Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'f5j'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • News & Information
    • BARCS
    • BMFA Nationals
    • Radioglide
    • F3J
    • General News
  • Articles

Categories

  • Contest Reports
  • Articles
  • Radioglide
  • Interglide
  • BMFA Nationals
  • News and Information

Categories

  • Contest Reports
  • Articles
  • News and Information
  • BARCS Interglide F5J

Categories

  • Articles
  • Contest Reports
  • News and Information

Categories

  • Articles
  • Radioglide
  • Contest Reports
  • News and Information

Categories

  • Articles
  • Contest Reports
    • Radioglide
  • News and Information

Categories

  • Articles
  • Contest Reports
  • News and Information

Categories

  • Articles
  • Contest Reports
  • News and Information

Blogs

There are no results to display.

Forums

  • BARCS
    • News and Information
    • BARCS Matters
    • Radioglide
  • Aircraft
    • Slope & Dynamic Soaring
    • F3F/F3B
    • F3K and Handlaunch
    • Thermal and F3J
    • Electric Soaring and F5J
    • Multi-Launch
    • Free Flight
    • RC Equipment
    • Builders Workshop
    • Other Soaring
  • Other Subjects
    • General Discussion
    • New Members
    • For Sale/Wanted
    • Forum Guides, How-to's and Updates
    • Ask a Question about using the forum and website

Calendars

  • Event Calendar

Marker Groups

  • Members
  • Flying Sites

Found 62 results

  1. It's been over a year since I (Colin Paddon) and Kevin Beale first posted details of our home built and designed 3.8m composite F5J glider, PROGLIDE. The original article can be found at this link: https://www.barcs.co.uk/f5j/articles-events-and-reports/articles/proglide-homebuilt-f5j-soarer/ This update brings us up to date with the project. It’s all very well designing and building your own competition plane but its not worth a lot if it turns out to be lacking in performance compared to the professionally manufactured gliders that it will be flying against. There seems to be a general misconception that home built F5J competition gliders are in some way inferior to the professional commercial offerings in terms of their flying performance. Straight away lets dispel this myth. The prototype PROGLIDE in its first full year of competition use won three UK F5J league competitions and finished 2nd in the 2016 National UK F5J league with an overall score of 99.06%. Myth dispelled. The only downside of designing and producing your own composite F5J plane is the time and effort it takes to do. If we paid ourselves 50p per hour for all the time we have put into this project we still wouldn’t be able to afford to buy them! It’s a complete labour of love in every way but the sense of achievement makes it all worthwhile. A quick look at the web gallery that accompanies this article will give you some idea of the time and effort that has gone into achieving our original goal which was that it must be economical to build, use techniques that anyone with reasonable building skills can learn/do and most importantly have as good a flight performance as the commercial offerings. Achieving the 100% perfect finish compared to the hollow moulded professionally produced planes was not a high priority. We were only interested in its flight performance and were happy to accept a good finish as opposed to a perfect one. During the development period we worked in parallel on different areas of design/construction. For example I decided that I wanted to be able to split the fuselage in half for ease of air transport which meant that the elevator and rudder servo’s were both enclosed within the tailplane mount pod with the boom being secured to the Fuselage Pod spigot by two carbon tubes that could be removed and the boom slid off. Ditto the fin/rudder assembly. Kevin worked on optimising his layout with the servos under the wing at first followed later by the elevator servo in the tailplane pod and the rudder servo under the wing. For his Fin/Rudder he went along a similar route that the Nan Xplorers use. Finding easy to do home build solutions to problems took time, effort and testing. One of the things that several people asked us about was how we made the wing joiners. In the end it was so simple that I wondered why I hadn’t thought of it before. Buy yourself from HobbyKing a protruded 10x10mm square section carbon rod which comes with a 8mm dia hole all the way through it. Cut into required joiner lengths and angle the two inner end faces to the required angle. Roll up 40mm of unicarbon tows to achieve a tight fit inside the hole, wet out fully with epoxy and slide it half way into one half of the joiner and then the other. Put balsa caps down the hole so that it just very slightly compresses the central wet unicarbon and keeps them centrally located within the length of the joiner and then clamp into required position and allow to set. Result, pair of carbon joiners that weigh 23g total. The plane would be destroyed before the wing joiners broke. This technique wouldn’t be strong enough for F3J planes but more than adequate for our lesser stressed F5J models. Quick, cheap and foolproof with the ability to create any angle of joiners you require. Kevin went a different route by using straight solid round carbon rod which allowed him in our normal wing section to get the required dihedral tip angle he wanted. All this problem solving sounds as if it was a PITA, and at times it felt that way, but in reality we both enjoyed finding home build solutions to these challenges. The first two Proglide’s produced used cheap fibreglass cloth on the flying surfaces which enabled us to learn the required composite skills knowing that when it goes wrong (it will BTW!) that it hadn’t cost the earth in materials. However, the aim was always to eventually use Carboline which is a fantastic cloth but it’s not without good reason that it’s called “Black Gold”, its very expensive but gives a strength to weight ratio that is unbeatable for our purpose. The early fibreglass skinned versions of PROGLIDE achieved RTF weights of between 1450-1580g, ie still reasonably light for a full house 3.8m electric plane. With each new plane we tried different lay-up’s, build techniques and incorporated various detail design changes along the way. Lots of time was expended in producing test pieces during this period to prove the viability of what we were doing. We had failures along the way on pieces that we felt sure would work well but turned out not to be of the standard we were seeking. Amongst the various failures though we managed to have some light bulb moments which were always welcomed! One such moment came when we started to investigate how to achieve repeatable 100% success with shaped inflation bladders in the moulding of the fuselage pod in order to minimise the weight. After quite a few failures it turned out that a fine tipped soldering iron and Recycled black rubbish bags (yes really) worked brilliantly. The variable air pressure for this task was handled by a £50 EBay airbrush compressor which had a small air reservoir tank. After trying various layups, like most of the professional manufacturers, we have now settled on using all carbon for the fuse pods. Another light bulb moment came in regard to hinging the flying surfaces. At first we used silicon hinges which did work but were relatively heavy and difficult to get perfect every time. We later moved to using Diamond tape for the hinge along with Microfibre tape on the inner faces of the foam. (Microfibre tape sticks like the proverbial to raw pink foam). This resulted in strong, lightweight quick to apply, field serviceable (if required) hinges that were very free in their movement. They have turned out to be every bit as good as silicon hinges and in many respects far better. After building a few Proglides we felt confident enough to move onto using Carboline. We also decided at this point that we would again take advantage of having two of us involved. Kevin’s first Carboline PROGLIDE was to use our normal wing section whilst mine was going to use one of the new F5J Syner ultra-thin wing sections. We had hoped to use a friend’s CNC foam cutter for this new prototype wing but unfortunately he moved house just at the wrong time and we all know how much time they take up to get sorted out. So, yet more wing /spar templates to make! Using such a thin wing section on a 3.8m wing brought with it a host of new structural problems to overcome and additionally neither of us was totally convinced that these Ultra-Thin wing sections were the right way to go for F5J. Kevin progressed quickly on his first Carboline build as we now knew exactly how and what to do. He made no attempt to get this plane down to be a super lightweight and used standard sized servo’s with a heavy motor/ESC/battery in the fit out. Even so the finished RTF weight came in at just under 1440g. He estimated that had he used lightweight equipment the finished RTF weight would have been easily under 1300g. The project was moving in the right direction. After flying it Kevin liked his PROGLIDE so much that he immediately decided to press on and make a full on lightweight Carboline version. This ultra lightweight PROGLIDE, which he seemed to put together in record time, came in at 1280g. It fly’s superbly. Meanwhile, it took me a while to iron out the new structural issues raised when building a 3.8m solid core ultra-lightweight thin section wing. Eventually though we were ready to proceed with the build. Did it go smoothly, of course not! Due to a stupid error on my part during the bagging up of the centre panel, I managed to ruin the entire panel. It was an expensive and time consuming mistake to make. After the required amount of San Miguel I decided to build a new centre section straight away. I took this “opportunity” to try a different approach with the spar structure. The rest of the build thankfully went without a hitch. The plane RTF came in at 1245g using lightweight radio gear, 1000mah 3S Hv Lipo and a 85g direct drive motor. All that was needed now was to test fly it to see if it performed as well as we hoped it would. Following several test flying sessions we can report that its flight performance has exceeded all expectations. All preconceived negative thoughts on whether ultra-thin wing sections would work well for F5J have been dispelled. In light of the successful flight testing of the first thin wing PROGLIDE we have decided to build a heavier windy weather version using the same thin wing section. In the meantime the Carboline Ultra light just tested can be ballasted to 1550g AUW which hopefully will be capable of handling a decent amount of wind (yet to be tested). But as we all know, here in the UK there’s times when you just need a heavy plane. For those that are interested in weights here they are. Part Finished Weight With Gear Installed Weight Carbon Fuse Pod 89g 135g Boom & Tailplane Mount 35g 55g Centre Panel 263g 333g Left Wing Tip 128g 150g Right Wing Tip 130g 152g Elevator 33g 35g Fin/Rudder/Tube 24g 24g Prop/Spinner/Motor 113g ESC 50g Other installed equipment 78g Total AU RTF Weight 1245g In terms of airframe material costs, the fibreglass skinned versions come in at around £100-£130 and Carboline versions at £200-£250. Labour cost….well let’s not go there! Overall, somewhat cheaper for an equivalent commercially produced 3.8m F5J model at this kind of weight! So what next? We are confident that we can further reduce the overall weight with minor detail changes, improved lay-ups etc, but recognise that we are getting close to what can realistically be achieved in this regard with home building. A picture really does say a thousand words, so if you are interested in seeing how the PROGLIDE is constructed, the photo web gallery that accompanies this write up shows all. If you have any specific questions about the plane or its construction please feel free to ask on this thread. Colin Paddon/Kevin Beale View full f5j article event or report
  2. Another excellent looking F5J model coming soon - maiden today at Vitoria, Spain. Designer Jorge Medina (Tecnoepoxy). RTF weight 1300g, 4m span: Simon
  3. For those that say all F3J/F5J models look the same ( @EssexBOF ), the latest from Joe Wurts/Vladimir: Simon
  4. It's been over a year since I (Colin Paddon) and Kevin Beale first posted details of our home built and designed 3.8m composite F5J glider, PROGLIDE. This update brings us up to date with the project. It’s all very well designing and building your own competition plane but its not worth a lot if it turns out to be lacking in performance compared to the professionally manufactured gliders that it will be flying against. There seems to be a general misconception that home built F5J competition gliders are in some way inferior to the professional commercial offerings in terms of their flying performance. Straight away lets dispel this myth. The prototype PROGLIDE in its first full year of competition use won three UK F5J league competitions and finished 2nd in the 2016 National UK F5J league with an overall score of 99.06%. Myth dispelled. The only downside of designing and producing your own composite F5J plane is the time and effort it takes to do. If we paid ourselves 50p per hour for all the time we have put into this project we still wouldn’t be able to afford to buy them! It’s a complete labour of love in every way but the sense of achievement makes it all worthwhile. A quick look at the web gallery that accompanies this article will give you some idea of the time and effort that has gone into achieving our original goal which was that it must be economical to build, use techniques that anyone with reasonable building skills can learn/do and most importantly have as good a flight performance as the commercial offerings. Achieving the 100% perfect finish compared to the hollow moulded professionally produced planes was not a high priority. We were only interested in its flight performance and were happy to accept a good finish as opposed to a perfect one. During the development period we worked in parallel on different areas of design/construction. For example I decided that I wanted to be able to split the fuselage in half for ease of air transport which meant that the elevator and rudder servo’s were both enclosed within the tailplane mount pod with the boom being secured to the Fuselage Pod spigot by two carbon tubes that could be removed and the boom slid off. Ditto the fin/rudder assembly. Kevin worked on optimising his layout with the servos under the wing at first followed later by the elevator servo in the tailplane pod and the rudder servo under the wing. For his Fin/Rudder he went along a similar route that the Nan Xplorers use. Finding easy to do home build solutions to problems took time, effort and testing. One of the things that several people asked us about was how we made the wing joiners. In the end it was so simple that I wondered why I hadn’t thought of it before. Buy yourself from HobbyKing a protruded 10x10mm square section carbon rod which comes with a 8mm dia hole all the way through it. Cut into required joiner lengths and angle the two inner end faces to the required angle. Roll up 40mm of unicarbon tows to achieve a tight fit inside the hole, wet out fully with epoxy and slide it half way into one half of the joiner and then the other. Put balsa caps down the hole so that it just very slightly compresses the central wet unicarbon and keeps them centrally located within the length of the joiner and then clamp into required position and allow to set. Result, pair of carbon joiners that weigh 23g total. The plane would be destroyed before the wing joiners broke. This technique wouldn’t be strong enough for F3J planes but more than adequate for our lesser stressed F5J models. Quick, cheap and foolproof with the ability to create any angle of joiners you require. Kevin went a different route by using straight solid round carbon rod which allowed him in our normal wing section to get the required dihedral tip angle he wanted. All this problem solving sounds as if it was a PITA, and at times it felt that way, but in reality we both enjoyed finding home build solutions to these challenges. The first two Proglide’s produced used cheap fibreglass cloth on the flying surfaces which enabled us to learn the required composite skills knowing that when it goes wrong (it will BTW!) that it hadn’t cost the earth in materials. However, the aim was always to eventually use Carboline which is a fantastic cloth but it’s not without good reason that it’s called “Black Gold”, its very expensive but gives a strength to weight ratio that is unbeatable for our purpose. The early fibreglass skinned versions of PROGLIDE achieved RTF weights of between 1450-1580g, ie still reasonably light for a full house 3.8m electric plane. With each new plane we tried different lay-up’s, build techniques and incorporated various detail design changes along the way. Lots of time was expended in producing test pieces during this period to prove the viability of what we were doing. We had failures along the way on pieces that we felt sure would work well but turned out not to be of the standard we were seeking. Amongst the various failures though we managed to have some light bulb moments which were always welcomed! One such moment came when we started to investigate how to achieve repeatable 100% success with shaped inflation bladders in the moulding of the fuselage pod in order to minimise the weight. After quite a few failures it turned out that a fine tipped soldering iron and Recycled black rubbish bags (yes really) worked brilliantly. The variable air pressure for this task was handled by a £50 EBay airbrush compressor which had a small air reservoir tank. After trying various layups, like most of the professional manufacturers, we have now settled on using all carbon for the fuse pods. Another light bulb moment came in regard to hinging the flying surfaces. At first we used silicon hinges which did work but were relatively heavy and difficult to get perfect every time. We later moved to using Diamond tape for the hinge along with Microfibre tape on the inner faces of the foam. (Microfibre tape sticks like the proverbial to raw pink foam). This resulted in strong, lightweight quick to apply, field serviceable (if required) hinges that were very free in their movement. They have turned out to be every bit as good as silicon hinges and in many respects far better. After building a few Proglides we felt confident enough to move onto using Carboline. We also decided at this point that we would again take advantage of having two of us involved. Kevin’s first Carboline PROGLIDE was to use our normal wing section whilst mine was going to use one of the new F5J Syner ultra-thin wing sections. We had hoped to use a friend’s CNC foam cutter for this new prototype wing but unfortunately he moved house just at the wrong time and we all know how much time they take up to get sorted out. So, yet more wing /spar templates to make! Using such a thin wing section on a 3.8m wing brought with it a host of new structural problems to overcome and additionally neither of us was totally convinced that these Ultra-Thin wing sections were the right way to go for F5J. Kevin progressed quickly on his first Carboline build as we now knew exactly how and what to do. He made no attempt to get this plane down to be a super lightweight and used standard sized servo’s with a heavy motor/ESC/battery in the fit out. Even so the finished RTF weight came in at just under 1440g. He estimated that had he used lightweight equipment the finished RTF weight would have been easily under 1300g. The project was moving in the right direction. After flying it Kevin liked his PROGLIDE so much that he immediately decided to press on and make a full on lightweight Carboline version. This ultra lightweight PROGLIDE, which he seemed to put together in record time, came in at 1280g. It fly’s superbly. Meanwhile, it took me a while to iron out the new structural issues raised when building a 3.8m solid core ultra-lightweight thin section wing. Eventually though we were ready to proceed with the build. Did it go smoothly, of course not! Due to a stupid error on my part during the bagging up of the centre panel, I managed to ruin the entire panel. It was an expensive and time consuming mistake to make. After the required amount of San Miguel I decided to build a new centre section straight away. I took this “opportunity” to try a different approach with the spar structure. The rest of the build thankfully went without a hitch. The plane RTF came in at 1245g using lightweight radio gear, 1000mah 3S Hv Lipo and a 85g direct drive motor. All that was needed now was to test fly it to see if it performed as well as we hoped it would. Following several test flying sessions we can report that its flight performance has exceeded all expectations. All preconceived negative thoughts on whether ultra-thin wing sections would work well for F5J have been dispelled. In light of the successful flight testing of the first thin wing PROGLIDE we have decided to build a heavier windy weather version using the same thin wing section. In the meantime the Carboline Ultra light just tested can be ballasted to 1550g AUW which hopefully will be capable of handling a decent amount of wind (yet to be tested). But as we all know, here in the UK there’s times when you just need a heavy plane. For those that are interested in weights here they are. table.tableizer-table { font-size: 12px; border: 1px solid #CCC; font-family: Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif; } .tableizer-table td { padding: 4px; margin: 3px; border: 1px solid #CCC; } .tableizer-table th { background-color: #104E8B; color: #FFF; font-weight: bold; padding: 10px; } Part Finished Weight With Gear Installed Weight Carbon Fuse Pod 89g 135g Boom & Tailplane Mount 35g 55g Centre Panel 263g 333g Left Wing Tip 128g 150g Right Wing Tip 130g 152g Elevator 33g 35g Fin/Rudder/Tube 24g 24g Prop/Spinner/Motor 113g ESC 50g Other installed equipment 78g Total AU RTF Weight 1245g In terms of airframe material costs, the fibreglass skinned versions come in at around £100-£130 and Carboline versions at £200-£250. Labour cost….well let’s not go there! Overall, somewhat cheaper for an equivalent commercially produced 3.8m F5J model at this kind of weight! So what next? We are confident that we can further reduce the overall weight with minor detail changes, improved lay-ups etc, but recognise that we are getting close to what can realistically be achieved in this regard with home building. A picture really does say a thousand words, so if you are interested in seeing how the PROGLIDE is constructed, the photo web gallery that accompanies this write up shows all. If you have any specific questions about the plane or its construction please feel free to ask on this thread. Colin Paddon/Kevin Beale
  5. Tonbridge BMFA F5J League Event - Sunday 18 June 2017 Tonbridge club are hosting a BMFA League F5J competition at Leigh Park Farm, Nr Tonbridge, Kent on Sunday 18 June 2017. We will be running a relaxed and fun competition for both existing competition flyers and new pilots alike. All welcome. Directions to the field can be found here: https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Leigh+Park+Farm/@51.2091254,0.19327,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x47df4fda3f5fd36d:0xfd76d04136677dd9?hl=en The competition will be run to F5J rules with UK variations as published by the BMFA. Copy of the full rules can be found here: https://bmfa.org/DesktopModules/Bring2mind/DMX/Download.aspx?Command=Core_Download&EntryId=2078&language=en-GB&PortalId=0&TabId=219 The main points for BMFA F5J comps are: - Either Open or 2m may be flown, not both. - Motor restart may be used (results in a zero flight score), and therefore you need only use your eSoaring switch BUT you must reset the (200m) height limit to 300m this can often be done easily by using a reader, otherwise use a computer. - As in eSoaring, you must provide a reader, so that your timekeeper can check your launch height immediately after landing. - Minimum of 4 rounds to be flown. - CD will announce whether or not a Fly-Off will be flown before the start. - Book in from 9am. First flight’s at 10am Entry fee £10.00 (BMFA requirement) payable on the day. Proof of insurance (BMFA membership card is sufficient) required Closing date for entries is 6.00pm Friday 16th June In the event that there is any doubt as to whether the event will be run due to forecasted inclement weather, a final decision will be posted on the BARCS and Esoaring websites by no later than 4pm on Saturday 17th June. We look forward to seeing you on the field. Graham Wicks - Contest CD Please enter this competition by posting here on this thread: 1) Your name 2) Class being entered - i.e. OPEN or 2 METRE 3) Preferred Frequency if on 35Mhz. 4) BMFA Number Entry list to date: 1. Graham Wicks, Open, 2.4, BMFA 052827 2. Colin Boorman, Open 2.4, BMFA tba 3. Kevin Beale, Open, 2.4, BMFA 040788 4. Colin Paddon, Open, 2.4, BMFA 073473
  6. BARCS INTERGLIDE 2017 24th-25th June, Near Ashford, Kent This year’s event will be run by the British Association of Radio Control Soarers. Traditionally an F3J event, to reflect the rise in popularity of electric launch soaring this year we will be run to International F5J rules. The competition is registered as a EUROTOUR and World Cup event and will count towards all relevant National and International Leagues. Location and Dates The site is a large, private airfield located approx. 5miles south of Ashford, Kent allowing easy access from the M20, Eurostar, Ferry Terminals and local Hotels. The Hamilton Farm Airstrip, Bilsington, Ashford Kent, TN25 7JJ. Website for more information: http://www.hamiltonfarmairstrip.co.uk/ Enter online or by form to be found on the Interglide website. https://www.interglide.co.uk/ Closing Date Friday 16th June. Restricted to 60 entries Download BULLETIN 1 BARCS INTERGLIDE 2017 F5J Bulletin 1 Final.pdf
  7. BARCS INTERGLIDE 2017 24th-25th June, Near Ashford, Kent This year’s event will be run by the British Association of Radio Control Soarers. Traditionally an F3J event, to reflect the rise in popularity of electric launch soaring this year we will be run to International F5J rules. The competition is registered as a EUROTOUR and World Cup event and will count towards all relevant National and International Leagues. Location and Dates The site is a large, private airfield located approx. 5miles south of Ashford, Kent allowing easy access from the M20, Eurostar, Ferry Terminals and local Hotels. The Hamilton Farm Airstrip, Bilsington, Ashford Kent, TN25 7JJ. Website for more information: http://www.hamiltonfarmairstrip.co.uk/ Enter online or by form to be found on the Interglide website. https://www.interglide.co.uk/ Closing Date Friday 16th June. Restricted to 60 entries Download BULLETIN 1 BARCS INTERGLIDE 2017 F5J Bulletin 1 Final.pdf Forum Topic below View full f5j article event or report
  8. BARCS INTERGLIDE 2017 24th-25th June, Near Ashford, Kent This year’s event will be run by the British Association of Radio Control Soarers. Traditionally an F3J event, to reflect the rise in popularity of electric launch soaring this year we will be run to International F5J rules. The competition is registered as a EUROTOUR and World Cup event and will count towards all relevant National and International Leagues. Location and Dates The site is a large, private airfield located approx. 5miles south of Ashford, Kent allowing easy access from the M20, Eurostar, Ferry Terminals and local Hotels. The Hamilton Farm Airstrip, Bilsington, Ashford Kent, TN25 7JJ. Website for more information: http://www.hamiltonfarmairstrip.co.uk/ Enter online or by form to be found on the Interglide website. https://www.interglide.co.uk/ Closing Date Friday 16th June. Restricted to 60 entries Download BULLETIN 1 BARCS INTERGLIDE 2017 F5J Bulletin 1 Final.pdf Forum Topic below
  9. BARCS INTERGLIDE 2017 24th-25th June, Near Ashford, Kent This year’s event will be run by the British Association of Radio Control Soarers. Traditionally an F3J event, to reflect the rise in popularity of electric launch soaring this year we will be run to International F5J rules. The competition is registered as a EUROTOUR and World Cup event and will count towards all relevant National and International Leagues. Location and Dates The site is a large, private airfield located approx. 5miles south of Ashford, Kent allowing easy access from the M20, Eurostar, Ferry Terminals and local Hotels. The Hamilton Farm Airstrip, Bilsington, Ashford Kent, TN25 7JJ. Website for more information: http://www.hamiltonfarmairstrip.co.uk/ Enter online or by form to be found on the Interglide website. https://www.interglide.co.uk Closing Date Friday 16th June. Restricted to 60 entries Download BULLETIN 1 BARCS INTERGLIDE 2017 F5J Bulletin 1 Final.pdf
  10. Hello dear F5J pilot, the Petirrojo RC modelling club invites you to join out 7th edition for F5J Masters (http://www.f5jmasters.com). This year we made a big change in order to offer a more international contest. We will be flying F5J using FAI rules and we expect to make more than 10 qualifying flights and 3 flyoffs. This edition is part of the Eurocontest F5J calendar in Spain. The location is fantastic (Escalona del Prado, Spain), the field is 2kms long and 400m wide with no obstacles. It was used as a flying field during the Spanish Civil War. We offer camp for home motors and camping and a very nice weather in June (25-30º). At the same time we offer a fantastic venue for the pilots and their partners: Segovia. Segovia is 35kms from the field and offer some of the best places to visit in Spain. Segovia has been awarded by UNESCO as one of the World Heritage Cities. The Roman aqueduct of Segovia, probably built c. A.D. 50, is remarkably well preserved. This impressive construction, with its two tiers of arches, forms part of the setting of the magnificent historic city of Segovia. Other important monuments include the Alcázar, begun around the 11th century, and the 16th-century Gothic cathedral. * Aqueduct of Segovia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aqueduct_of_Segovia * Alcazar of Segovia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcázar_of_Segovia Dates: 16th and 17th June 2017 Location: Escalona del Prado, Segovia, Spain (1h15min from Madrid Barajas Airport) Registration: http://www.f5jmasters.com Sponsors: Vinco by Tecnoepoxy, iHobbies, RoiImport, City Council of Escalona del Prado, Hotel el Zaguán. If you have any doubt just contact us at info@f5jmasters.com or via jawarejj @ RCGroups.com.
  11. Hello dear barcs pilot, the Petirrojo RC modelling club invites you to join out 7th edition for F5J Masters (www.f5jmasters.com). This year we made a big change in order to offer a more international contest. We will be flying F5J using FAI rules and we expect to make more than 10 qualifying flights and 3 flyoffs. This edition is part of the Eurocontest F5J calendar in Spain. The location is fantastic (Escalona del Prado, Spain), the field is 2kms long and 400m wide with no obstacles. It was used as a flying field during the Spanish Civil War. We offer camp for home motors and camping and a very nice weather in June (25-30º). At the same time we offer a fantastic venue for the pilots and their partners: Segovia. Segovia is 35kms from the field and offer some of the best places to visit in Spain. Segovia has been awarded by UNESCO as one of the World Heritage Cities. The Roman aqueduct of Segovia, probably built c. A.D. 50, is remarkably well preserved. This impressive construction, with its two tiers of arches, forms part of the setting of the magnificent historic city of Segovia. Other important monuments include the Alcázar, begun around the 11th century, and the 16th-century Gothic cathedral. * Aqueduct of Segovia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aqueduct_of_Segovia * Alcazar of Segovia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcázar_of_Segovia Apologies for the long explanation of Segovia but any pilot knows how important is to have nice places for partners ;-) Dates: 16th and 17th June 2017 Location: Escalona del Prado, Segovia, Spain (1h15min from Madrid Barajas Airport) Registration: www.f5jmasters.com Sponsors: Vinco by Tecnoepoxy, iHobbies, RoiImport, City Council of Escalona del Prado, Hotel el Zaguán. If you have any doubt just contact us at info@f5jmasters.com or here. Thanks.
  12. Growing interest in F5J and the lack of it in F3J results in Interglide being switched to an F5J Eurotour event from 2017 onwards. With the growth of F5J in the UK and Internationally a good entry is on the cards for this event. As soon as there is more information on the event location it will be published here. The date for this event is already decided and will be 24th - 25th June 2017.
  13. Small (3m) but nice looking F5J. 750g ! Simon
  14. Horsham F5J held near Billingshust West Sussex
  15. Most will know of the new development in glider construction which was pioneered by DLG model makers. The difference from what we are used to with moulded construction is that the new method uses one precision cut solid foam core rather than the several layers of thin foam used in the construction of hollow moulded wings. The solid core is covered with the, also new ultra-light carbon fabric, in a mould. There are a number of other differences in the construction but I don’t have all that info. This new construction enables wings to be built with a much thinner section, and much lighter in weight. I must say that when I first read of these developments I had my doubts. How could the weights be achieved, how could they be strong enough for our conditions, how could they be of any use in ‘our’ conditions. I always have to try something new, so when Hyperflight imported a few, I took a chance and bought one of the new Ultima F5J models. All I can say is that the hype about these gliders is true. They are fantastically light and very strong. There is nothing ‘flimsy’ about any part. With some light weight models I have seen, the fuselage is very flexible because of the light cloth and minimal amount of epoxy used. I have a standard Ultima fuselage and it is very rigid made of carbon. The wall thickness is substantial and there is nothing flimsy about it, and it also is very light. There are a number of build threads on the web so I won’t try to compete with those. Only to say that it requires a few different techniques which are more usual to hand launch models. I did take a few pics as I put it together as below Flap Servo Servo Mount and Ballast Tube Cutting nose to length after balancing the model. Servos and ballast tube. Traditional pic before first flight. I have only had 6 flights with it so far, including 4 flights at the Tonbridge F5J comp where the conditions really did not suit it. But I am very pleased with what I have seen so far. Any questions please ask away.
  16. Most will know of the new development in glider construction which was pioneered by DLG model makers. The difference from what we are used to with moulded construction is that the new method uses one precision cut solid foam core rather than the several layers of thin foam used in the construction of hollow moulded wings. The solid core is covered with the, also new ultra-light carbon fabric, in a mould. There are a number of other differences in the construction but I don’t have all that info. This new construction enables wings to be built with a much thinner section, and much lighter in weight. I must say that when I first read of these developments I had my doubts. How could the weights be achieved, how could they be strong enough for our conditions, how could they be of any use in ‘our’ conditions. I always have to try something new, so when Hyperflight imported a few, I took a chance and bought one of the new Ultima F5J models. All I can say is that the hype about these gliders is true. They are fantastically light and very strong. There is nothing ‘flimsy’ about any part. With some light weight models I have seen, the fuselage is very flexible because of the light cloth and minimal amount of epoxy used. I have a standard Ultima fuselage and it is very rigid made of carbon. The wall thickness is substantial and there is nothing flimsy about it, and it also is very light. There are a number of build threads on the web so I won’t try to compete with those. Only to say that it requires a few different techniques which are more usual to hand launch models. I did take a few pics as I put it together as below Flap Servo Servo Mount and Ballast Tube Cutting nose to length after balancing the model. Servos and ballast tube. Traditional pic before first flight. I have only had 6 flights with it so far, including 4 flights at the Tonbridge F5J comp where the conditions really did not suit it. But I am very pleased with what I have seen so far. Any questions please ask away. View full f5j article event or report
  17. Hey everyone! A question most likely for F3x competitors, what type of boxes do you use to get your models on a plane, or what have you seen in use? I've been trying to find something big enough to take a few F3K size planes, but not dramatically expensive neither. I looked at the type of transport box Hyperflight is selling, though it doesn't fill me with confidence as to the strength of one (selling a damaged box at half price now). I thought of adapting one of the Ski plastic boxes that can accommodate up to 4/5 sets of skis, but getting one big enough in UK, not to mention the price, is giving me a headache. I'm not desperate for one yet, but by next year I will. Thanks for help in advance Eryk
  18. RESULTS & REPORT What a cracking days soaring it turned out to be with even the weather cooperating! With an entry of 28 pilots which dropped down to 25 on the day we looked set for a good days soaring. 25 entries ensured that it would still be one of the largest F5J comps held this year in the UK. Very pleasing for us the organizers as it makes all the considerable pre-comp work worthwhile. We are very lucky in that here in the SE corner of the country to have a lot of electric soaring pilots who are happy to support our comps. Over the past 2 years we have tried to steadily improve the organisation and equipment of our F5J comps and this time, if the comments we received were anything to go by, we have succeeded. The latest addition to the field equipment that went down a storm was a High Visibility flightline Countdown Timer that performed flawlessly throughout the day in unison with the automated computer comp running/scoring system. It also indicates what round and slot is about to fly next as well. A newly acquired high powered flightline wireless PA ensured that all pilot announcements were clearly heard on the flightline along with a separate remote PA unit facing towards the pits area from the organizers tent so that those by their cars could also hear announcements. For those that might be interested in building their own countdown timer everything you need to know including sources of the components required can be found at: http://www.gliderscore.com/Audio.aspx?DisplayBuild Onto the competition itself. The weather was overcast for the entire day but enjoyed light winds throughout. The conditions meant that launch height had to be carefully judged to suit the conditions at the time which were variable to say the least. We saw several attempts at very low launches, some of which succeeded but many failed. Such is the nature of F5J. What was obvious looking at the scores is that the pilots ability to judge launch heights had definitely improved overall compared to our last comp. I think this is down to people becoming more familiar with the class plus a bit of practice too! We saw some exceptional flying during the day from various pilots at distances where you could barely see the models. Thermaling/flying models smoothly at these kind of distances is not easy as we all know. The competition moved along at a good pace but one that still allowed for a relaxed days flying. We flew 6 rounds with a 40 minute lunch break finishing up around 5pm. It was great to see some old/new faces at the field with Alan Heber and Tim Lewis from the Isle of Wight taking the ferry over to come and visit for the day. Great to see you guys again after so many years. We look forward to seeing you two flying again rather than spectating! It was also good to see Chris Foss flying well to finish 3rd overall. Well done Chris. My thanks to the Tonbridge members who helped with the organisation. Full results, Round Scores and a selection of pics to convey the atmosphere on the day can be found below. Colin Paddon – Contest CD Tonbridge BMFA F5J League Event - Sunday 18 September 2016 Tonbridge club are hosting a BMFA League F5J competition at Leigh Park Farm, Nr Tonbridge, Kent on Sunday 18 September 2016. We will be running a relaxed and fun competition for both existing competition flyers and new pilots alike. Directions to the field can be found here: https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Leigh+Park+Farm/@51.2091254,0.19327,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x47df4fda3f5fd36d:0xfd76d04136677dd9?hl=en The competition will be run to F5J rules with UK variations as published by the BMFA. Copy of the full rules can be found here: https://bmfa.org/DesktopModules/Bring2mind/DMX/Download.aspx?Command=Core_Download&EntryId=1060&language=en-GB&PortalId=0&TabId=219 The main points for BMFA F5J comps are: - Either Open or 2m may be flown, not both. - Motor restart may be used (results in a zero flight score), and therefore you need only use your eSoaring switch BUT you must reset the (200m) height limit to 300m this can often be done easily by using a reader, otherwise use a computer. - As in eSoaring, you must provide a reader, so that your timekeeper can check your launch height immediately after landing. - Minimum of 4 rounds to be flown. - CD will announce whether or not a Fly-Off will be flown before the start. - Book in from 9am. First flight’s at 10am Entry fee £10.00 (BMFA requirement) payable on the day. Proof of insurance (BMFA membership card is sufficient) required Closing date for entries is 6.00pm Friday 16th September In the event that there is any doubt as to whether the event will be run due to forecasted inclement weather, a final decision will be posted on BARCS and Esoaring websites by no later than 4pm on Saturday 17th September Please enter this event by posting here on this thread: 1) Your name 2) Class being entered - i.e. OPEN or 2 METRE 3) Preferred Frequency if on 35Mhz. 4) BMFA Number Entry list to date: 1. Graham Wicks, Open, 2.4, BMFA 052827 2. Colin Boorman, Open 2.4, BMFA tba 3. Kevin Dart, Open, 2.4, BMFA TBA 4. Colin Paddon, Open, 2.4, BMFA 073473 5. Mike Connell, Open. 2.4, BMFA 155649 6. Chris Foss, Open, 2.4, BMFA 7. Ricky Shaw 2.4 Open BMFA TBA 8. Phil Ramsey 2.4 Open BMFA TBA 9. Rod Potts, Open, 2.4, BMFA 002875 10. Keith Fisher, Open, 2.4, BMFA 060851 11. Simon Smith, OPen, 2.4, BMFA TBA 12. Bob Hope Open, 2.4. BMFA TBA 13. Alan Twine Open, 2.4, BMFA67979 14. Peter Mitchell, Open, 2.4 BMFA33859 15. Nick Jackson Open 2.4GHz BMFA 123273 16. Eddy Small Open 2.4GHz BMFA 063558 17. Ian Nicholls, OPEN 2.4GHz BMFA 39293 18. Terry Stuckey, Open, 2.4, BMFA TBA 19. Colin Lucas, Open, 2.4, BMFA TBA 20. Steve Knowles OPEN 2.4 GHz BMFA 70799 21. Ian duff, open, 2.4ghz, BMFA 018894 22. Peter Ley. Open, 2.4, BMFA 187230 23. Simon Conran: Open 2.4 BMFA. 195226 24. Ray Gadenne Open 2.4 052822 25. Tony Merritt 2M BMFA 142327 26. John Hovell, Open, 2.4, BMFA No.040572 Round-Scores.zip Height-Landing- Draw Results.zip
  19. f5j

    This is my first stab at a full function TS glider. Once again, Jef is the nudge behind the design and once again I am seeking comments and help etc on the layout and construction and in particular the power train. I have used Sailplane Calc extensively with this model, Profili for the wing design and Draftsight to pull it all together. There is no rush, this is going to be a winter build and I have a F3-RES to build first. So v2 is here - still some tweaking to do. Some salient details based on a target AUW of 1500g (whether that target is achievable is debatable - I have a feeling that 1800g AUW will be a more realistic target) Total Span 3720.00mm Total Area 84.60dm2 Wing Loading 17.73gr/dm2 Mean Chord (area/span )227.42mm Mean Aerodynamic Chord (length) 231.32mm Wing Aspect Ratio16.36 Effective Wing Results (Projected) Total Span 3734.31mm Total Area 83.95dm2 Mean Chord (area/span) 227.86mm Wing Loading 17.87gr/dm2 Aspect Ratio 16.17 Wing section is an RG-15 and tail HT-21 Flaps on the inner panel and ailerons on the middle panels. How these get engineered I have yet to decide. Wing will be constructed with C/F caps over solid balsa web/spars. I am also going to use a strip C/F TE as well. The LE D box will (possibly) be skinned with 0.2mm proskin (Jury is still out on this) and C/F cap strips over the wing ribs 6 panel polyhedral wing. My very limited experience with Aileron Thermal Soarer Glider wings is that the models seem to use Ailerons for roll control rather than steering, but then again that could be the wings that I saw. EDA is therefore at the bottom end of Mark Drelas design guide at 6.13 degrees Sailplane Calc threw out these numbers: Any thoughts would be very welcome Thanks White_Rabbit-v2.pdf
  20. Tonbridge BMFA F5J League Event - Sunday 19 June 2016 – THE RESULTS Tonbridge club are hosting a F5J competition at Leigh Park Farm, Nr Tonbridge, Kent on Sunday 19 June 2016. We will be running a relaxed and fun competition for both existing competition flyers and new pilots alike. YOU DO NOT HAVE TO BE A BMFA MEMBER TO ENTER BUT MUST BE ABLE TO PROOVE YOU HAVE INSURANCE Directions to the field can be found here: https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Leigh+Park+Farm/@51.2091254,0.19327,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x47df4fda3f5fd36d:0xfd76d04136677dd9?hl=en The competition will be run to F5J rules with UK variations as published by the BMFA. Copy of the full rules can be found here: https://bmfa.org/DesktopModules/Bring2mind/DMX/Download.aspx?Command=Core_Download&EntryId=1060&language=en-GB&PortalId=0&TabId=219 The main points for BMFA F5J comps are: - Either Open or 2m may be flown, not both. - Motor restart may be used (results in a zero flight score), and therefore you need only use your eSoaring switch BUT you must reset the (200m) height limit to 300m this can often be done easily by using a reader, otherwise use a computer. - As in eSoaring, you must provide a reader, so that your timekeeper can check your launch height immediately after landing. - Minimum of 4 rounds to be flown. - CD will announce whether or not a Fly-Off will be flown before the start. - Book in from 9am. First flight’s at 10am Entry fee £10.00 (BMFA requirement) payable on the day. Proof of BMFA membership (card is sufficient) required Closing date for entries is 6.00pm Friday 17th June In the event that there is any doubt as to whether the event will be run due to forecasted inclement weather, a final decision will be posted on BARCS and Esoaring websites by no later than 4pm on Saturday 18th June Please enter this event by preferably posting on this thread or emailing wixy3@hotmail.com 1) Your name 2) Class being entered - i.e. OPEN or 2 METRE 3) Preferred Frequency if on 35Mhz. 4) BMFA Number Entry list to date: 1. Graham Wicks, Open, 2.4, BMFA 052827 2. Colin Boorman, Open 2.4, BMFA tba 3. Kevin Beale, Open, 2.4, BMFA 040788 4. Colin Paddon, Open, 2.4, BMFA 073473 5. Tony Merrit, 2M, 2.4, BMFA TBA 6. Brian Austin, 2.4, Open, BMFA 057851 7. Chris Foss 2.4 Open BMFA TBA 8. Phil Ramsey 2.4 Open BMFA TBA 9. Ricky Shaw 2.4 Open BMFA TBA 10. Pete Mitchell, Open, 2.4, BMFA TBA 11. Rod Potts, Open, 2.4, BMFA 002875 12. Peter Ley, Open, 2.4. BMFA 187230 13. Keith Fisher, Open, 2.4, BMFA 060851 14. Steve Crowther Open 2.4 BMFA 101758 15. Randy Taylor, Open, 2.4, BMFA 165603 16. Tony Wood, Open, 2.4, 055919 17. Nick Jackson, Open, 2.4, 123273 18. Eddy Small, Open, 2.4, 063558 19. Ian Nicholls, Open, 2.4, 39293 20. Alan Twine, Open, 2.4, 667979 21. Mike Connell, Open, 2.4, 155649 22. Richard Harris, Open, 2.4 BMFA TBA 23. Jeff Ott, Open, 2.4 BMFA 21361 24. Gary Matthews, Open, 2.4, BMFA 032611 25. John Hovell, Open, 2.4, BMFA No.040572 26. Terry Stuckey, Open, 2.4, BMFA TBA 27. Peter Allen, Open, 2.4, BMFA No TBA 28. Cliff Stone, Open, 2.4, BMFA TBA
  21. Tonbridge BMFA F5J League Event - Sunday 19 June 2016 – THE RESULTS With an entry of 27 pilots, Tonbridge club hosted what we believe to be the largest UK domestic F5J league comp to date. Following a week of torrential rainfall we were glad to find that with care getting onto the field and not getting stuck wasn’t a problem other than Phil Ramsey who unfortunately got stuck with his large heavy motor-home. Farmer to the rescue with very big red tractor! The day looked like it would be ideal RC Soaring weather starting off warm and calm but progressively getting windier as the day wore on. The first slot which enjoyed wall to wall lift gave no clue as to what was to turn out to be extremely challenging days flying with several slots not being flown out by a large margin. When the sink came through it was what can only be described as massive blanket sink which covered unusually large expanses of sky. This coupled to the strengthening wind resulted in many missed landings and land outs. We managed to complete 5 rounds with a break for lunch making for a nice relaxed comp. With storm clouds forming after 5 rounds were completed the general consensus was to stop at that point as no-one fancied getting stuck on the field if the rain reached us. It was good to see some “new” old faces competing in F5J for the first time with Ricky Shaw and Chris Foss attending. Special mention must be made of Ricky Shaw who flew excellently in his first ever F5J comp to secure second place overall. Despite this being Rick’s first F5J comp his launch height management and skilful flying really made its mark. We hope to see him and his team mates at more F5J comps in the future. Thanks to the Tonbridge members who helped with the organisation and also to all the pilots who supported this comp, it makes the organisation/work involved worthwhile. We will post some pics of the day soon. The full results can be found below:
  22. A full report on the Tonbridge BMFA F5J League event 2016 is in the F5J section here. Click on the link below for the forum discussion.
  23. Short reminder, there is still time to enter the F5J UK International at Ashurst first weekend in July entries close 24th June 2016 To date 52 entries from 7 countries which includes 6 Juniors, max entries will be capped at 60 2 day competition event with flying and camping over 4 days Lunch and refreshment provided Saturday and Sunday and a BBQ on the Saturday night you must have insurance and will need an FAI licence to enter Further details can be found here and entry forms www.f5juk.eu
  24. Once again it is my pleasure to collate a report for this year’s Radioglide event. Held at the now familiar Tudor Farm near the village of Edgcott in Buckinghamshire, the winch launch competitions were held in a new field adjacent to the previously used one as this has been ploughed and planted with crop. The weather stayed dry for all three days, a touch windy at times (some might say more than a touch!) and a great time was had by all. Please find the individual discipline reports below, I hope there are no glaring errors but it is difficult sometimes as a competing pilot to take in all that is going on. Saturday 28th May F5J – Gary Binnie Colin Boorman. Radioglide F5J winner 2016 The day dawned fine with a hazy blue sky initially, cumulus developed in the early afternoon with a North Easterly wind up to 12 mph but it was quite calm at times, probably due to thermal influence. It was fairly chilly in the morning requiring light jackets to be worn but warmed up to 19°C later. The air in early rounds featured weak lift with the best pilots making the most of it and flying the slots out. Pilots flew together in groups of four or five with seven rounds flown with a dropped score applied. Timing and spotting in F5J is a responsible job and you can often be paired up with a pilot that you’ve never worked with before. A lighter moment for me was during a launch with Al Lipscombe, he became unbalanced somehow and launched the model awkwardly and in a downward direction instead of nose up. I heard a faint click which was his right hand coming down to the transmitter to accidentally turn the motor switch off with the model now climbing! The model landed about 50 metres upwind and we walked over to record the flight, time was 11.8 seconds (I couldn’t bring myself to round it up to 12!) with a launch height of six metres. We handed the score card in which bagged him a mighty 13 points, this was handily voided with the drop score applied and we all had a chuckle. Peter Allen launches his Tragi with Ian Duff on the watches (Photo Graham James) Everybody has their own preference for motor switch position, my own method is to use a latching switch on the left back of the transmitter which operates towards me during motor run with my finger holding it in the on position just in case. A useful break was taken every couple of rounds to enter the scores with a longer lunch break. The local red kites showed the way as usual, I joined a circling seagull once, I don’t usually trust them but it was going up! Final positions were Colin Boorman winning, Dave East as runner-up with Graham Wicks in third place. F5J Results Rank Name Score Pcnt Raw Score Rnd1 Rnd2 Rnd3 Rnd4 Rnd5 Rnd6 Rnd7 Drop1 1 BOORMAN, Colin 5904.4 100 6676.7 959.2 1000 975.8 992.2 1000 977.2 772.3 772.3 2 EAST, Dave 5874 99.49 6409.8 995.7 960.7 1000 935.8 535.8 1000 981.8 535.8 3 WICKS, Graham 5844.5 98.99 6757.5 940.1 1000 956.9 990.4 971.9 985.2 913 913 4 DUFF, Ian 5827.6 98.7 6196.9 961.6 913.6 369.3 1000 1000 1000 952.4 369.3 5 ALLEN, Peter 5774.5 97.8 6283.2 508.7 994.6 1000 906.6 1000 873.3 1000 508.7 6 RAYBONE, Mike 5343.1 90.49 5690.8 1000 996.4 621.6 921.2 347.7 803.9 1000 347.7 7 AUSTIN, Brian 5139.7 87.05 5448.9 1000 309.2 1000 959.1 521.2 739.1 920.3 309.2 8 BEALE, Kevin 5104.7 86.46 5118.9 423.3 999.1 747.2 1000 935.9 999.2 14.2 14.2 9 PADDON, Colin 5076.2 85.97 5502.9 426.7 954.6 601.8 1000 891.1 976.5 652.2 426.7 10 GADENE, Ray 5054.9 85.61 5496.9 442 966 632.9 967.8 627.9 1000 860.3 442 11 BINNIE, Gary 4983.1 84.4 5345.4 530.6 949.5 918.3 741.3 922.9 362.3 920.5 362.3 12 DICKENSON, Bob 4973.3 84.23 4973.3 1000 1000 498.5 998.3 0.0001 476.5 1000 0 13 LIPSCOMBE, Al 4059.4 68.75 4073.3 13.9 372.6 690.8 736 945.2 906.3 408.5 13.9 14 PHILCOX, Cengiz 4007.2 67.87 4007.2 830.2 0.0001 530.5 886.3 970.9 789.3 0 0 100S – Graham James Kevin & Peter Newitt. Radioglide 100s Joint winners 2016 (Photo Alan Morton) The 100s competition was flown concurrently with the F5J in the adjacent field, Alan Morton was invited to CD. We had 13 entries in pre-allocated teams, on the day only 12 turned up so Alan juggled them around to give us four teams of three and flying started around 10.40am. Five rounds and two fly-offs were matrixed. The warm air and gentle breeze created some good workable lift throughout the day and all but one of the 15 slots flown during the first five rounds were flown out. Up until round three all models apart from one out of field had landed inside the landing zone, during the 3rd round. John Hullet misjudged and landed out and Neville Warby making his final turn, was grabbed by an innocent looking tree! It was later recovered by the farmer’s cherry picker with no damage. During the rest of the first five rounds we had excellent flight times including one from Dave Leech at 7.54 he came off the line early but still managed to fly out the slot. After a very enjoyable five rounds the top four pilots entered the fly-off, Kevin Newitt, Fozzy Devall, Peter Newitt and Graham James. Nesting Tracker (Photo Graham James) All pilots launched and were soon into decent air; Graham lost out and had to settle for 6.45 while the others continued to fly the slot out. Following a misunderstanding in the second fly off, in which a model was relaunched when it shouldn’t, there was an unfortunate mid-air which resulted in Peter Newitt having to land prematurely. It was apparent that but for this he was likely to have taken a clean win of the event, so in the spirit of good sportsmanship it was decided to award Peter and Kevin Newitt joint winners. The day ended with everyone in high spirits after what was an excellent day's flying, it was good to see pilots still enjoying a good old fashioned 100s competition. Results Rounds Pilot Name Rnd 1 Rnd 2 Rnd 3 Rnd 4 Rnd 5 Final Score %Score Position Kevin Newitt 1000 1000 1000 1000 998 4998 100.00 1 Fozzy DeVall 1000 996 1000 1000 1000 4996 99.96 2 13. Peter Newitt 1000 1000 861 1000 1000 4861 97.26 3 Graham James 970 967 955 976 988 4856 97.16 4 8. Alan Morton 1000 1000 628 1000 1000 4628 92.60 5 David Leech 647 696 984 961 1000 4288 85.79 6 Robin Sleight 467 850 1000 704 988 4009 80.21 7 Neville Warby 998 752 0 988 1000 3738 74.79 8 Ken Goddard 776 998 996 478 435 3683 73.69 9 John Hullet 994 688 512 515 900 3609 72.21 10 John Shenstone 915 996 675 0 0 2586 51.74 11 Dave Fogg 0 657 0 0 0 657 13.15 12 Final Positions 1st 13. Peter Newitt 1997 100.0 1st 11. Kevin Newitt 1997 100.0 3rd 4. Fozzy DeVall 1652 82.7 4th 5. Graham James 1057 52.9 Thanks to Alan for running the competition and all the regular 100s pilots who assist in laying out the field and in particular the inimitable Neville Warby. Sunday 29th May Multi-launch – Graham James Multilaunch Fly-Off Pilots (Photo Graham James) Sunday’s weather was a bit of a disappointment by comparison, overcast with a chilly North Easterly breeze turning to broken cumulus later in the afternoon. Five preliminary rounds were flown plus two fly-off rounds. There was a fairly even split of winch and electric launch gliders and one DLG flown by Mike Fantham. The ‘sailboat start’ meaning that all flights are timed from the start of the slot (or end of the individuals launch phase) and electrics set to 175 metres leads to a very level playing field and some long flight times the best of which being a 9.59 by Al Lipscombe. This parity was further borne out in that the four pilots in the fly-off used a 50/50 mix of winch launch and electric gliders. Good air in the first fly off slot saw flight times of 14.53 for Peter Allen (Electric) and 14.46 for Kevin Beale (Winch). In the second round, with the lift not so good Peter and different winch launcher, Colin Boorman produced times of 11.25 and 11.07 respectively. But in the end it was Peter Allen (Electric) who proved triumphant followed by Kevin Beale (Winch), Colin Boorman (Winch) and Colin Paddon (Electric). As well as the presentation of the FACCT Trophy to the overall winner, prizes were given for Best Winch, Electric and Hand Launch competitors. We were delighted to be visited by the legendary Geoff Dallimer, BARCS No. 1, who showed a keen interest in the model development over the years since his days of designing models such as the Zephyr 100s design featured in RCM&E. Multi-launch Fly-Off Results Rank Name Score Pcnt Raw Score Rnd1 Rnd2 1 ALLEN, Peter 1964.4 100 1964.4 964.4 1000 2 BEALE, Kevin 1934.7 98.49 1934.7 1000 934.7 3 BOORMAN, Colin 1728.2 87.98 1728.2 752.7 975.5 4 PADDON, Colin 1544.3 78.61 1544.3 606.9 937.4 DLG Pilot's Perspective of Multi-launch – Mike Fantham I entered Multi-launch partly out of curiosity and partly because I had helped Jef Ott to prepare a rule change proposal aimed at getting more hand launch pilots out to ML events - so I thought I'd better try one! The first thing I noticed was that I was quickest into the air on arrival at the field. The model was fully assembled in the car when I arrived and I just had to step out onto the field and throw. That was to be the only advantage I had because the weather seemed a bit breezy for hand launch to be the best option for me to win the event. Chas Dunster kindly volunteered to time for me and he wasn't flying himself so I had a dedicated helper. I soon got into the swing of things except the 'finding good air' part. The hand launch flyer gets four flights added together to make up the slot score and a two second bonus for each re-launch. I hoped to 'get away' on one of these and fly out the slot each time. However, from a 35 metre launch in the breezy conditions, I only really got any help on a couple of flights all day, making about four minutes each time. It was a bit galling seeing the others making 200 metres and having plenty of range and time to find air. In the end, I was pleased to see that I was 12th out of the 14 at the end of the day and I took home a bottle of wine as the best (only!) Hand launch entrant. I need to practice my spot landings. I can easily catch the model on most flights normally but I can also easily change my position to meet the model! When you have to stand still and land at your feet, it gets much harder! The best part was meeting and flying with some of the 'names' from the 'big glider world' - nice bunch of chaps and I was made welcome and to really feel part of the event. The top Hand launch pilots, launching almost twice as high as I can would be competitive in this class. I was 7th of the 8 the next day in Hand launch.... Come and try F3K flyers. Monday 30th May F3K – Mike Fantham We had a low entry of eight - one original entrant had to drop out because a long struggle to finish his model had not worked out. He still came out to help and time on the Monday which was very welcome! We were pleased to see Liam Hawes out again and to welcome Jason Bioletti at his first F3K event - he retired early but said had a good time and that he'd be back. The forecast had been dire all the previous week and I had posted a warning of cancellation the BARCS forum on the Saturday promising a decision by midday Sunday. On Sunday morning, I was busy with the MLG contest but checking the weather as well. Rain looked unlikely and the wind was high but below the limit so I decided to go ahead with F3K - we had the minimum eight required for a league-counting event and would need four rounds for the score to count. Monday morning saw me on the field at 08:45 choosing a site for the launch and landing 'box'. It was fairly near the chicken farm edge of the field to try to keep the F3J field downwind, ensuring a 'friendly' area for any land-outs. In the event nobody dared stray that far downwind. The wind was strong but it was flyable and I could range upwind on my test flights - helped by 84 grams of ballast in my already-heavy 'Bonus' – a 400 gm total weight! I had some problems with the sound gear but we got going soon after 10:00 with an initial aim of completing four rounds. Pilots soon found that there was 'help' over the edge of the field - possibly slope lift from the trees/hedge. Michael Stern only dropped 20 seconds in the 5x2 in round 1. He would hope to drop around five seconds in perfect weather so it was an excellent score in the rough conditions. There was turbulence of course but we coped and I wasn't aware of too much in the way of damage. After three successful rounds, I had decided to go to five rounds before lunch and before I did any scoring because a fifth round means that there's one dropped round score available to pilots. The usual suspects were building a lead and Richard Swindells was ahead at lunch with Michael Stern second and Simon Barker third. Conditions still seemed pretty much the same so we decided to press on after lunch and see what happened. I started the sixth round and it soon became apparent that conditions had become more turbulent and the wind had increased. I saw some flights upset badly and only some fast –reaction piloting got them safely back on the ground - usually 'in the box'. After slot two of that round, I called it a day. Nobody complained! As to models, the top four all used a Stream NXT for at least some of their flights. The trend continues to solid core moulded wings and lighter models with lower wing areas. Full slot-by-slot results are available in the F3K and Hand launch section of the BARCS forum. 1. Richards Swindells 4994 2. Michael Stern 4905 3. Simon Barker 4599 4. Liam Hawes 4347 5. Alex Holswilder 4330 6. Lorry Green 3142 7. Mike Fantham 2661 8. Jason Bioletti 1404 F3J – Gary Binnie/Graham James Neil Jones. Radioglide F3J winner 2016 More overcast still than the first couple of days and a stronger NNE wind requiring thicker jackets than Saturday (motorcycle jacket for me!). The forecast was to be dry all day which it was but moisture could be felt in the air but not seen. With the strong wind most pilots used the technique of hanging into wind and ‘bouncing’ any lift with the occasional circle. Conditions improved and more and more people were venturing further afield. I noticed from the lunch break scores that I was doing quite well and decided to ‘go for it’ in the next round by circling off merrily down wind, unfortunately my plan failed with my trusty Xplorer not quite making it back to the field against the headwind, c’est la vie! Landing itself quite neatly in the next field I have at last broken my duck of landing ‘au vache’ and plan to risk it more in future. Kevin Beale with Spotter Colin Boormann The familiar Xplorers, Maxas and Tragi's dominated the models used but Pike Perfects, Shadows and Xperience Pros were also in evidence and still very competitive. Also on show were a couple of the new Optimus machines which look very good and are likely to prove popular in the future. Five rounds were flown followed by two fly-off rounds, all under the familiar, watchful eye of BARCS President, Sydney Lenssen. The preliminary rounds saw the top four pilots going onto the fly offs. Appropriately, Neil Jones with a maximum 5000, Kevin Beale and Mark Devall, who comprise the UK Team for the forthcoming World Championships, all made it through along with Colin Paddon who is a helper on the team. Neil didn’t have it all his own way, with Kevin winning the first slot but by only 6.3pts. In fly-off two however, the roles were reversed and Neil came out on top overall. And so to prize giving. Neil Jones took the Humbrol Trophy for F3J. Additional Radioglide prizes also went to Colin Boorman for the highest place competitor over the whole three Days (Victor Ludorum) and to Jason Bioletti as the Best Newcomer (Lillienthal Trophy). F3J Fly-Off Results Rank Name Score Pcnt Raw Score Rnd1 Rnd2 1 JONES, Neil 1993.7 100 1993.7 993.7 1000 2 BEALE, Kevin 1786.9 89.63 1786.9 1000 786.9 3 PADDON, Colin 1522.4 76.36 1522.4 848 674.4 4 DEVALL, Mark 1515.7 76.02 1515.7 979.5 536.2 Rounds Rank Name Score Pcnt Raw Score Rnd1 Rnd2 Rnd3 Rnd4 Rnd5 1 JONES, Neil 5000 100 5000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 2 BEALE, Kevin 4457.1 89.14 4457.1 1000 782.6 1000 674.5 1000 3 DEVALL, Mark 4432.6 88.65 4432.6 780.3 1000 975.2 1000 677.1 4 PADDON, Colin 4415.2 88.3 4415.2 968.5 498.6 948.1 1000 1000 5 PHILCOX, Cengiz 4411.2 88.22 4411.2 991.2 798.9 905 1000 716.1 6 DUFF, Ian 4260.1 85.2 4260.1 1000 688.7 717.5 862.2 991.7 7 OSBOURNE, Ozzie 4168 83.36 4168 864.8 821.5 892.4 796.3 793 8 DICKENSON, Bob 4034.5 80.69 4034.5 850.5 690.4 652.4 993.2 848 9 BOORMAN, Colin 3961.1 79.22 3961.1 942.4 810.1 582.6 822.6 803.4 10 BINNIE, Gary 3719.9 74.4 3719.9 785.1 1000 934.8 0 1000 11 JAMES, Graham 3560.3 71.21 3560.3 888.2 657.2 694 920.7 400.2 12 SHENSTONE, John 3542.9 70.86 3542.9 730.5 972.7 511.9 489.4 838.4 13 DUNSTER, Chas 3517.1 70.34 3517.1 483.7 1000 694.1 788.2 551.1 14 EAST, Dave 3305.3 66.11 3305.3 1000 938.5 632 0 734.8 15 ALLEN, Peter 2990.9 59.82 2990.9 998.5 992.4 1000 0 0 16 RAYBONE, Mike 2676.1 53.52 2676.1 861.8 814.3 1000 0 0 17 LIPSCOMBE, Al 2449.4 48.99 2449.4 666.1 643.2 0 692.8 447.3 18 SLEIGHT, Robin 661.7 13.23 661.7 661.7 0 0 0 0 "Uncle" Sydney Lenssen Congratulations to all Winners in the four events over the weekend. We hope everyone enjoyed themselves. Many thanks go to all the CD’s for running the event and to the organisational team behind the whole weekend. Long may Radioglide continue.
  25. Without a suitable field being available to hold an event with all SF classes being represented in one place, this year the SF Nats competitions will be held at various locations. 4 classes will be hosted at Wetlands over August Bank Holiday weekend 27th - 29th August Saturday – F5J; Sunday – F3J & 2M eSoaring; Monday – Open eSoaring Camping on site will be available. (Note - dogs are not allowed at Wetlands) Entry to these events and camping reservation, will be by website topics (BARCS & eSoaring), from mid July, with payment being made at the first competition attended. 100S will be held at Twywell on Sept 4th – look for website announcements. F5B League event on July 16/17, will also count for the Nats trophy. F3B League event on July 30/31, will also count for the Nats trophy. F3K will be announced later. Links to the forum entry topics will appear here shortly. Mike Proctor