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  1. CANCELLED Kent Interclub Glider 4 - Multi-launch competition 3rd October 2021 Posted on behalf of the CD Bob Ryan who based on the weather forecasts and feedback has decided to cancel. A new Topic will be started for any new date You are invited to Kent Interclub Glider 4 Multi-launch competition to be held 3rd October 2021, CD on the day is Bob Ryan. This is an open competition and non-Kent Interclub club members are very welcome (entry fee £5). For KIC flyers only – note that this competition will also use the scoring for the 2021 Kent Cup for which all rounds flown will count. We want to have a full day's flying so please check in 09:30 latest and be ready for Pilots Briefing at 09:45 with the competition starting at 10:00 sharp. To enter, please click on Reply to this topic no later than 6pm Friday 1st October with model class, and frequency if not 2.4 (Glider, Electric, Open, 100" etc) so a matrix can be set up. A final decision to confirm or cancel depending on the weather will be posted here by 12 noon on Saturday 2nd October. (Please note that entrants need to check here and will not be emailed about cancellation.) Important Covid Advice: Do not attend this competition if you are showing any Covid symptoms or have experienced them in the last 14 days Competition will be paperless using eScoring Gliderscore smart phone app. Your scorecard with be given to you on check in. Ensure you follow latest Gov.uk guidelines in respect to washing hands, touching face and hand hygiene. Location & Directions The field can be as follows. Leaving the M2, follow A289 towards Medway tunnel and then follow signs for B2000 towards Cliffe. Follow B2000 right through Cliffe village until road narrows and then right into Reed Street which then becomes Common Lane. Field is down track on corner of Common lane/ Rye street The nearest postcode is ME3 7UD Using What3Words (phone app) with location “fewest.timer.sketching” See attached images for field location Additional Info: The rules are BARCS Multi-launch , Electric launch gliders must be fitted with an AMRT (height limiter) which cuts the motor at 30 secs and records the launch height. Electric launch height remains at 175m with a penalty of 3 pts per metre for Electric launches exceeding it. Most pilots will want to set AMRTs to cut a little below 175m. It is fine instead to use F5J firmware and cut the motor manually. A minimum of 4 rounds and a maximum of 6 rounds will be flown weather permitting Enter by replying to this topic
  2. Full details and entry will be on the BARCS – Aircraft - Kent Interclub Forum This is an open competition and non Kent club members are very welcome (entry fee £5). The rules are BARCS Multilaunch for Electric launch gliders. Electric Gliders must be fitted with an AMRT (height limiter) which cuts the motor at 30 secs and records the launch height. Electric launch height of 175m with a penalty of 3 pts per metre for Electric launches exceeding it. Most pilots will want to set AMRTs to cut a little below 175m. It is fine instead to use F5J.
  3. Saturday 25th 8th Northern F5J Wetlands (reserve Sunday 26th) Final decision re cancellation or reserve by email, Friday 16|:00 Additional Details Address - WETLANDS, Sutton Grange Farm Postcode - DN22 8SB County - Nоttіnghаmѕhіrе Contact - Alex Maxfield Contact - Tel 07809 846931 Contact - Email - AlexMaxfield@hotmail.co.uk
  4. Saturday 11th 7th Northern F5J Wetlands (reserve Sunday 12th) Final decision re cancellation or reserve by email, Friday 16|:00 Additional Details Address - WETLANDS, Sutton Grange Farm Postcode - DN22 8SB County - Nоttіnghаmѕhіrе Contact - Alex Maxfield Contact - Tel 07809 846931 Contact - Email - AlexMaxfield@hotmail.co.uk
  5. This is an early announcement in the hope we can receive more detailed history and any reports from past years from our readers in advance of this years event. The history of the above starts with HAROLD JAMES TOWNER (1893 to ????) engineer. H J Towner was the elder brother of professional artist Donald Towner. They are descended from the Eastbourne (Sussex) branch of the Towner family. He is noted for his particular expertise in the art of scale modelling classic aircraft built to fly. He also possessed considerable skill as a draughtsman. His designs for model aircraft were published in the 1940s and are still much admired and sought after today. Following his death his own high quality scale models (made from his own plans) were acquired by the Royal Air Force museum. Mr Towner still retains a strong following amongst the model aircraft fraternity and the Towner Memorial Trophy is presented to the best entry in (model thermal gliding) competitions. Some of the things said about him (from blog websites) are : - “exquisite drawings” “highly respected and skilful” “he could make almost anything fly” “lifetime of model building admired by many even today” The image is of his publication “Scale model aircraft that fly” (1940) by H J Towner and Howard Boys. The actual Towner Trophy was presented by the family to the South Eastern Area of the SMAE (now known as the BMFA) and was traditionally was held in Eastbourne at Deanland Airfield. Mr Towners daughter Pam Urquhart used to present the trophy. Norman Cooling from the Eastbourne Flying Club ran the competition and after he passed away Keith Miller from the Tonbridge club and now the Kent Interclub are running of the event. The first competition was held in 1968 to early thermal gliding rules and is believed to be the oldest event for Thermal Soaring. 54 years on and the rules have changed firstly to F3J then Multilaunch and finally F5J. It has been held on 47 occasions some years missed for various reasons including bad weather, foot and mouth restrictions and similarly last year COVID. There have only been 29 winners during this time with the all time honours going to Chris Foss with 7 wins, Ricky Shaw and Colin Paddon with 5, Colin Lucas with 3, Geoff Dallimer and Phil Ramsey twice. Entry details will follow nearer the event.
  6. Kent Interclub Glider 3 Multi-launch competition 18 July The competition is on. Scoring arrangements. Everyone's scores will need to be inputted by phone AND recorded on paper (on your score record, to be left at the control tent at the end of the competition, after your last flown round.) Phone To get to the page to input your scores has been sent by email to you. If it's not in your Inbox check your Junk folder, (Good idea to go to your page in advance and bookmark it. Or you can scan the QR code on your score record if preferred. Any hassles, just ask. No problem for someone else to input your score for you if necessary. Feel free to try it out in advance - scores will be reset to zero before the comp.) Score record I'll bring along the printed score record sheets for everyone tomorrow - no need to print yours out (but attached in case anyone wants to). Must be filled in by the pilot, please, and left at the control tent at the end of the competition. Enjoy your day flying. Important Covid Advice: Do not attend this competition if you are showing any Covid symptoms or have experienced them in the last 14 days. The most important symptoms of Covid are the recent onset of the following: A new continuous cough, a high temperature, a loss of, or change in, your normal sense of taste or small. Competition will be paperless using Gliderscore smart phone app. Bring gloves and sanitiser to the event in case gates need to be opened/shut. Do not touch landing tapes, use feet to move tapes relative to front of model after landing. Strictly observe the 2m distancing rule. Ensure you follow latest Gov.uk guidelines in respect to washing hands, touching face and hand hygiene. For and on behalf of Bob Hope CD Summary: · You are invited to Kent Interclub Glider 3 Multi-launch competition to be held 18 July 2020, CD on the day is Bob Hope (GliderScore Ian Nicholls). This is an open competition and non-Kent Interclub club members are very welcome (entry fee £5). · We want to have a full day's flying so please check in 09:30 latest and be ready for Pilots Briefing at 09:45 with the competition starting at 10:00 sharp. · To enter, please click on Reply to this topic no later than 6pm Friday 16 July with model class, and frequency if not 2.4 (Glider, Electric, Open, 100" etc) so a matrix can be set up. · A final decision to confirm or cancel depending on the weather will be posted here by 6pm Friday 16 July. (Please note that entrants need to check here and will not be emailed about cancellation.) Location: · Tonbridge club field is at Leigh Park Farm. The postcode is TN11 8PN. Additional Info: · The rules are a variant of BARCS Multi-launch but, for Electric launch gliders, the variant is slightly different from last year. As before, Electric launch gliders must be fitted with an AMRT (height limiter) which cuts the motor at 30 secs and records the launch height. Electric launch height remains at 175m but there will now be a penalty of 3 pts per metre for Electric launches exceeding it. Most pilots will want to set AMRTs to cut a little below 175m. It is fine instead to use F5J firmware and cut the motor manually. · A minimum of 4 rounds and a maximum of 6 rounds will be flown Disciplines: · Glider, Electric, Open, 100" ENTRANTS Bloobirds Ian Nicholls Winch Greg Hayfield Winch Iain Stingemore Winch Mike Connell Electric Bromley Alan Twine Electric Bob Ryan Electric Pete Mitchell Electric Canterbury Eddy Small Electric SADMAC John Postle Electric Alan Harris Electric Terry Letchford Electric Brian Martin 100" Electric Invicta Richard Harris Electric Keith Fisher Electric Rob Love Electric Tonbridge Graham Wicks Electric Bob Hope Electric Colin Paddon Electric Derek Potter Electric Guests Garry Matthews Electric Brian Austin Electric Steve Knowles Electric
  7. Regretfully cancelled due circumstances beyond our control. Full details and entry will be on the BARCS F5J Forum Scores count to BARCS & Bartletts F5J League. Entry £5.00 payable on the day
  8. Event cancelled - Unfortunately the first crop of grass will not have been cut before this date. The next Bartletts event will be as previously published on August 15 You are invited to Bartletts F5J League Round 2 to be held 4 July 2021, CD Ian Nicholls. This is an open competition and qualifies for BARCS League Entry fee £5 payable on the day. We want to have a full day's flying so please check in 09:30 and be ready for Pilots Briefing at 09:45 with the competition starting at 10:00. There will be a half hour lunch break. To enter, please click on Reply to this topic no later than 6pm Friday 2 July with your name, BMFA number, model class (if not Open), and frequency (if not 2.4 ) so a matrix can be set up. A final decision to confirm or cancel depending on the weather will be posted here by noon Saturday 3 July. Location: Bartletts Farm at Rettendon, Essex. Important Covid Advice Do not attend this competition if you are showing any Covid symptoms or have experienced them in the last 14 days. Competition will be paperless using Gliderscore smart phone app. Score records will be issued on the day and must be placed in the Score Record Box at the end of the competition. Bring gloves and sanitiser to the event in case gates need to be opened/shut Do not touch landing tapes, use feet to move tapes relative to front of model after landing Strictly observe the 2m distancing rule. Ensure you follow latest Gov.uk guidelines in respect to washing hands, touching face and hand hygiene. ENTRIES Ian Nicholls BMFA 39293 Steve Knowles BMFA 70799 Eddy Small BMFA 063558 Brian Austin BMFA 057851 Garry Matthews BMFA 32611 Pete Mitchell BMFA 33859 Nick Jackson BMFA 123273 Tony Merritt BMFA 142327
  9. Bromley 2011 - Contest Reports - British Association of Radio Control Soarers (barcs.co.uk) and Kent InterClub Multilaunch - 20 June 2021 at Invicta The latter was only attended by Kent flyers, sadly many from the former are no longer with us, but the opportunity to fly your F3J models in competitions still exists.
  10. Full details and entry will be on the BARCS – Aircraft - Kent Interclub Forum This is an open competition and non Kent club members are very welcome (entry fee £5). The rules are BARCS Multilaunch for Electric launch gliders. Electric Gliders must be fitted with an AMRT (height limiter) which cuts the motor at 30 secs and records the launch height. Electric launch height of 175m with a penalty of 3 pts per metre for Electric launches exceeding it. Most pilots will want to set AMRTs to cut a little below 175m. It is fine instead to use F5J firmware and cut the motor manually. Sittingbourne, Kent, ME9 9AU, United Kingdom
  11. Saturday 1st 1st Northern F5J Wetlands (reserve Sunday 2nd) Final decision re cancellation or reserve by email, Friday 16|:00 Additional Details Address - WETLANDS, Sutton Grange Farm Postcode - DN22 8SB County - Nоttіnghаmѕhіrе Contact - Mike Proctor Contact - Tel No - 07947 294967 Contact - Email - mproctor1@gmail.com
  12. Saturday 7th 6th Northern F5J Wetlands (reserve Sunday 8th ) Final decision re cancellation or reserve by email, Friday 16|:00 Additional Details Address - WETLANDS, Sutton Grange Farm Postcode - DN22 8SB County - Nоttіnghаmѕhіrе Contact - Mike Proctor Contact - Tel No - 07947 294967 Contact - Email - mproctor1@gmail.com
  13. 4th Northern F5J Wetlands Sat 26th (reserve Sunday 27th) Final decision re cancellation or reserve by email, Friday 16|:00 Additional Details Address - WETLANDS, Sutton Grange Farm Postcode - DN22 8SB County - Nоttіnghаmѕhіrе Contact - Mike Proctor Contact - Tel No - 07947 294967 Contact - Email - mproctor1@gmail.com
  14. Saturday 12th 3rd Northern F5J Wetlands (reserve Sunday 13th) Final decision re cancellation or reserve by email, Friday 16|:00 Additional Details Address - WETLANDS, Sutton Grange Farm Postcode - DN22 8SB County - Nоttіnghаmѕhіrе Contact - Mike Proctor Contact - Tel No - 07947 294967 Contact - Email - mproctor1@gmail.com
  15. Nicholls

    1st Northern F5J Wetlands BMFA/BARCS

    Saturday 1st 1st Northern F5J Wetlands (reserve Sunday 2nd) Final decision re cancellation or reserve by email, Friday 16|:00 Additional Details Address - WETLANDS, Sutton Grange Farm Postcode - DN22 8SB County - Nоttіnghаmѕhіrе Contact - Mike Proctor Contact - Tel No - 07947 294967 Contact - Email - mproctor1@gmail.com
  16. Nicholls

    1st Northern F5J Wetlands BMFA/BARCS

    Saturday 1st 1st Northern F5J Wetlands (reserve Sunday 2nd) Final decision re cancellation or reserve by email, Friday 16|:00 Additional Details Address - WETLANDS, Sutton Grange Farm Postcode - DN22 8SB County - Nоttіnghаmѕhіrе Contact - Mike Proctor Contact - Tel No - 07947 294967 Contact - Email - mproctor1@gmail.com
  17. As a result of me not stepping back when volunteers were called for to run this league I've taken up the role. These are the dates of the events that will qualify for BARCS F5J League being held at Bartletts and in Kent although there may be others added April 18th run by KI at Gravesend July 4th Bartletts August 15th Bartletts Sept 5th run by KI at Sutton Valence Full details and entry will be on the BARCS Electric Soaring and F5J Forum Entry £5.00 payable on the day.
  18. ThermalBoy

    PROGLIDE – Home Built Composite F5J Glider - Update October 2018

    In response to the call for some new website content here’s an update on what’s been happening development wise with the PROGLIDE since the last update (March 2017). Short answer, quite a lot! There has now been sufficient time and competitions since the last update to categorically be able to say that the PROGLIDE has shown itself to be a thoroughbred F5J design. I’m not going to list (boring for most people) the many comp successes Kevin and I have achieved with the PROGLIDE other than suffice to say there’s been quite a few of them. Kevin up till now has continued to champion our original wing section whilst I use only the thin winged Synergy section. Both versions have though shown themselves to be excellent performers. We have however found that the Synergy section version offers some advantages over the original wing section in that it hangs in there just as well but shows better penetration in the wind. So what have we been up to over the past year and a half? Firstly we decided that we would like to slim down the fuselage pod to make it more streamlined in its appearance and have a little less air resistance/drag but to still have enough internal space to get everything in without any shoehorning. The attached pictures clearly show just how much its been slimmed down far better than any words can. Kevin, the teams master mould maker, set to work making a new plug followed by new moulds. He did a great job as the pictures show. The other major item we both felt the design would benefit from going forward was to have the ability to produce our own custom sized/lay-ups booms. Whist the commercial versions we have been using certainly did the job they were a tad too lightweight and the size at the tail end was not optimum. After watching a bunch of Youtube videos on the best way for the home builder to make booms we went the opposite way and decided to mould the booms! I had an old Fendon fibreglass boom from way back that just happened to be the ideal size for our new fuselage pod and Kevin used this to make the new boom mould. Unfortunately I forgot to take any pics of the new boom moulds but will do so when I next use them. I had pretty much got on top of producing the carbon fuselage pods to a good standard and right from the first pull the new pods worked out really well. It was a lot stronger and less “Squidgy” under the wing than the original version it was replacing and at 88g AUW, it was light. Next up was the new booms. I had no idea what layup would provide the required rigidity/strength and weight we were looking for. At first I thought the easy way would be to do simple short sections of boom with different layups to determine this. This didn’t work out as I later realised of course that you needed the entire length of the boom in order to test the lateral flex was rigid enough. So no option other than to do various full size test lay-up’s to determine what worked. Home composite building is all about testing , getting it wrong followed by more testing! Laying the booms up in long thin moulds is no easy task to get it spot on and I am still working on the best way to achieve 100% results 100% of the time. Having said that even the first boom out of the mould with a little post production repair work, was totally usable and at 45g not too bad. Its overall strength/rigidity is significantly better than the commercial versions we had been using but it did weigh 9g more. Kevin in fact has used this first boom on his latest model, the PROGLIDE EXTREME. (More on this later). After four complete boom test/lay-ups our preferred lay-up was defined. (Outer - 40g Carboline, Middle-200g UniCarbon, Inner 120g R&G Fibreglass) Final weight of the booms with this lay-up was 41g. Hopefully the weight will continue to come down with more practice. Making the bladders for the booms turned out to be a PITA compared to the fuselage pod bladders, so I’m investigating alternatives for this. We are often asked what pressure we use with our bladders. It surprises a lot of people when they are told it’s between 6-9 psi. The variable air pressure for this task is handled by a £50 EBay airbrush compressor which has a small air reservoir tank. You would be amazed at how much epoxy is expelled from the moulds even at this relatively low psi! I’m sure you’d be able to expel a little more epoxy with a higher psi but its not required for home building as the pics show. Next up was a complete re-work of the spar structure for the centre panel to try and limit wing flex particularly with the thin Synergy sectioned wing. It was decided to completely re-design the spar structure and how it was made. It’s now produced completely outside of the wing and then dropped into a full span channel that is cut from the underside of the wing that finishes 2mm from the top surface of the wing. This has the added benefit that the top surface of the wing requires no additional finishing and gives a perfect top surface ready for lay-up/bagging. Only the underside of the wing where the spar channel is requires minor filling/sanding. The spar uses the protruded commercial 0.5 x 10mm carbon strip top and bottom with solid foam in-between which is then completely wrapped in carbon sock. At the centre of the wing the spars have a substantial moulded carbon dihedral brace that extends out approx 125mm each side. This is made using a simple right angled Aluminium mould. The pics again show it better than words do. I do my spars in two bits and then join the centre panel with the dihedral brace but Kevin makes the entire spar assembly in one piece and drops it into the entire wing centre section in one go. Both methods work fine. Joiner boxes at the ends of the centre section are made by using carbon sock moulded over a 10 x 10mm Ali square tube. Two complete wraps of greaseproof paper are first put around the Ali before the carbon sock is slid on, stretched out and epoxy applied. The greaseproof paper must extend past the ends of the sock by 50mm to ensure no epoxy creeps under it. The greaseproof paper also provides the working clearance fit for the joiners. This technique allows the lightweight carbon joiner box’s to slide off easily from the aluminium after its removed from bagging. The greaseproof paper simply twists out and away from the inner shell of the box’s. Voila, perfect lightweight wing joiner box’s. The same technique is used to produce the carbon tubes now used in the Fin/Rudder. (See pics). New lightweight wing joiners have been produced to keep the weight/inertia down towards the tips as low as possible. The original method of production resulted in each set of joiners weighing approx. 25g. A set of the new joiners weighs approx. 9.5g! At the moment we are carrying on using our original method of spar set-up for the wing tips. Needless to say there is a lot less stress on the wings at the tips compared to the centre section. If however it proves to be the case that the wing tips need or would benefit from the new spar construction method, albeit with a small increase in weight, we will do so. A simplified/lighter method of attaching the fin/rudder to the boom has now been designed. (see pics). One thing that really helped us with the continuing development of the PROGLIDE was the acquisition of a 3D printer. (Every modeller should have one!). We are using this to produce all sorts of PROGLIDE parts including, motor mounts, servo frames, tail pod twin servo carrier, wing end ribs, control horns, centre panel Mpx wing/fuselage plug/socket holders, small part moulds and so on. It’s probably the most useful thing I’ve ever bought for modelling. It took me a bit of time to get on top of it all but it was worth the effort for sure. Finally, this leads me on to our latest development, the PROGLIDE EXTREME. We are currently both building a reduced span (3.55m) version, which will still be light (1150-1250g AUW) but that can handle being ballasted with up to 700-800g of ballast for windy weather use without excessive wing flex. Well that’s the plan at least. The smaller span should also help the tight turning ability in small thermals. Kevin has already produced his EXTREME’S super stiff centre panel using the new centre panel spar lay-up and to quote his words ”I think it would take an F3J tow”. I find that observation reassuring! However, as always, only time and testing will confirm this. The pics attached to this update say a thousand words but if you have any questions please feel free to ask and we will do our best to answer them. Colin Paddon / Kevin Beale
  19. In response to the call for some new website content here’s an update on what’s been happening development wise with the PROGLIDE since the last update (March 2017). Short answer, quite a lot! There has now been sufficient time and competitions since the last update to categorically be able to say that the PROGLIDE has shown itself to be a thoroughbred F5J design. I’m not going to list (boring for most people) the many comp successes Kevin and I have achieved with the PROGLIDE other than suffice to say there’s been quite a few of them. Kevin up till now has continued to champion our original wing section whilst I use only the thin winged Synergy section. Both versions have though shown themselves to be excellent performers. We have however found that the Synergy section version offers some advantages over the original wing section in that it hangs in there just as well but shows better penetration in the wind. So what have we been up to over the past year and a half? Firstly we decided that we would like to slim down the fuselage pod to make it more streamlined in its appearance and have a little less air resistance/drag but to still have enough internal space to get everything in without any shoehorning. The attached pictures clearly show just how much its been slimmed down far better than any words can. Kevin, the teams master mould maker, set to work making a new plug followed by new moulds. He did a great job as the pictures show. The other major item we both felt the design would benefit from going forward was to have the ability to produce our own custom sized/lay-ups booms. Whist the commercial versions we have been using certainly did the job they were a tad too lightweight and the size at the tail end was not optimum. After watching a bunch of Youtube videos on the best way for the home builder to make booms we went the opposite way and decided to mould the booms! I had an old Fendon fibreglass boom from way back that just happened to be the ideal size for our new fuselage pod and Kevin used this to make the new boom mould. Unfortunately I forgot to take any pics of the new boom moulds but will do so when I next use them. I had pretty much got on top of producing the carbon fuselage pods to a good standard and right from the first pull the new pods worked out really well. It was a lot stronger and less “Squidgy” under the wing than the original version it was replacing and at 88g AUW, it was light. Next up was the new booms. I had no idea what layup would provide the required rigidity/strength and weight we were looking for. At first I thought the easy way would be to do simple short sections of boom with different layups to determine this. This didn’t work out as I later realised of course that you needed the entire length of the boom in order to test the lateral flex was rigid enough. So no option other than to do various full size test lay-up’s to determine what worked. Home composite building is all about testing , getting it wrong followed by more testing! Laying the booms up in long thin moulds is no easy task to get it spot on and I am still working on the best way to achieve 100% results 100% of the time. Having said that even the first boom out of the mould with a little post production repair work, was totally usable and at 45g not too bad. Its overall strength/rigidity is significantly better than the commercial versions we had been using but it did weigh 9g more. Kevin in fact has used this first boom on his latest model, the PROGLIDE EXTREME. (More on this later). After four complete boom test/lay-ups our preferred lay-up was defined. (Outer - 40g Carboline, Middle-200g UniCarbon, Inner 120g R&G Fibreglass) Final weight of the booms with this lay-up was 41g. Hopefully the weight will continue to come down with more practice. Making the bladders for the booms turned out to be a PITA compared to the fuselage pod bladders, so I’m investigating alternatives for this. We are often asked what pressure we use with our bladders. It surprises a lot of people when they are told it’s between 6-9 psi. The variable air pressure for this task is handled by a £50 EBay airbrush compressor which has a small air reservoir tank. You would be amazed at how much epoxy is expelled from the moulds even at this relatively low psi! I’m sure you’d be able to expel a little more epoxy with a higher psi but its not required for home building as the pics show. Next up was a complete re-work of the spar structure for the centre panel to try and limit wing flex particularly with the thin Synergy sectioned wing. It was decided to completely re-design the spar structure and how it was made. It’s now produced completely outside of the wing and then dropped into a full span channel that is cut from the underside of the wing that finishes 2mm from the top surface of the wing. This has the added benefit that the top surface of the wing requires no additional finishing and gives a perfect top surface ready for lay-up/bagging. Only the underside of the wing where the spar channel is requires minor filling/sanding. The spar uses the protruded commercial 0.5 x 10mm carbon strip top and bottom with solid foam in-between which is then completely wrapped in carbon sock. At the centre of the wing the spars have a substantial moulded carbon dihedral brace that extends out approx 125mm each side. This is made using a simple right angled Aluminium mould. The pics again show it better than words do. I do my spars in two bits and then join the centre panel with the dihedral brace but Kevin makes the entire spar assembly in one piece and drops it into the entire wing centre section in one go. Both methods work fine. Joiner boxes at the ends of the centre section are made by using carbon sock moulded over a 10 x 10mm Ali square tube. Two complete wraps of greaseproof paper are first put around the Ali before the carbon sock is slid on, stretched out and epoxy applied. The greaseproof paper must extend past the ends of the sock by 50mm to ensure no epoxy creeps under it. The greaseproof paper also provides the working clearance fit for the joiners. This technique allows the lightweight carbon joiner box’s to slide off easily from the aluminium after its removed from bagging. The greaseproof paper simply twists out and away from the inner shell of the box’s. Voila, perfect lightweight wing joiner box’s. The same technique is used to produce the carbon tubes now used in the Fin/Rudder. (See pics). New lightweight wing joiners have been produced to keep the weight/inertia down towards the tips as low as possible. The original method of production resulted in each set of joiners weighing approx. 25g. A set of the new joiners weighs approx. 9.5g! At the moment we are carrying on using our original method of spar set-up for the wing tips. Needless to say there is a lot less stress on the wings at the tips compared to the centre section. If however it proves to be the case that the wing tips need or would benefit from the new spar construction method, albeit with a small increase in weight, we will do so. A simplified/lighter method of attaching the fin/rudder to the boom has now been designed. (see pics). One thing that really helped us with the continuing development of the PROGLIDE was the acquisition of a 3D printer. (Every modeller should have one!). We are using this to produce all sorts of PROGLIDE parts including, motor mounts, servo frames, tail pod twin servo carrier, wing end ribs, control horns, centre panel Mpx wing/fuselage plug/socket holders, small part moulds and so on. It’s probably the most useful thing I’ve ever bought for modelling. It took me a bit of time to get on top of it all but it was worth the effort for sure. Finally, this leads me on to our latest development, the PROGLIDE EXTREME. We are currently both building a reduced span (3.55m) version, which will still be light (1150-1250g AUW) but that can handle being ballasted with up to 700-800g of ballast for windy weather use without excessive wing flex. Well that’s the plan at least. The smaller span should also help the tight turning ability in small thermals. Kevin has already produced his EXTREME’S super stiff centre panel using the new centre panel spar lay-up and to quote his words ”I think it would take an F3J tow”. I find that observation reassuring! However, as always, only time and testing will confirm this. The pics attached to this update say a thousand words but if you have any questions please feel free to ask and we will do our best to answer them. Colin Paddon / Kevin Beale View full f5j article event or report
  20. It is disappointing but understandable that many glider competitions are being cancelled due to the current situation. It is my intention to run F5J competitions at Little Bentley if possible. I believe with a little adjustment to how we do things on the flying field we can maintain a good level of safe separation between ourselves that has minimal to no impact on the actual contest and its result. Here are some of the procedures that we could put in place: Hand washing facilities on field - bring your own towel, bring your own hand wash even. Park well spaced apart - Little Bentley is enormous we can easily park 2 car widths from the next person. Greetings and banter can be had still be done from 3m, no need to be closer. Be totally self sufficient, we all have our own clocks, pens and paper. One person sets the field up, one person sets up the timing equipment, a single person uses the scoring computer - more work for said person but sacrifices have to be made Pilot's briefing can be online the evening before the contest, any extra instructions can be given over PA system. Timing and scoring - no score cards, that's what you bring your own paper or notepad for. Timers stand 2-3m from their pilot, spots would be put further apart to give even more space than normal. Fittest people would go to furthest spots, mid-fit to middle, less able, scorer, timer to nearest spots. Pilot would measure their landing bonus and read launch height while timer keeps their 2-3m distance. Timers give scorer the data while maintaining 2-3m from scoring tent - barrier easily set up with red/white tape and cones or something. Getting to and from your car (pits), the flight line and the scoring tent - look around and choose your moment to walk with as much distance from the person in front as you want. Time between slots could be extended if required. Pilots will launch their own models. No prize giving, results announced over PA system - prize for winner, a bottle of hand-sanitiser. Reverse field and timing system setup - same people that set it up, break it down. No one has to touch anything of anybody else's at all, all day. All the above is relatively easy for us flying F5J, it may be different for other disciplines. I would plan to have a second 'meerkat' PA system reminding everyone to 'mind the gap' every couple of minutes until we're sick of hearing it and have got the message. All this might be academic if we get totally locked down, the current advice is here - Guidance on social distancing - most things at this moment are avoid - I would add to that, avoid reading the newspapers, watching or listening to too much tv or radio news and definitely avoid all anti-social media - except the funny stuff. Cities are the real problem, out here in the countryside we're fine - with reasonable precautions. If you use public transport - stop. If you have contact with children or students - try not to. If you do either of these things, or have contact with people that do these things, then probable best if you do self-isolate. I've given this reasonable thought, hopefully we can still enjoy our competition flying (even if it counts for nought towards BARCS or even BMFA leagues). We could be on for a summer of beautiful thermal flying weather, lets enjoy it instead of being cowed at home TonyM Male ✔ Over 60 ✔ Underlying medical condition ✔ Suppressed immune system ✔ Reducing my activities ✔ Overly worried - still ✘
  21. ThermalBoy

    PROGLIDE - Home Built Composite F5J 3.8m Glider - Update

    It's been over a year since I (Colin Paddon) and Kevin Beale first posted details of our home built and designed 3.8m composite F5J glider, PROGLIDE. This update brings us up to date with the project. It’s all very well designing and building your own competition plane but its not worth a lot if it turns out to be lacking in performance compared to the professionally manufactured gliders that it will be flying against. There seems to be a general misconception that home built F5J competition gliders are in some way inferior to the professional commercial offerings in terms of their flying performance. Straight away lets dispel this myth. The prototype PROGLIDE in its first full year of competition use won three UK F5J league competitions and finished 2nd in the 2016 National UK F5J league with an overall score of 99.06%. Myth dispelled. The only downside of designing and producing your own composite F5J plane is the time and effort it takes to do. If we paid ourselves 50p per hour for all the time we have put into this project we still wouldn’t be able to afford to buy them! It’s a complete labour of love in every way but the sense of achievement makes it all worthwhile. A quick look at the web gallery that accompanies this article will give you some idea of the time and effort that has gone into achieving our original goal which was that it must be economical to build, use techniques that anyone with reasonable building skills can learn/do and most importantly have as good a flight performance as the commercial offerings. Achieving the 100% perfect finish compared to the hollow moulded professionally produced planes was not a high priority. We were only interested in its flight performance and were happy to accept a good finish as opposed to a perfect one. During the development period we worked in parallel on different areas of design/construction. For example I decided that I wanted to be able to split the fuselage in half for ease of air transport which meant that the elevator and rudder servo’s were both enclosed within the tailplane mount pod with the boom being secured to the Fuselage Pod spigot by two carbon tubes that could be removed and the boom slid off. Ditto the fin/rudder assembly. Kevin worked on optimising his layout with the servos under the wing at first followed later by the elevator servo in the tailplane pod and the rudder servo under the wing. For his Fin/Rudder he went along a similar route that the Nan Xplorers use. Finding easy to do home build solutions to problems took time, effort and testing. One of the things that several people asked us about was how we made the wing joiners. In the end it was so simple that I wondered why I hadn’t thought of it before. Buy yourself from HobbyKing a protruded 10x10mm square section carbon rod which comes with a 8mm dia hole all the way through it. Cut into required joiner lengths and angle the two inner end faces to the required angle. Roll up 40mm of unicarbon tows to achieve a tight fit inside the hole, wet out fully with epoxy and slide it half way into one half of the joiner and then the other. Put balsa caps down the hole so that it just very slightly compresses the central wet unicarbon and keeps them centrally located within the length of the joiner and then clamp into required position and allow to set. Result, pair of carbon joiners that weigh 23g total. The plane would be destroyed before the wing joiners broke. This technique wouldn’t be strong enough for F3J planes but more than adequate for our lesser stressed F5J models. Quick, cheap and foolproof with the ability to create any angle of joiners you require. Kevin went a different route by using straight solid round carbon rod which allowed him in our normal wing section to get the required dihedral tip angle he wanted. All this problem solving sounds as if it was a PITA, and at times it felt that way, but in reality we both enjoyed finding home build solutions to these challenges. The first two Proglide’s produced used cheap fibreglass cloth on the flying surfaces which enabled us to learn the required composite skills knowing that when it goes wrong (it will BTW!) that it hadn’t cost the earth in materials. However, the aim was always to eventually use Carboline which is a fantastic cloth but it’s not without good reason that it’s called “Black Gold”, its very expensive but gives a strength to weight ratio that is unbeatable for our purpose. The early fibreglass skinned versions of PROGLIDE achieved RTF weights of between 1450-1580g, ie still reasonably light for a full house 3.8m electric plane. With each new plane we tried different lay-up’s, build techniques and incorporated various detail design changes along the way. Lots of time was expended in producing test pieces during this period to prove the viability of what we were doing. We had failures along the way on pieces that we felt sure would work well but turned out not to be of the standard we were seeking. Amongst the various failures though we managed to have some light bulb moments which were always welcomed! One such moment came when we started to investigate how to achieve repeatable 100% success with shaped inflation bladders in the moulding of the fuselage pod in order to minimise the weight. After quite a few failures it turned out that a fine tipped soldering iron and Recycled black rubbish bags (yes really) worked brilliantly. The variable air pressure for this task was handled by a £50 EBay airbrush compressor which had a small air reservoir tank. After trying various layups, like most of the professional manufacturers, we have now settled on using all carbon for the fuse pods. Another light bulb moment came in regard to hinging the flying surfaces. At first we used silicon hinges which did work but were relatively heavy and difficult to get perfect every time. We later moved to using Diamond tape for the hinge along with Microfibre tape on the inner faces of the foam. (Microfibre tape sticks like the proverbial to raw pink foam). This resulted in strong, lightweight quick to apply, field serviceable (if required) hinges that were very free in their movement. They have turned out to be every bit as good as silicon hinges and in many respects far better. After building a few Proglides we felt confident enough to move onto using Carboline. We also decided at this point that we would again take advantage of having two of us involved. Kevin’s first Carboline PROGLIDE was to use our normal wing section whilst mine was going to use one of the new F5J Syner ultra-thin wing sections. We had hoped to use a friend’s CNC foam cutter for this new prototype wing but unfortunately he moved house just at the wrong time and we all know how much time they take up to get sorted out. So, yet more wing /spar templates to make! Using such a thin wing section on a 3.8m wing brought with it a host of new structural problems to overcome and additionally neither of us was totally convinced that these Ultra-Thin wing sections were the right way to go for F5J. Kevin progressed quickly on his first Carboline build as we now knew exactly how and what to do. He made no attempt to get this plane down to be a super lightweight and used standard sized servo’s with a heavy motor/ESC/battery in the fit out. Even so the finished RTF weight came in at just under 1440g. He estimated that had he used lightweight equipment the finished RTF weight would have been easily under 1300g. The project was moving in the right direction. After flying it Kevin liked his PROGLIDE so much that he immediately decided to press on and make a full on lightweight Carboline version. This ultra lightweight PROGLIDE, which he seemed to put together in record time, came in at 1280g. It fly’s superbly. Meanwhile, it took me a while to iron out the new structural issues raised when building a 3.8m solid core ultra-lightweight thin section wing. Eventually though we were ready to proceed with the build. Did it go smoothly, of course not! Due to a stupid error on my part during the bagging up of the centre panel, I managed to ruin the entire panel. It was an expensive and time consuming mistake to make. After the required amount of San Miguel I decided to build a new centre section straight away. I took this “opportunity” to try a different approach with the spar structure. The rest of the build thankfully went without a hitch. The plane RTF came in at 1245g using lightweight radio gear, 1000mah 3S Hv Lipo and a 85g direct drive motor. All that was needed now was to test fly it to see if it performed as well as we hoped it would. Following several test flying sessions we can report that its flight performance has exceeded all expectations. All preconceived negative thoughts on whether ultra-thin wing sections would work well for F5J have been dispelled. In light of the successful flight testing of the first thin wing PROGLIDE we have decided to build a heavier windy weather version using the same thin wing section. In the meantime the Carboline Ultra light just tested can be ballasted to 1550g AUW which hopefully will be capable of handling a decent amount of wind (yet to be tested). But as we all know, here in the UK there’s times when you just need a heavy plane. For those that are interested in weights here they are. table.tableizer-table { font-size: 12px; border: 1px solid #CCC; font-family: Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif; } .tableizer-table td { padding: 4px; margin: 3px; border: 1px solid #CCC; } .tableizer-table th { background-color: #104E8B; color: #FFF; font-weight: bold; padding: 10px; } Part Finished Weight With Gear Installed Weight Carbon Fuse Pod 89g 135g Boom & Tailplane Mount 35g 55g Centre Panel 263g 333g Left Wing Tip 128g 150g Right Wing Tip 130g 152g Elevator 33g 35g Fin/Rudder/Tube 24g 24g Prop/Spinner/Motor 113g ESC 50g Other installed equipment 78g Total AU RTF Weight 1245g In terms of airframe material costs, the fibreglass skinned versions come in at around £100-£130 and Carboline versions at £200-£250. Labour cost….well let’s not go there! Overall, somewhat cheaper for an equivalent commercially produced 3.8m F5J model at this kind of weight! So what next? We are confident that we can further reduce the overall weight with minor detail changes, improved lay-ups etc, but recognise that we are getting close to what can realistically be achieved in this regard with home building. A picture really does say a thousand words, so if you are interested in seeing how the PROGLIDE is constructed, the photo web gallery that accompanies this write up shows all. If you have any specific questions about the plane or its construction please feel free to ask on this thread. Colin Paddon/Kevin Beale
  22. It's been over a year since I (Colin Paddon) and Kevin Beale first posted details of our home built and designed 3.8m composite F5J glider, PROGLIDE. The original article can be found at this link: https://www.barcs.co.uk/f5j/articles-events-and-reports/articles/proglide-homebuilt-f5j-soarer/ This update brings us up to date with the project. It’s all very well designing and building your own competition plane but its not worth a lot if it turns out to be lacking in performance compared to the professionally manufactured gliders that it will be flying against. There seems to be a general misconception that home built F5J competition gliders are in some way inferior to the professional commercial offerings in terms of their flying performance. Straight away lets dispel this myth. The prototype PROGLIDE in its first full year of competition use won three UK F5J league competitions and finished 2nd in the 2016 National UK F5J league with an overall score of 99.06%. Myth dispelled. The only downside of designing and producing your own composite F5J plane is the time and effort it takes to do. If we paid ourselves 50p per hour for all the time we have put into this project we still wouldn’t be able to afford to buy them! It’s a complete labour of love in every way but the sense of achievement makes it all worthwhile. A quick look at the web gallery that accompanies this article will give you some idea of the time and effort that has gone into achieving our original goal which was that it must be economical to build, use techniques that anyone with reasonable building skills can learn/do and most importantly have as good a flight performance as the commercial offerings. Achieving the 100% perfect finish compared to the hollow moulded professionally produced planes was not a high priority. We were only interested in its flight performance and were happy to accept a good finish as opposed to a perfect one. During the development period we worked in parallel on different areas of design/construction. For example I decided that I wanted to be able to split the fuselage in half for ease of air transport which meant that the elevator and rudder servo’s were both enclosed within the tailplane mount pod with the boom being secured to the Fuselage Pod spigot by two carbon tubes that could be removed and the boom slid off. Ditto the fin/rudder assembly. Kevin worked on optimising his layout with the servos under the wing at first followed later by the elevator servo in the tailplane pod and the rudder servo under the wing. For his Fin/Rudder he went along a similar route that the Nan Xplorers use. Finding easy to do home build solutions to problems took time, effort and testing. One of the things that several people asked us about was how we made the wing joiners. In the end it was so simple that I wondered why I hadn’t thought of it before. Buy yourself from HobbyKing a protruded 10x10mm square section carbon rod which comes with a 8mm dia hole all the way through it. Cut into required joiner lengths and angle the two inner end faces to the required angle. Roll up 40mm of unicarbon tows to achieve a tight fit inside the hole, wet out fully with epoxy and slide it half way into one half of the joiner and then the other. Put balsa caps down the hole so that it just very slightly compresses the central wet unicarbon and keeps them centrally located within the length of the joiner and then clamp into required position and allow to set. Result, pair of carbon joiners that weigh 23g total. The plane would be destroyed before the wing joiners broke. This technique wouldn’t be strong enough for F3J planes but more than adequate for our lesser stressed F5J models. Quick, cheap and foolproof with the ability to create any angle of joiners you require. Kevin went a different route by using straight solid round carbon rod which allowed him in our normal wing section to get the required dihedral tip angle he wanted. All this problem solving sounds as if it was a PITA, and at times it felt that way, but in reality we both enjoyed finding home build solutions to these challenges. The first two Proglide’s produced used cheap fibreglass cloth on the flying surfaces which enabled us to learn the required composite skills knowing that when it goes wrong (it will BTW!) that it hadn’t cost the earth in materials. However, the aim was always to eventually use Carboline which is a fantastic cloth but it’s not without good reason that it’s called “Black Gold”, its very expensive but gives a strength to weight ratio that is unbeatable for our purpose. The early fibreglass skinned versions of PROGLIDE achieved RTF weights of between 1450-1580g, ie still reasonably light for a full house 3.8m electric plane. With each new plane we tried different lay-up’s, build techniques and incorporated various detail design changes along the way. Lots of time was expended in producing test pieces during this period to prove the viability of what we were doing. We had failures along the way on pieces that we felt sure would work well but turned out not to be of the standard we were seeking. Amongst the various failures though we managed to have some light bulb moments which were always welcomed! One such moment came when we started to investigate how to achieve repeatable 100% success with shaped inflation bladders in the moulding of the fuselage pod in order to minimise the weight. After quite a few failures it turned out that a fine tipped soldering iron and Recycled black rubbish bags (yes really) worked brilliantly. The variable air pressure for this task was handled by a £50 EBay airbrush compressor which had a small air reservoir tank. After trying various layups, like most of the professional manufacturers, we have now settled on using all carbon for the fuse pods. Another light bulb moment came in regard to hinging the flying surfaces. At first we used silicon hinges which did work but were relatively heavy and difficult to get perfect every time. We later moved to using Diamond tape for the hinge along with Microfibre tape on the inner faces of the foam. (Microfibre tape sticks like the proverbial to raw pink foam). This resulted in strong, lightweight quick to apply, field serviceable (if required) hinges that were very free in their movement. They have turned out to be every bit as good as silicon hinges and in many respects far better. After building a few Proglides we felt confident enough to move onto using Carboline. We also decided at this point that we would again take advantage of having two of us involved. Kevin’s first Carboline PROGLIDE was to use our normal wing section whilst mine was going to use one of the new F5J Syner ultra-thin wing sections. We had hoped to use a friend’s CNC foam cutter for this new prototype wing but unfortunately he moved house just at the wrong time and we all know how much time they take up to get sorted out. So, yet more wing /spar templates to make! Using such a thin wing section on a 3.8m wing brought with it a host of new structural problems to overcome and additionally neither of us was totally convinced that these Ultra-Thin wing sections were the right way to go for F5J. Kevin progressed quickly on his first Carboline build as we now knew exactly how and what to do. He made no attempt to get this plane down to be a super lightweight and used standard sized servo’s with a heavy motor/ESC/battery in the fit out. Even so the finished RTF weight came in at just under 1440g. He estimated that had he used lightweight equipment the finished RTF weight would have been easily under 1300g. The project was moving in the right direction. After flying it Kevin liked his PROGLIDE so much that he immediately decided to press on and make a full on lightweight Carboline version. This ultra lightweight PROGLIDE, which he seemed to put together in record time, came in at 1280g. It fly’s superbly. Meanwhile, it took me a while to iron out the new structural issues raised when building a 3.8m solid core ultra-lightweight thin section wing. Eventually though we were ready to proceed with the build. Did it go smoothly, of course not! Due to a stupid error on my part during the bagging up of the centre panel, I managed to ruin the entire panel. It was an expensive and time consuming mistake to make. After the required amount of San Miguel I decided to build a new centre section straight away. I took this “opportunity” to try a different approach with the spar structure. The rest of the build thankfully went without a hitch. The plane RTF came in at 1245g using lightweight radio gear, 1000mah 3S Hv Lipo and a 85g direct drive motor. All that was needed now was to test fly it to see if it performed as well as we hoped it would. Following several test flying sessions we can report that its flight performance has exceeded all expectations. All preconceived negative thoughts on whether ultra-thin wing sections would work well for F5J have been dispelled. In light of the successful flight testing of the first thin wing PROGLIDE we have decided to build a heavier windy weather version using the same thin wing section. In the meantime the Carboline Ultra light just tested can be ballasted to 1550g AUW which hopefully will be capable of handling a decent amount of wind (yet to be tested). But as we all know, here in the UK there’s times when you just need a heavy plane. For those that are interested in weights here they are. Part Finished Weight With Gear Installed Weight Carbon Fuse Pod 89g 135g Boom & Tailplane Mount 35g 55g Centre Panel 263g 333g Left Wing Tip 128g 150g Right Wing Tip 130g 152g Elevator 33g 35g Fin/Rudder/Tube 24g 24g Prop/Spinner/Motor 113g ESC 50g Other installed equipment 78g Total AU RTF Weight 1245g In terms of airframe material costs, the fibreglass skinned versions come in at around £100-£130 and Carboline versions at £200-£250. Labour cost….well let’s not go there! Overall, somewhat cheaper for an equivalent commercially produced 3.8m F5J model at this kind of weight! So what next? We are confident that we can further reduce the overall weight with minor detail changes, improved lay-ups etc, but recognise that we are getting close to what can realistically be achieved in this regard with home building. A picture really does say a thousand words, so if you are interested in seeing how the PROGLIDE is constructed, the photo web gallery that accompanies this write up shows all. If you have any specific questions about the plane or its construction please feel free to ask on this thread. Colin Paddon/Kevin Beale View full f5j article event or report
  23. The forecast has not improved so I'm calling the competition off. Here's hoping for more settled weather for the Team Trials. Venue is Little Bentley Polo Club, Rectory Road, Essex, CO7 8SN. Camping on the field Saturday night, pub 1/4 mile up the road, loo on site (hopefully, got to check). Your model must have an approved height limiting/data logging device (AMRT) which must be able to show the max height your model goes to during its motor run time plus 10 seconds after your motor is shut off. The limiting function must be set to allow maximum 30seconds motor run time, and the height limiting function must either be disabled or set to 300m. Motor restart is permitted at any time during flight for safety reasons, but will result in a zero score for that round. Two classes of model can be entered, either Open or 2Metre but only one entry permitted. Prizes awarded on the day and points scored will go towards the National League. The competition will be run to BMFA Local Rules, 6 rounds will be flown if conditions permit and there will not be a flyoff. Entry fee £10.00 (BMFA requirement) payable on the day. Proof of BMFA membership (card is sufficient) required. Timing on the day may vary, and all/any help to set up the field will be appreciated. But the plan is as usual, book in from 9am. First flight around 10am. Ray Gadenne - Open - BMFA 052822 Peter Ley - Open - BMFA 187230 Peter Mitchell - Open - BMFA33859 Graham Wicks - Open - BMFA 052827 Tony Merritt - 2m - BMFA 142327 Peter Sherliker - Open - BMFA 212036 Brian Austin - Open - BMFA 057851 Steve Knowles - Open - BMFA 70799 Simon Conran - 2M - BMFA 195226 Paul Wainwright - Open - BMFA 047845 New roundabout and gap closures. The new roundabout is in use now, so coming from up from the A12 you will now take the second exit, probably signposted Lt. Bentley. The gap across the A120 at Pelhams Corner (the road going through Little Bromley past my house) is now closed, if coming from Ipswich via the A137 you now turn left at the mini-roundabout by the Jet petrol station (sign posted Clacton), right at the crossroads after about a mile, a couple of miles to the roundabout on the A120 by the water tower at Horsley Cross. 3rd exit on to the A120 then left to Lt. Bentley and you're back on the normal route. A very basic map
  24. COMPETITION CANCELLED ---- COMPETITION CANCELLED ---- COMPETITION CANCELLED Cancellatiion of this comp will come as no surprise to you all with the weather forecast for Sunday 22nd September being particularly grim with Rain/Thunderstorms forecast. This after weeks of perfectly flyable weather. This is the third Tonbridge Club F5J comp that has had to be cancelled in succession due to adverse weather conditions. Because of this the organisers would now like to solicit your thoughts/opinion as to whether in future we should consider changing over to the Saturday/Sunday format whereby the day the comp is held on can be either the Saturday or Sunday depending on weather with preference being given to Sunday if both days are flyable. This hopefully would mean there is less chance of having to cancel a comp due to bad weather on a single day. If this format were to be adopted it would simply mean that you would have to indicate when entering which day(s) you were able to fly on. Could you please take a few minutes to post on this thread your thoughts/opinion on possibly moving over to this format. Thank you. Tonbridge club are hosting a BMFA League F5J competition at Leigh Park Farm, Nr Tonbridge, Kent on Sunday 22nd Septmber 2019. All are welcome with plenty of help available on the day for newcomers. For those flyers that paid for entry of our weather disrupted F5J comp on 16 June 2019, entry to this competition is FREE. We would ask though that you please re-enter on this thread so that we know who will be attending. Directions to the field can be found here: https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Leigh+Park+Farm/@51.2091254,0.19327,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x47df4fda3f5fd36d:0xfd76d04136677dd9?hl=en The competition will be run to F5J rules with UK variations as published by the BMFA. The main points for BMFA F5J comps are: - Either Open or 2m may be flown, not both. - Motor restart may be used (results in a zero flight score), and therefore you need only to use your eSoaring switch BUT you must reset the (200m) height limit to 300m this can often be done easily by using a reader, otherwise use a computer. - As in eSoaring, you must provide a reader, so that your timekeeper can check your launch height immediately after landing. - Minimum of 4 rounds to be flown but usually 6 rounds are flown. No fly-off's. Entry fee £10.00 (BMFA requirement) payable on the day. * See Above Proof of insurance (BMFA membership card is sufficient) required Closing date for entries is 6.00pm Friday 20th September 2019 In the event that there is any doubt as to whether the event will be run due to forecasted inclement weather, a final decision will be posted on this thread by no later than 4pm on Saturday 21st September. We look forward to seeing you on the field. Book in from 9am. First flight’s 10.00am Colin/Graham Please enter this competition by posting here on this thread: 1) Your name 2) Class being entered - i.e. OPEN or 2 METRE 3) Preferred Frequency if on 35Mhz. 4) BMFA Number Entry list to date: 1. Graham Wicks, Open, 2.4, BMFA 052827 2. Colin Boorman, Open 2.4, BMFA 027713 3. Kevin Beale, Open, 2.4, BMFA 040788 4. Colin Paddon, Open, 2.4, BMFA 073473 5. Ian Nicholls, OPEN 2.4GHz BMFA 39293 6. Rob Love, Open, 2.4GHz, BMFA TBA 7. Ray Gadene, Open, 2.4, BMFA 0528224 8. Eddy Small, Open, 2.4GHz, BMFA 063558 9. Keith Fisher, Open, 2.4, BMFA 060851 10. Brian Austin, Open, 2.4, BMFA 57851 11. Derek Potter, Open, 2.4 Ghz, BMFA tba 12. Colin Lucas, Open, 2.4, BMFA tba 13. Ian Duff, Open, 2.4ghz, BMFA 018894 14. Terry Stuckey, Open, 2.4, BMFA tba 15. Gary Matthews, Open, 2.4, BMFA 032611 16. Peter Mitchell, Open, 2.4 BMFA33859 17. Richard Harris, Open 2,4 BMFA 085832 18. Steve Knowles, Open, 2.4, BMFA 7079 19. Mike Connell, Open. 2.4, BMFA 155649 20. John Hovell, Open, 2.4, BMFA 40572 21. Peter Sherliker, Open 2.4, BMFA 212036 22. Alan Twine, Opn, 2.4, BMFA 067979 23. Eamon Keating, Open, 2.4GhZ, BMFA 192268 24. Bob Hope, Open,2.4, tba 25. Phil Ramsey, Open, 2.4Ghz, BMFA tba 26. Al Lipscombe, Open, 2.4 GHz, S067235 27. Bob Ryan, Open, BMFA no. 76538 28. Tony Merritt, 2M, 2.4, BMFA 142327 29. Mike Raybone, Open, 2.4, BMFA 51420 30. Peter Allen, Open, 2.4, BMFA tba 31. Chas Dunster, OPen, 2.4, BMFA tba
  25. ALTIS v4+ WARNING - cable issue!!! AerobTec WARNING - cable issue!!! Dear customers, based on several reports received from some of you in August this year we discovered that some of the devices have an issue with the input or output cables caused by our cable supplier. It seems some of the cables have incorrect crimping of the wire which was not discovered during the quality check, since the devices behaved normally and there was no suspicion about it. The crimping issue might lead to interrupted of some of the connections on the way between the receiver and ESC which might have its consequences. Therefore it is recommended to pay appropriate attention to it. We identified that the affected devices are Altis v4+ delivered mostly in the first half of 2019 and the serial numbers are from the range 464912388 to 498073604. It is not excluded that some other devices are affected as well – you can check also other devices. We had also one report on Device Terminal cable affected by this but at the moment there is no further indication if it is a single case or if it is related to the same issue. It is recommended to check the cables according to following: • Test the device in plane on ground • Plug Altis between the receiver and ESC • Run the motor • Move the cable near connector in order to detect possible disconnection of the cable. • Other check consists of trying to pull the cable from its housing (disconnected from plane). Hold the housing and pull the cable with a moderate force. You can also try it separately with all three wires entering the housing. If the wires are loosen easily, you probably have one of the affected devices. If you detected that your device is affected by the problem or you have doubts about it feel free to contact us and send the device for replacement or repair for free. If you decide to repair it yourself, please contact us and let us know about your case. We are now in contact with the cable manufacturer so the issue does not occur again and we will extend the quality check during manufacturing steps. We would like to apology for the inconveniences caused by the mentioned issue and we believe you will stay loyal to our products. https://www.facebook.com/AerobTec/ info@aerobtec.com
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