizer-table { border: 1px solid #CCC; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; } .tableizer-table td { padding: 4px; margin: 3px; border: 1px solid #ccc; } .tableizer-table th { background-color: #4297C9; color: #FFF; font-weight: bold; } PilotRnd 1Rnd 2Rnd 3Rnd 4Rnd 5Final Score% ScorePosition11 Alan Morton1000998100010001000499810015 Neville Warby966976100010001000494298.921 Mark Deval10001000910954990485497.139 John Shenstone6109839521000994453990.843 John Stanswood86110008498031000451390.354 Graham James885896979746989449489.962 Gengiz Philcox9561000904902718448089.678 Robin Sleight837682839982829417083.487 Ken Goddard666757994641715377375.5910 Bob Dickinson610774842523668341768.41012 John Hulet9619678796010340868.2116 Alan Lipscombe100037510009530332766.612table.tableizer-table { border: 1px solid #CCC; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; } .tableizer-table td { padding: 4px; margin: 3px; border: 1px solid #ccc; } .tableizer-table th { background-color: #4196C8; color: #FFF; font-weight: bold; } slot 1TimeBonustotalrunning totalPoints Final Positions total% 1st9 John Shenstone100010011 Alan Morton5.550400400825 2nd11 Alan Morton82582.55 Neville Warby5.3750387387798 3rd5 Neville Warby79879.81 Mark Deval5.250370370763 4th1 Mark Deval76376.39 John Shenstone7.15504854851000 5th3 John Stanswood003 John Stanswood 000 6th4 Graham James004 Graham James 000 7th2 Gengiz Philcox002 Gengiz Philcox 000 8th8 Robin Sleight008 Robin Sleight 000 9th7 Ken Goddard007 Ken Goddard 000 slot 2 11 Alan Morton 000 5 Neville Warby 000 1 Mark Deval 000 9 John Shenstone 000 Sunday 25 May Sunday dawned with much better weather, a glance at various forecasts before I left home said that it would be breezy which it definitely was! Again, separate competitions were run in each field, Multi-launch and F3J (Day 1 of the team trials). F3J started promptly after briefing by Sydney Lenssen as the field had been set up on Saturday, blue skies and fluffy cumulus clouds had most people flying the slots out (but underestimating the wind strength and not making the landing tape in my case!). We could see the multi-launchers launching and I was puzzled why they seemed to stop very early. As there were only seven competitors they had whizzed through the four-round matrix, CD’d by Terry Weeks there were six electric flyers, one winch launcher and no DLG entrants. The result was Terry Weeks first (with a perfect score of 4000 points), followed by Ray Gadenne and Terry Pelling. Back to the F3J field we were all having fun with the challenging conditions, the slots seemed to alternate with good air and bad air, I did spy a few gliders being retrieved from adjacent fields! Mid-afternoon the whole grid of full-size gliders (from the Nationals at Lasham) filled the sky. They were on a 380 km cross-country task so their task setter had confidence in the conditions (300 k tasks are set on good days, 500 k tasks on ‘mega’ days). Sunday’s F3J ended after six rounds and plenty of sunburn! Monday 26 May Monday morning’s weather was almost the same as Saturday, steady light rain but the winds were much lighter. We had been asked to arrive early to help set the F3J field up which we did and then moved it again after some debate about what the wind direction was actually going to be. While we were moving the field around the F3K guys got off to an early start and could be seen staying airborne on nothing in the other field (and quite happily flying in the rain). The rain stopped and off we went with Round 7 of the F3J, I removed all the ballast from my Cluster and wondered how I was going to stay up for 10 minutes! My winch line bunched badly and my first ‘ping’ did not work as I think power had been cut and I was stuck on the line, second ping worked to nearly get me up with the rest of the gliders in that slot. We all floated about at minimum sink and managed to find ‘good air’ that was probably coming off of the chicken sheds (the smell was not so good however!). Fascinating to see the true glide performance of the models. Light rain returned halfway through Round 7, we hung around optimistically hoping that it would stop but it became obvious that the game was up. Round 7 slot scores were voided and there could be no fly-off. The F3J result (which was taken as the placings after Round 6) was Dave East first (5,744 points), Kevin Dart second and Neil Jones third. table.tableizer-table { border: 1px solid #CCC; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; } .tableizer-table td { padding: 4px; margin: 3px; border: 1px solid #ccc; } .tableizer-table th { background-color: #4297C9; color: #FFF; font-weight: bold; } RankNameRaw ScoreRnd1 DurRnd2 DurRnd3 DurRnd4 DurRnd5 DurRnd6 DurScorePcnt1East, Dave57441000941.9929.8988.6955.792857441002Dart, Kevin5724.91000768.610001000974.7981.65724.999.673Jones, Neil5690.9977.2981.71000776.6955.410005690.999.084Boorman, Colin5641.7996.1959.5856.210001000829.95641.798.225Paddon, Colin5478.7978.910001000992.21000507.65478.795.386Allen, Peter5433.7998.7614.61000930.81000889.65433.794.67Glover, Chris5394.3721.51000993.51000716.4962.95394.393.918Wicks, Graham5323.3772.4923.8986.51000752.3888.35323.392.689Beale, Kevin5310.5988.91000998.7687.6790.38455310.592.4510Osbourne, Ozzie5198756.41000953.3655.4832.91000519890.4911Johnson, Brian5163.510006071000793.8762.710005163.589.8912Devall, Mark5010.2843.6954981.4673.41000557.85010.287.2213Philcox, Cengiz4990.6846.11000781.5560.3817.2985.54990.686.8814Binnie, Gary4939.3734.6620863.3863.6991.7866.14939.385.9915Duff, Ian4923.1996.2736.2711.2985.7493.810004923.185.7116Borowski, Andre4893.61000663.97631000466.710004893.685.1917Dickenson, Bob4640.6966.2514.2974.5483.2989.8712.74640.680.7918Stanswood, Jon4600.5790.9678864.5549.7767.7949.74600.580.0919Shenstone, John4165.7407.1807.2759.1875.9619697.44165.772.5220Raybone, Mike40970854.7813.3572.61000856.4409771.3321Dunster, Chas4096.510000682.4505.4945.3963.44096.571.3222James, Graham3672.9786.682.1478.5802.2618.3905.23672.963.9423Lipscombe, Al3025.9747.40365.1577.7637.2698.53025.952.6824Lloyd, Rick000000000Meanwhile over in the other field the F3K chaps were still flying. CD’d by Lorry Green the result was first Richard Swindells, second Darius Zibikas and third Vytautus Zibikas. And there it was, all over for another year! Shame that the weather played a part in spoiling what is always a great weekend, my thanks to all the organisers and CDs. Gary Binnie. Radioglide results from the other classes. Radioglide 2014 F3K results and report Radioglide 2014 Multilaunch results and report
  24. By Colin Paddon Over the past few years I have campaigned a Cluster for a lot of my F3J competition flying. During this time it has notched up many high level competition wins for myself and others in the UK. Its always been my “Go To” plane when the wind gets up, ie most of the time here in the UK. However it is an excellent all rounder that really deserves more recognition on the world F3J stage than it gets. I have always thought, along with others, that the moment arm on the standard Cluster fuselage was a tad short and that the rudder was a little small in area. The short moment arm has since been addressed by Heino, producer of the Cluster who has introduced a longer moment arm fuselage but only so far in V Tail form, which for me, wasn’t the way I wanted to go. We are all hoping that Heino will be producing a 3.8m Cluster wing sometime in the near future too. Whilst attending the European Championships in Turkey last year, a potential solution to both my own and Graham Wicks thoughts appeared in the form of a new beautifully made Spread Tow (ST) cross tail fuselage that was being produced by renowned TRNC flyer, Eser Kismer. The fuselage Eser produces is in fact an alternative for Nan’s own Xplorer fuselages which, of course, have a different wing section and mounting screw placement to the Cluster wing so some work to retrofit it would be necessary. Having seen the fuselage all the UK team immediately placed an order for one and then awaited delivery. After a short delay due to sorting out some logistical issues, the fuselages duly turned up in the UK courtesy of TNT. Courier costs spread between the three of us ended up being pretty reasonable all things considered. Eser’s ST fuselages are light, small in cross section, extremely strong and look great! The fuselage came supplied with a nice carbon ballast tube which can accommodate up to approximately 700g of lead ballast if required. They come with a very novel servo tray/carrier which is completely pre-assembled in high quality laser cut ply and is designed to be held in place by a large single rear positioned bolt. I modified the servo carrier slightly to provide an additional fixing at the front for extra security. See pics. We also bought matching spread tow tailplanes with the fuselages but it was obvious that it was designed/sized for 3.8/4m wings and therefore looked “wrong” with the smaller Cluster wing. Fortunately the existing Cluster tailplane was a good fit without modification to the new fuselage so it was decided to use this which looked absolutely “Right”. The pictures tell the whole story of how it was modified and ended up looking so nuff said. The new Cluster wing being mated to the fuselage was Heino’s extra strong lay-up meaning that it can take anything you throw at it. Total AUW ended up at 1840g which meant that it had the potential to not only be a great windy weather model with ballasting but that it was light enough to be a good all rounder too. With some further modifications I have in mind I hope to get this AUW down to below 1800g . A week or so later it was ready to fly. Of course, on the day, it was blowing a gale but as they were the very conditions the wing had shown itself to excel in, we went ahead. A full-on F3J Ober winch was duly set-up on the field and we were ready to go and go we did! What can I say other than that the performance has exceeded all expectations. The on board testing vario confirmed that the average launch height ranged from 205 -215 metres without any “dialing in” or ballast being used. Penetration has improved with there being less fuselage cross sectional drag too. Ease of circling/thermal turning has without doubt also improved making it extremely easy to fly at distance. Stability/behaviour on tow is exemplary whilst its landing tracking/behaviour is first class. The strength of the fuselage was fully tested out early on when for the first time in over 15 years I managed to get the towline hooked around the tailplane after a somewhat over exuberant launch dip/zoom. The plane ended up inverted despite my best efforts to untangle it whilst providing a great impression of a spinning falling leaf until it hit the ground flat pancake style from some height. Only damage was a small crack at the base of the fin where it meets the top of the fuselage which was easily fixed along with a minor cut line into one half of the tailplane’s leading edge, again easily fixed. Very annoying as it always seems to happen to brand new planes rather than old one’s. Why is that! Although I may be a little biased being a designer myself, I think this has to be one of the prettiest looking models I have ever owned. Others can make up their own minds on this of course from the pictures. I feel this plane will be a welcomed addition to my existing competition models hanger. In the coming weeks I will be fine tuning the models set-up to optimise performance. Colin Paddon.
  25. We are going to try and run this warm up weekend, where we hope to have all and any Glider practice with winch lines out and as much help as we can provide, there will be a few fun type comps on both days but most of all hopefully a good turn out and good weather. Hopefully the UK F3J team will be there, if not all of them some of them on at least one of the days, if you have any questions or want any information, they are a friendly bunch honest, (they also will be grateful to receive any donations towards the team travel fund see me and I will point you in the right direction) We also hope to have some of the top F5J/eSoaring pilots there for you to pick the brains of as well, and of course I will be there ! The weekend is free to attend and will be run as a training workshop with a few fun comps thrown in, look out for the signs from the road, we hope to be in the second field on the left up the drive passed the double cross gates through the gate in the tree line just before the house on the right, when turning into the field go right up the hill and keep close to the hedge where the ground is OK at the moment. Further details will follow; please if you are going to attend let me know via this thread on the eSoaring Forum http://www.esoaring.net/forum/viewtopic.php?p=13567#p13567 or my email: Bernie@esoarer.co.uk or mobile O774O 181861 Here's hoping for a bit of that eSoaring Pillerton Hersey weather we had last weekend Bernie